2

I would like to rename a PostgreSQL (9.6) table in a way that is recoverable for my system (A java app using JPA/Hibernate)

In my java code, a JPA entity would have the following annotations @Entity @Table(name="old_name") and the database would have an equivalent table called old_name.

I would like to rename the table to new_name in a way that I can incrementally update the database and java app, allowing for failure and rollback.

Typical steps would be

  1. create copy of old_name in new_name
  2. ensure read/writes available in both (i.e. data is replicated both ways)
  3. update java app to use new table new_name
  4. when confident system update complete, remove old_name

Effectively I would like a duplicate table in the same schema with the same data, both able to accept reads and writes, that can be read from JPA entities.

I am aware of the use of triggers, and would like to avoid that. I am hoping there is a technique I'm not aware of and haven't found that would make this less painful than using triggers.

I have tried to rename the table and create a "simple view" over it, however the JPA entity complains as it can't find a table with the name of the view. (Because it is a view, not a table :) and there seems no @View/@Table JPA annotation that will handle this)

I haven't yet tried the facilities listed here: http://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/Replication,_Clustering,_and_Connection_Pooling as the majority seem to be about pooling, sharding, and I need a simple short term table replica, but I will be investigating these also.

Thanks - I would like the simplest option of course, preferring something built in to postgres/JPA but will seriously consider 3rd party options also.

  • The joys of obfuscation layers, a view would have been the easiest and most efficient solution. Does your obfuscation layer "accept" a foreign table? – a_horse_with_no_name Dec 12 '18 at 6:47
  • I honestly don't know, though I would expect it to be more likely as it is considered as a table in postgres rather than a view. Postgres at least pretends its a table here :) @a_horse_with_no_name – Mitch Kent Dec 12 '18 at 9:13
  • Another option would be logical replication – a_horse_with_no_name Dec 12 '18 at 9:15
  • logical replication would be tricky, because the connections between the replicated tables has to be made in "replication mode" and so the automated release process would have to manage this (or, worse, I'd have to). Doing it in code such as the entity listeners below means it will just work (tm) on all services and developer machines. – Mitch Kent Dec 12 '18 at 9:23
6

Database tables

Assuming you have the following two tables:

CREATE TABLE old_post (
    id int8 NOT NULL,
    title varchar(255),
    version int4 NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (id)
)

CREATE TABLE post (
    id int8 NOT NULL,
    created_on date, 
    title varchar(255),
    version int4 NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (id)
)

JPA entity

The old_post table must be replicated with the newer post. Notice that the post table has more columns now than the old table.

We only need to map the Post entity:

@Entity(name = "Post")
@Table(name = "post")
public static class Post {

    @Id
    private Long id;

    private String title;

    @Column(name = "created_on")
    private LocalDate createdOn = LocalDate.now();

    @Version
    private int version;

    //Getters and setters omitted for brevity
}

Hibernate event listeners

Now, we have to register 3 event listeners to intercept the INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE operations for the Post entity.

We can do this via the following event listeners:

public class ReplicationInsertEventListener 
        implements PostInsertEventListener {

    public static final ReplicationInsertEventListener INSTANCE = 
        new ReplicationInsertEventListener();

    @Override
    public void onPostInsert(
            PostInsertEvent event) 
            throws HibernateException {
        final Object entity = event.getEntity();

        if(entity instanceof Post) {
            Post post = (Post) entity;

            event.getSession().createNativeQuery(
                "INSERT INTO old_post (id, title, version) " +
                "VALUES (:id, :title, :version)")
            .setParameter("id", post.getId())
            .setParameter("title", post.getTitle())
            .setParameter("version", post.getVersion())
            .setFlushMode(FlushMode.MANUAL)
            .executeUpdate();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean requiresPostCommitHanding(
            EntityPersister persister) {
        return false;
    }
}

public class ReplicationUpdateEventListener 
    implements PostUpdateEventListener {

    public static final ReplicationUpdateEventListener INSTANCE = 
        new ReplicationUpdateEventListener();

    @Override
    public void onPostUpdate(
            PostUpdateEvent event) {
        final Object entity = event.getEntity();

        if(entity instanceof Post) {
            Post post = (Post) entity;

            event.getSession().createNativeQuery(
                "UPDATE old_post " +
                "SET title = :title, version = :version " +
                "WHERE id = :id")
            .setParameter("id", post.getId())
            .setParameter("title", post.getTitle())
            .setParameter("version", post.getVersion())
            .setFlushMode(FlushMode.MANUAL)
            .executeUpdate();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean requiresPostCommitHanding(
            EntityPersister persister) {
        return false;
    }
}

public class ReplicationDeleteEventListener 
        implements PreDeleteEventListener {

    public static final ReplicationDeleteEventListener INSTANCE = 
        new ReplicationDeleteEventListener();

