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For example, The source file is of 1 gb with 25000 lines, I want to split the files with size threshold 100 mb. I need the small files with whole lines and not with partial line in 1 file and remaining partial line in other file, because of size constraints. Thanks in advance. Please let me know if my question confuses.

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If your split command supports option -C size or --line-bytes=size (see man split) you can use

split -C 100M inputfile
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@bodo's split -C is a better solution, but if you don't have that, you can count the characters as you go with awk and roll over to a new output file whenever you get to 100*1024*1024 characters of output.

Note that there is an implicit assumption of 1 byte per character here - watch out if using multi-byte characters etc.

awk '{
   # Total up length of this line plus a line-feed
   t=t+length($0)+1
   # If we have reached 100MB, roll over the chunk number and zero tally
   if(t>100*1024*1024){c+=1;t=0}
   # Write current line to file "chunk-NNN.txt"
   print >> "chunk-" (c+1) ".txt"
}' YourFile.txt
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I don't believe it's that simple:

On my PC, I have a file, called "prebuild.txt". In order to know the size, I do ls -l (this can be parsed):

Prompt>ls -s prebuild.txt
135868 prebuild.txt

So, the size is about 135,868 Mb.

The amount of lines can be found, using wc -l:

Prompt>wc -l prebuild.txt
424358 prebuild.txt

In order to cut it into a piece of ±100Mb, I need to know the percentage:

Prompt>$ echo 100*100000/135868 | bc
73.6

So, I need about 73.6% of the file. The corresponding amount of lines:

echo 73.6*424358/100 | bc
312327,488

Just putting the first 312327 lines of the file into file1.txt should do it:

head -312327 prebuild.txt >file1.txt

The rest can be done playing with head and tail on the reminding lines of the original file until nothing's left anymore.

P.s. I didn't test the bc related commands (I don't get bc, basic calculator, installed on my system).

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