0
x = 2**1000000
n = 2**100000000

(x**2-2)%n is too slow. I found pow() but I can't use it because I can't subtract 2. (pow(x, 2)-2)%n and (x*x-2)%n are also slow. When I tested (x*x-2) it was fast but when I added the modulo operator it was slow. Is there a way to compute (x**2-2)%n faster?

  • 2
    could you maybe simplify it based on modulo properties? A quick look (and intuition) reveals that you do not need the -2 for example. – Ev. Kounis Dec 11 '18 at 13:16
  • I don't know the modulo properties. Can you send a link? – Johnny P. Dec 11 '18 at 13:17
  • For a large value of x. – Johnny P. Dec 11 '18 at 13:19
  • 1
    What is your criterion of "too slow" ? Do you have some numbers for an existing test run, and a figure that you would like to achieve ? – MikeW Dec 11 '18 at 13:23
  • 5
    1) (a+b)mod(n) = amod(n)+bmod(N) 2) (a.b)mod(n) = amod(n).bmod(n) – Vijay Kalmath Dec 11 '18 at 13:24
8

Are you running this in the interpreter? I did some testing and the main slowdown seemed to come from the interpreter trying to display the result.

If you assign the expression to a variable, the interpreter won't try to display the result, and it will be very quick:

x = 2**1000000
n = 2**100000000
result = (x**2-2)%n

Addendum:

I was also originally thinking along the same lines as MikeW's answer, and if you wanted every part of the code to be fast, you could take advantage of Python's internal base 2 representation of integers and use bitwise left shifts:

x = 1 << 1000000
n = 1 << 100000000

This comes with the caveat that this only works because x and n are powers of 2, and you have to be more careful to avoid making an off-by-one error. This answer is a good explanation of how bitshifts basically work, but Python is bit different than other languages like C, C++, or Java because Python integers are unlimited precision, so you can never left shift a bit completely away like you could in other languages.

  • Is x = 1 << 1000000 equal to x = 2**1000000? – Johnny P. Dec 11 '18 at 13:38
  • @JohnnyP. Yes, you can test it yourself: 2**100000000 == 1 << 100000000 – Graham Dec 11 '18 at 13:39
  • Can % work in binary numbers? – Johnny P. Dec 11 '18 at 13:41
  • @JohnnyP. Internally, all numbers are binary to Python. As demonstrated by the above comparison, the numbers are identical. The only difference is that using a bitshift is faster than individually doing each multiplication by 2 (I'll add a link explaining binary in a second) – Graham Dec 11 '18 at 13:44
  • It runs very fast. – Johnny P. Dec 11 '18 at 13:51
2

Some module rules :

1) (a+b)mod(n) = amod(n)+bmod(N)

2) (a.b)mod(n) = amod(n).bmod(n)

So you can transform your equation into :

(x**2-2)%n ==> (x.x - 2)%n ==> (x%n).(x%n) - (2%n)

If n is always greater than 2, (2%n) is 2 itself.

solving (x%n) :

If x and n are always in 2**value ; if x > n then (x%n)= 0 is the answer and if x < n (x%n)=x

So the answer is either 0-(2%n) or x**2-(2%n)

  • These rules are incorrect, at least as written here. For example (3+4) mod 5 = 2, while (3 mod 5) + (4 mod 5) = 7. You need to replace "=" with "≡". Or, equivalently, add one more "mod(n)" at the end. – vog Dec 11 '18 at 14:10
0

If x is always a power of 2, and n is always a power of 2, then you can you can compute it easily and quickly using bit operations on a byte array, which you can then reconstitute into a "number".

If 2^N is (binary) 1 followed by N zeroes, then (2^N)^2 is (binary) 1 followed by 2N zeros.

2^3 squared is b'1000000'

If you have a number 2^K (binary 1 followed by K zeroes), then 2^K - 2 will be K-1 1s (ones) followed by a zero.

eg 2^4 is 16 =  b'10000', 2^4 - 2 is b'1110'

If you require "% 2^M" then in binary, you just select the last (lower) M bits, and disregard the rest .

9999 is       b'10011100001111'
9999 % 2^8 is       b'00001111'

'

Hence combining the parts, if x=2^A and n=2^B, then

(x^2 - 2 ) % n

will be: (last B bits of) (binary) (2*A - 1 '1's followed by a '0')

  • How can I do it? – Johnny P. Dec 11 '18 at 13:31
  • You don't need a "byte array" to do this—that's essentially what Python's built-in int type is already. Just use shift operators on int values. See the Edit in @Graham's answer. – martineau Dec 11 '18 at 13:39
0

If you want to compute (x ** y - z) % n
it will be equivalent to ((x ** y) % n - z) % n

Python pow function includes as optional parameter a modulo, as it is very often used and can be computed in an optimized way. So you should use:

(pow(x, y, n) - z) % n
  • it is not faster. – B. M. Dec 11 '18 at 14:08
0

OP says in comment : it's slow because I assign x to the answer and I repeat the process.

I try this :

x = 2**(1000*1000)
n = 2**(100*1000*1000)

import time
t0=time.time()
for i in range(6):
    x = (x*x-2)%n   
    t1=time.time()
    print(i,t1-t0)
    t0=t1

print(x<n)

"""    
0 0.0
1 0.4962291717529297
2 0.5937404632568359
3 1.9043104648590088
4 5.708504915237427
5 16.74528479576111  
True   
"""

It shows that in this problem, it's just slow because x grows, doubling the number of digit at each loop :

In [5]: %timeit  u=x%n
149 ns ± 6.42 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000000 loops each)

the %n takes absolutely no time if x<n.

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