1

I have a table, with types varchar, varchar, date, and date:

NAME | ID   | FROM       | THRU
Bob  | A123 | 10/30/2010 | 11/2/2010
Bob  | B567 | 10/30/2010 | 11/2/2010

I want to add a Date of Service (DOS) column that duplicates the rows and iterates for each day between, and including, the FROM and THRU dates. The finished table should look like this:

NAME | ID   | FROM       | THRU       | DOS
Bob  | A123 | 10/30/2010 | 11/02/2010 | 10/30/2010
Bob  | A123 | 10/30/2010 | 11/02/2010 | 10/31/2010
Bob  | A123 | 10/30/2010 | 11/02/2010 | 11/01/2010
Bob  | A123 | 10/30/2010 | 11/02/2010 | 11/02/2010
Bob  | B567 | 10/30/2010 | 11/02/2010 | 10/30/2010
Bob  | B567 | 10/30/2010 | 11/02/2010 | 10/31/2010
Bob  | B567 | 10/30/2010 | 11/02/2010 | 11/01/2010
Bob  | B567 | 10/30/2010 | 11/02/2010 | 11/02/2010

I saw another answer that used cte but did not retain the original date values and add a DOS column. How could I accomplish this in SQL Server?

  • 10/30 isn't a valid value for a datetime. The datetime datatype returns a value accurate to 1/300th of a second, not, well, not sure what that is; month/day (so, for what year?), month/year (so what day?)? What are the real values you have, or the real datatypes? If you really are storing dates in a format like MM/dd then that is going to be impossible to work with when you go from one year to another. – Larnu Dec 12 '18 at 16:15
  • @Larnu you are right. I added a year value to be more clear and changed datetime to date. – FreqTime Dec 12 '18 at 16:18
  • This is a great usecase for a calendar table (A calendar table will have a row for each date and it will contain all dates). There are a lot of resources online on how to quickly create one. Once you have that you can just join to your existing table like SELECT yourtable.*, calendartable.calendardate FROM yourtable WHERE calendartable.calendardate BETWEEN yourtable.FROM and yourtable.THRU – JNevill Dec 12 '18 at 16:23
3

I think a calendar table is not quite the right tool here. Since you want sequential dates a tally table seems like a good way to go.

First let's setup your data.

declare @Something table
(
    NAME varchar(10)
    , ID varchar(10)
    , DateFrom date
    , THRU date
)

insert @Something values
('Bob', 'A123', '20101030', '20101102')
, ('Bob', 'B567', '20101030', '20101102')

Next we need our tally table. I keep one as a view on my system and it is blistering fast with zero reads. Feel free to adjust the row count to suit your needs.

create View [dbo].[cteTally] as

WITH
    E1(N) AS (select 1 from (values (1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1))dt(n)),
    E2(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E1 a, E1 b), --10E+2 or 100 rows
    E4(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E2 a, E2 b), --10E+4 or 10,000 rows max
    cteTally(N) AS 
    (
        SELECT  ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) FROM E4
    )
select N from cteTally

Now the query for your situation is pretty simple.

select s.Name
    , s.ID
    , s.DateFrom
    , s.THRU
    , DOS = DATEADD(day, t.N - 1, DateFrom)
from @Something s
join cteTally t on t.N <= datediff(day, DateFrom, THRU) + 1
order by s.Name
    , s.ID
    , t.N
  • My table has over 750 million rows. Would a calendar table or a tally table be faster for such a large table? – FreqTime Dec 12 '18 at 16:51
  • Probably doesn't make much difference. Either way you are joining 750 million rows to another table to increase the row count quite a bit. – Sean Lange Dec 12 '18 at 16:52
2

Sounds like you need a Calendar table. Then it becomes as simple as something like:

SELECT YT.Name,
       YT.ID,
       YT.[From],
       YT.Thru,
       CT.CalendarDate AS DOS
FROM dbo.YourTable YT
     JOIN dbo.CalendarTable CT ON CONVERT(date,YT.[From]) <= CT.CalendarDate
                              AND CONVERT(date,YT.Thru) >= CT.CalendarDate;

Note, I have used my own Calendar table, does not have the same column (names) as the link, however, the link gives all the information need on how to design one. YOu would simply need to ensure you use the column names appropriate for your table.

