2

So this might be one of those "that's obviously easy" or "obviously impossible" questions..

But imagine a simple buffer protocol where the data is prefixed by a byte indicating the type. So you'd have 04 00 for a false bool and 02 00 00 00 01 for a uint32_t with a value of 1.

Would it be possible to serialize data at compiletime so that Serialize(false, true, uint32_t(3)); returns a sequence like 04 00 04 01 02 00 00 00 03?

If so, could one create prepared statements like that would just have zeroes in the sequence that could be filled at runtime? As well as maybe even doing basic unit-testing like static_assert(Deserialize<bool, bool>("\x04\x01\x04\x00")[0] == true, "Error");

// e.g something like this.
template<typename T> constexpr uint8_t Prefix()
{
    if constexpr (std::is_same_v<T, bool>) return 0x04;
    if constexpr (std::is_same_v<T, uint32_t>) return 0x02;
    return 0x00;
};
template <typename T> ctString Write(T Value)
{
    ctString Temp{};
    Temp += Write(Prefix<T>());
    Temp += /* something sizeof(Value) */;
    return Temp;
};
template <typename... Args> ctString Serialize(std::tuple<Args...> Input)
{
    ctString Temp{};
    std::apply([&](auto Argument) { Temp += Write(Arguement); }, Input);
    return Temp;
};

constexpr auto Message = Serialize(false, true, uint32_t(3));
  • C++11, C++14 or C++17? If you can use C++17, I see a solution a lot simpler. – max66 Dec 11 '18 at 16:40
  • 2
    @max66: As OP uses if constexpr, c++17 seems fine. – Jarod42 Dec 11 '18 at 16:41
  • 1
    Have you succeed to write it without meta-prog ? which part do you fail to turn compile time ? – Jarod42 Dec 11 '18 at 16:45
  • 1
    So instead of std::string, try to use std::array<char, N> (kind of compile-time string): you can compute N at compile time depending of the type. – Jarod42 Dec 11 '18 at 16:50
  • 2
    Something like constexpr std::size_t total_size = (computeSize<Args>() + ...);, in your case, computeSize<Args>() seems to be (1 + sizeof(Args)). – Jarod42 Dec 11 '18 at 16:58
3

Something like this:

template <typename... Args>
constexpr auto serialize(Args... args) {
    // better not pass in std::string or something...
    static_assert((std::is_trivially_copyable_v<Args> && ...));

    // each size better fit in a byte
    static_assert((sizeof(Args) < 256 && ...));

    std::array<char, 
       (sizeof...(Args) +    // one byte for each arg
       (sizeof(Args) + ...)  // sum of the sizes of the args
       )> buffer;
    char* p = buffer.data();
    auto fill = [](char* p, auto arg) { /* ... */ };
    (p = fill(p, args), ...);
    return buffer;
}

The tricky part is writing fill such that you can actually implement it in constexpr - since you can't use either memcpy or placement new to write the arg into the buffer. You have to manually do things - which means you have to manually manage endianness and all that junk. The simple direction is:

auto fill = [](char* p, auto arg) {
    *p++ = sizeof(arg);
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(arg); ++i) {
        *p++ = arg & 0xff;
        arg >>= 8;
    }
    return p;
};
0

Just for fun, I propose a template-meta-programming version that works compile-time only and store the serialization in a std::integer_sequence<char, ...> type (intead of char you can use unsigned char or std::uint8_t or other type, obviously).

