41

In C++14 given the following code:

void foo() {
  double d = 5.0;
  auto p1 = new int[d];
}

clang compiles this without diagnostic while gcc on the other hand produces the following diagnostic (see it live in godbolt):

error: expression in new-declarator must have integral or enumeration type
    7 |     auto p1 = new int[d];
      |                       ^

I specifically labeled this C++14 because in C++11 mode clang treats this as ill-formed and produces the following diagnostic (see it live in godbolt):

error: array size expression must have integral or unscoped enumeration type, not 'double'
    auto p1 = new int[d];
              ^       ~

Is clang correct? If so what changed in C++14 to allow this?

  • 2
    Out of curiosity, a double allows for fractional quantities, so how would you allocate 0.75 of an integer, such as int * p_array = new int [0.75];? Or take something like 0.33333333, which is kind of difficult to allocate. – Thomas Matthews Dec 12 '18 at 15:13
  • 5
    @ThomasMatthews no this would end up being a float to integral conversion and would truncate the float – Shafik Yaghmour Dec 12 '18 at 15:59
  • 1
    @tomerzeitune Well, that (0.75 -> 0) is not what you wrote (0.75 -> 16360) ;) – Bob__ Dec 13 '18 at 9:50
  • 1
    @tomerzeitune Why int? Why not unsigned or long? – curiousguy Dec 13 '18 at 22:35
  • 1
    @KeithThompson I think the commenters are joking around – Shafik Yaghmour Dec 14 '18 at 18:11
43

Clang is correct, the key wording in [expr.new]p6 changes from the following in the C++11 draft:

Every constant-expression in a noptr-new-declarator shall be an integral constant expression ([expr.const]) and evaluate to a strictly positive value. The expression in a noptr-new-declarator shall be of integral type, unscoped enumeration type, or a class type for which a single non-explicit conversion function to integral or unscoped enumeration type exists ([class.conv]). If the expression is of class type, the expression is converted by calling that conversion function, and the result of the conversion is used in place of the original expression. …

to this in the C++14 draft:

Every constant-expression in a noptr-new-declarator shall be a converted constant expression ([expr.const]) of type std::size_t and shall evaluate to a strictly positive value. The expression in a noptr-new-declarator is implicitly converted to std::size_t. …

In C++14 the requirement for the expression in a noptr-new-declarator was weakened to not require an integral, unscoped enumeration or a class with a single non-explicit conversion function to one of those types but just allow implicit conversions to size_t.

The change in wording came from the proposal A Proposal to Tweak Certain C++ Contextual Conversions, v3.

  • 19
    I am dubious about the usefulness of allowing double to be used as the size of an array... it seems more likely to let bugs pass silently than anything else :( – Matthieu M. Dec 12 '18 at 15:48
  • 12
    @MatthieuM. I agree, I believe it is a defect and that the intent was really to say contextually implicitly converted. I am filing a defect report on this hopefully today but who knows maybe I am wrong :-( – Shafik Yaghmour Dec 12 '18 at 15:57
  • 2
    @MatthieuM. FYI I filed a defect report, processing takes a while so I don't expect to have an update anytime soon though. – Shafik Yaghmour Dec 14 '18 at 17:56
1

From to (for the ones that wonder like me), the phrasing remains practically the same (unlike from C++11 to C++14 as @ShafikYaghmour answered), as stated in this C++17 draft:

Every constant-expression in a noptr-new-declarator shall be a converted constant expression of type std::size_t and shall evaluate to a strictly positive value. The expression in a noptr-new-declarator is implicitly converted to std::size_t. [..]

with only this part ([expr.const]) missing from the C++17 draft.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.