11

Often I'm in a situation where I need a simple RAII wrapper, but I wouldn't want to create a whole new class for this for many reasons including time constraints and organization problems. My quick-n-dirty solution is the following.

Say I want to make sure that by the end of the scope, I want a boolean to switch back to its original state:

bool prevState = currState;
currState      = newState;
std::unique_ptr<int, std::function<void(int*)>> txEnder(new int(0), [&prevState](int* p) {
    currState = prevState;
    delete p;
});

This solution works fine, but the dirty part is the necessity to allocate and deallocate that integer just to make unique_ptr work and call the custom destructor at destruction.

Is there a cleaner way to do this without having to write a whole class, and get rid of the new for the dummy int?

14
  • 1
    Not sure you need to allocate anything? Dec 12, 2018 at 9:37
  • 2
    What about writing a simple class once and give it a lambda as you want at construction and call that at the destructor? Similar like a lock guard. Dec 12, 2018 at 9:41
  • 1
    @TheQuantumPhysicist I am not talking about new classes (<- plural), just a single one you can use for all of these cases. It would be very simple, and you even can make it a template if you need to have stuff forwarded to the lambda. Dec 12, 2018 at 9:44
  • 1
    @πάνταῥεῖ I know, buddy. I have one that I discussed before on Stackoverflow (I call SmartHandle). But, again, I don't have the freedom to do that in all the projects I work at depending on many circumstances, ranging from hastiness down to project organization problems. Dec 12, 2018 at 9:45
  • 1
    @TheQuantumPhysicist What a pity if you can't do the necessary work because of such silly circumstances. But I know that kind of situation. Dec 12, 2018 at 9:48

4 Answers 4

7

You can use BOOST_SCOPE_EXIT

auto prevState{currState};
currState = newState;
BOOST_SCOPE_EXIT(&currState, &prevState)
{
     currState = prevState;
} BOOST_SCOPE_EXIT_END
1
6

A little bit better than yours: You can use &prevState in the custom destructor without deleting it, so you do not need to new and delete something:

void foo(bool & currState, bool newState)
{
    bool prevState = currState;
    currState      = newState;
    std::unique_ptr<bool, std::function<void(bool*)>> txEnder(&prevState, [&prevState, &currState](bool* p) {
        currState = prevState;
    });
    cout << "currState: " << currState << endl;
}

You also forgot to capture currState in the lambda.

Here is an example: https://ideone.com/DH7vZu

9
  • This is perfect. I don't know how this didn't occur to me. I'm just being a little paranoid thinking whether this breaks any rules! Dec 12, 2018 at 9:53
  • Interesting solution for the problem. Dec 12, 2018 at 9:59
  • 1
    I would just note that this solution might not be the most efficient one, since std::function applies type erasure, which implies dynamic memory allocations (possibly small-buffer optimized) and virtual function overhead (see, e.g., stackoverflow.com/a/9088690/580083). "Classic" ScopeGuard, such as that from Boost, might be more efficient. Dec 12, 2018 at 10:11
  • 1
    @TheQuantumPhysicist Also note that there is a proposal for adding scope guards (std::scope_...) into the Stadndard library: open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2018/p0052r9.pdf. Dec 12, 2018 at 11:57
  • 1
    @DanielLangr I would appreciate it more if they add destructors to lamdas... that would be a killer feature! Dec 12, 2018 at 12:12
0

Don't use std::function. It creates a lot of code including vtables. https://gcc.godbolt.org/z/XgDoHz
If you absolutely don't want to use any external class or function, do below:

bool foo_2() {
    bool f = false;
    auto eos = [&](void*){
        f = true;
    };
    std::unique_ptr<void, decltype(eos)> h{&eos,std::move(eos)};
    return f;
}

If you are ok with a little reusable function, below works. This abstracts the unused void*.

C++14 or later

template<class F>
auto call_at_end_of_scope(F&& f){
    auto eos = [f{std::forward<F>(f)}](void*){f();};
    return std::unique_ptr<void, decltype(eos)>{&eos,std::move(eos)};
}

bool foo_3() {
    bool f = false;
    auto handle = call_at_end_of_scope([&](){
        f = true;
    });
    return f;
}
0

How about gsl::finally? Library is not so heavy as boost and finally does not use std::function, so can be easly inlined. Also no dynamic allocation of std::unique_ptr

using namespace std;

void foo(bool & currState, bool newState)
{
    auto revertState = gsl::finally([prevState = currState, &currState]{
        currState = prevState;
    });
    currState = newState;       
    cout << "currState: " << currState << endl;
}


int main() {
    bool state = false;
    foo(state, true);
    cout << "state: " << state << endl;
    return 0;
}

Online example: https://ideone.com/Xi1izz (with copied gsl::finally, since #include <gsl/gsl> is not available here)

1
  • Your solution may be correct, but the challenge was to have the shortest path. The answer that is accepted is super-short and doesn't have any dynamic allocation. Dec 15, 2018 at 11:46

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