2

If you don't have a Calendar table (highly recommended), another option is an ad-hoc tally table

Example

Select A.* 
      ,DOS = B.D
 From  YourTable A
 Cross Apply (
                Select Top (DateDiff(DAY,[FROM],[THRU])+1) D=DateAdd(DAY,-1+Row_Number() Over (Order By (Select Null)),[FROM]) 
                  From  master..spt_values n1,master..spt_values n2
             ) B

Returns

NAME    ID      FROM        THRU        DOS
Bob     A123    2010-10-30  2010-11-02  2010-10-30
Bob     A123    2010-10-30  2010-11-02  2010-10-31
Bob     A123    2010-10-30  2010-11-02  2010-11-01
Bob     A123    2010-10-30  2010-11-02  2010-11-02
Bob     B567    2010-10-30  2010-11-02  2010-10-30
Bob     B567    2010-10-30  2010-11-02  2010-10-31
Bob     B567    2010-10-30  2010-11-02  2010-11-01
Bob     B567    2010-10-30  2010-11-02  2010-11-02
  • 1
    Looks quite similar to mine. +1 – Sean Lange Dec 12 '18 at 16:43
  • @SeanLange Apples and Oranges :) You've got a join and I've got a CROSS APPLY. However, I'm willing to bet your's will be more performatn. +1 – John Cappelletti Dec 12 '18 at 16:52
  • If it is it probably can't be detected on this small dataset. The only performance difference is in creating the tally table. Between us we have 2 of the 4 or more "correct" answers. :) – Sean Lange Dec 12 '18 at 16:54
  • @SeanLange A burden we must bear. – John Cappelletti Dec 12 '18 at 16:55
2

I often use recursive CTEs for this sort of thing:

with cte as (
      select t.ame, t.id, t.from, t.thru, t.from as dos
      from t
      union all
      select cte.ame, cte.id, cte.from, cte.thur, dateadd(day, 1, dos)
      from cte
      where dos < t.thru
     )
select cte.*
from cte
option (maxrecursion 0);
  • 2
    No big deal if the range is small but for large ranges (somewhere around 1,000) this can really get bogged down. Recursive ctes to generate sequential values is really hidden RBAR. sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/74118 – Sean Lange Dec 12 '18 at 16:42
  • @SeanLange . . . The problem is that when you get into large ranges, joins can also take a long time. A good place to start with this (in my opinion) are Aaron Bertrand's measurements (sqlperformance.com/2013/01/t-sql-queries/generate-a-set-1). My preference is because this is standard SQL, doesn't require additional tables, and works for any number of values. I would not claim that this is the fastest performing method. – Gordon Linoff Dec 12 '18 at 16:46
  • In his article the recursive cte is the second slowest option he tested. – Sean Lange Dec 12 '18 at 16:49
  • I have never given much credo to standard ANSI compliant sql. In my 20 years in the business I have switched databases for a system exactly zero times. And even if that happened there would be some many other things that would need to happen. I use the recursive cte technique with a view so it isn't stored anywhere and is lightning fast. – Sean Lange Dec 12 '18 at 16:51
0

You can create the Date of Service as a calculated column. To increment the date you can try this:

SELECT DATEADD(day, 1, '2017/08/25') AS DateAdd;
  • 2
    How does this answer their question? They want every date between FROM and THRU. – Sean Lange Dec 12 '18 at 16:32
  • 2
    How does this generate the extra rows? An expression like this provides an extra column, not extra rows. – Larnu Dec 12 '18 at 16:32
0

Seems like a CROSS APPLY will do the job

CREATE TABLE T(
  [NAME] varchar(3), 
  [ID] varchar(4), 
  [FROM] datetime, 
  [THRU] datetime
);

INSERT INTO T
    ([NAME], [ID], [FROM], [THRU])
VALUES
    ('Bob', 'A123', '2001-10-30 00:00:00', '2001-11-02 00:00:00'),
    ('Bob', 'B567', '2001-10-30 00:00:00', '2001-11-02 00:00:00');

SELECT T.*,
       DATEADD(Day, TT.N, [FROM]) DOS
FROM T CROSS APPLY (VALUES (0), (1), (2), (3)) TT(N)

Returns:

+------+------+---------------------+---------------------+---------------------+
| NAME |  ID  |        FROM         |        THRU         |         DOS         |
+------+------+---------------------+---------------------+---------------------+
| Bob  | A123 | 30/10/2001 00:00:00 | 02/11/2001 00:00:00 | 30/10/2001 00:00:00 |
| Bob  | A123 | 30/10/2001 00:00:00 | 02/11/2001 00:00:00 | 31/10/2001 00:00:00 |
| Bob  | A123 | 30/10/2001 00:00:00 | 02/11/2001 00:00:00 | 01/11/2001 00:00:00 |
| Bob  | A123 | 30/10/2001 00:00:00 | 02/11/2001 00:00:00 | 02/11/2001 00:00:00 |
| Bob  | B567 | 30/10/2001 00:00:00 | 02/11/2001 00:00:00 | 30/10/2001 00:00:00 |
| Bob  | B567 | 30/10/2001 00:00:00 | 02/11/2001 00:00:00 | 31/10/2001 00:00:00 |
| Bob  | B567 | 30/10/2001 00:00:00 | 02/11/2001 00:00:00 | 01/11/2001 00:00:00 |
| Bob  | B567 | 30/10/2001 00:00:00 | 02/11/2001 00:00:00 | 02/11/2001 00:00:0  |
+------+------+---------------------+---------------------+---------------------+

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.