So the serialization is done passing the values that you want serialize as template arguments obtaining a type (this works only starting from C++17 because use auto template value types)

using t1 = Serialize_t<false, true, std::uint32_t{3u}>;

and deserialization return a constexpr std::tuple<Ts...> (where Ts... are the appropriate types)

// d, in this case, is a std::tuple<bool, bool, std::uint32_t>
constexpr auto d { Deserialize_v<t1> }; 

static_assert( std::get<0>(d) == false             );
static_assert( std::get<1>(d) == true              );
static_assert( std::get<2>(d) == std::uint32_t{3u} );

The following is a full compiling (C++17) example

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

template <int I, auto V, char ... Cs>
struct IntChs : public IntChs<I-1, (V >> 8), char(V & 0xff), Cs...>
 { };

template <auto V, char ... Cs>
struct IntChs<0, V, Cs...>
 { using type = std::integer_sequence<char, Cs...>; };

template <int I, auto V>
using IntChs_t = typename IntChs<I, V>::type;

template <typename, char ...>
struct ConcatChs;

template <char ... Cs0, char ... Cs1>
struct ConcatChs<std::integer_sequence<char, Cs0...>, Cs1...>
 { using type = std::integer_sequence<char, Cs1..., Cs0...>; };

template <typename T, T V, char ... Cs>
struct SerVal;

// std::uint32_t case
template <std::uint32_t V, char ... Cs>
struct SerVal<std::uint32_t, V, Cs...>
  : public ConcatChs<IntChs_t<4, V>, Cs..., '\x02'>
 { };

// bool case
template <bool V, char ... Cs>
struct SerVal<bool, V, Cs...>
  : public ConcatChs<IntChs_t<1, int(V)>, Cs..., '\x04'>
 { };    

// ******************************** //
// other serialization cases to add //
// ******************************** //

template <auto V, char ... Cs>
struct ConcatSer : public SerVal<decltype(V), V, Cs...>
 { };

template <auto V, char ... Cs>
using ConcatSer_t = typename ConcatSer<V, Cs...>::type;

template <typename, auto ...>
struct Serialize;

template <char ... Cs, auto V0, auto ... Vs>
struct Serialize<std::integer_sequence<char, Cs...>, V0, Vs...>
 : public Serialize<ConcatSer_t<V0, Cs...>, Vs...>
 { };

template <typename T>
struct Serialize<T>
 { using type = T; };

template <auto ... Vs>
using Serialize_t = typename Serialize<std::integer_sequence<char>, Vs...>::type;

template <typename T, char ... Cs>
constexpr T Val ()
 {
   T ret{};

   ((ret <<= 8, ret += T(Cs)), ...);

   return ret;
 }

template <typename, auto...>
struct Deserialize;

// bool case
template <char C0, char ... Cs, auto ... Vs>
struct Deserialize<std::integer_sequence<char, '\x04', C0, Cs...>, Vs...>
   : public Deserialize<std::integer_sequence<char, Cs...>,
                        Vs..., Val<bool, C0>()>
 { };

// std::uint32_t case
template <char C0, char C1, char C2, char C3, char ... Cs, auto ... Vs>
struct Deserialize<std::integer_sequence<char, '\x02', C0, C1, C2, C3, Cs...>,
                   Vs...>
   : public Deserialize<std::integer_sequence<char, Cs...>,
                        Vs..., Val<std::uint32_t, C0, C1, C2, C3>()>
 { };

// ********************************** //
// other deserialization cases to add //
// ********************************** //

// final case: the tuple
template <auto ... Vs>
struct Deserialize<std::integer_sequence<char>, Vs...>
 { static constexpr auto value = std::make_tuple(Vs...); };

template <typename T>
constexpr auto Deserialize_v = Deserialize<T>::value;

int main()
 {
   using t1 = Serialize_t<false, true, std::uint32_t{3u}>;
   using t2 = std::integer_sequence<char, 
      '\x04', '\x00', '\x04', '\x01', '\x02', '\x00', '\x00', '\x00', '\x03'>;

   static_assert( std::is_same_v<t1, t2> );

   constexpr auto d { Deserialize_v<t1> }; 

   static_assert( std::get<0>(d) == false             );
   static_assert( std::get<1>(d) == true              );
   static_assert( std::get<2>(d) == std::uint32_t{3u} );
 }

This code works for big-endian and little-endian architectures but with a great limit: require that the number of bits in a char is 8.

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