    @Override
    public boolean onPreDelete(
            PreDeleteEvent event) {
        final Object entity = event.getEntity();

        if(entity instanceof Post) {
            Post post = (Post) entity;

            event.getSession().createNativeQuery(
                "DELETE FROM old_post " +
                "WHERE id = :id")
            .setParameter("id", post.getId())
            .setFlushMode(FlushMode.MANUAL)
            .executeUpdate();
        }

        return false;
    }
}

The 3 event listeners can be registered using a Hibernate Integrator:

public class ReplicationEventListenerIntegrator 
        implements Integrator {

    public static final ReplicationEventListenerIntegrator INSTANCE = 
        new ReplicationEventListenerIntegrator();

    @Override
    public void integrate(
            Metadata metadata,
            SessionFactoryImplementor sessionFactory,
            SessionFactoryServiceRegistry serviceRegistry) {

        final EventListenerRegistry eventListenerRegistry =
                serviceRegistry.getService(EventListenerRegistry.class);

        eventListenerRegistry.appendListeners(
            EventType.POST_INSERT, 
            ReplicationInsertEventListener.INSTANCE
        );

        eventListenerRegistry.appendListeners(
            EventType.POST_UPDATE, 
            ReplicationUpdateEventListener.INSTANCE
        );

        eventListenerRegistry.appendListeners(
            EventType.PRE_DELETE, 
            ReplicationDeleteEventListener.INSTANCE
        );
    }

    @Override
    public void disintegrate(
            SessionFactoryImplementor sessionFactory,
            SessionFactoryServiceRegistry serviceRegistry) {

    }
}

And, to instruct Hibernate to use this custom Integrator, you need to set up the hibernate.integrator_provider configuration property:

<property name="hibernate.integrator_provider"
          value="com.vladmihalcea.book.hpjp.hibernate.listener.ReplicationEventListenerIntegrator "/>

Testing time

Now, when persisting a Post entity:

Post post1 = new Post();
post1.setId(1L);
post1.setTitle(
    "The High-Performance Java Persistence book is to be released!"
);

entityManager.persist(post1);

Hibernate will execute the following SQL INSERT statements:

Query:["INSERT INTO old_post (id, title, version) VALUES (?, ?, ?)"], Params:[(1, The High-Performance Java Persistence book is to be released!, 0)]

Query:["insert into post (created_on, title, version, id) values (?, ?, ?, ?)"], Params:[(2018-12-12, The High-Performance Java Persistence book is to be released!, 0, 1)]

When doing another transaction that updates an existing Post entity and creates a new Post entity:

Post post1 = entityManager.find(Post.class, 1L);
post1.setTitle(post1.getTitle().replace("to be ", ""));

Post post2 = new Post();
post2.setId(2L);
post2.setTitle(
    "The High-Performance Java Persistence book is awesome!"
);

entityManager.persist(post2);

Hibernate replicates all actions to the old_post table as well:

 Query:["select tablerepli0_.id as id1_1_0_, tablerepli0_.created_on as created_2_1_0_, tablerepli0_.title as title3_1_0_, tablerepli0_.version as version4_1_0_ from post tablerepli0_ where tablerepli0_.id=?"], Params:[(1)]

 Query:["INSERT INTO old_post (id, title, version) VALUES (?, ?, ?)"], Params:[(2, The High-Performance Java Persistence book is awesome!, 0)]

 Query:["insert into post (created_on, title, version, id) values (?, ?, ?, ?)"], Params:[(2018-12-12, The High-Performance Java Persistence book is awesome!, 0, 2)]

 Query:["update post set created_on=?, title=?, version=? where id=? and version=?"], Params:[(2018-12-12, The High-Performance Java Persistence book is released!, 1, 1, 0)]

 Query:["UPDATE old_post SET title = ?, version = ? WHERE id = ?"], Params:[(The High-Performance Java Persistence book is released!, 1, 1)]

When deleting a Post entity:

Post post1 = entityManager.getReference(Post.class, 1L);
entityManager.remove(post1);

The old_post record is deletected as well:

Query:["DELETE FROM old_post WHERE id = ?"], Params:[(1)]
Query:["delete from post where id=? and version=?"], Params:[(1, 1)]

For more details, check out this article.

Code available on GitHub.

  • This is a great answer - thank you. I presume this secondary dml would be committed in the same transaction? – Mitch Kent Dec 12 '18 at 16:26
  • Yes, that's right. – Vlad Mihalcea Dec 12 '18 at 17:00

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