37

I already make twice same bug in code like following:

void Foo(Guid appId, Guid accountId, Guid paymentId, Guid whateverId)
{
...
}

Guid appId = ....;
Guid accountId = ...;
Guid paymentId = ...;
Guid whateverId =....;

//BUG - parameters are swapped - but compiler compiles it
Foo(appId, paymentId, accountId, whateverId);

OK, I want to prevent these bugs, so I created strongly typed GUIDs:

[ImmutableObject(true)]
public struct AppId
{
    private readonly Guid _value;

    public AppId(string value)
    {            
        var val = Guid.Parse(value);
        CheckValue(val);
        _value = val;
    }      

    public AppId(Guid value)
    {
        CheckValue(value);
        _value = value;           
    }

    private static void CheckValue(Guid value)
    {
        if(value == Guid.Empty)
            throw new ArgumentException("Guid value cannot be empty", nameof(value));
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _value.ToString();
    }
}

And another one for PaymentId:

[ImmutableObject(true)]
public struct PaymentId
{
    private readonly Guid _value;

    public PaymentId(string value)
    {            
        var val = Guid.Parse(value);
        CheckValue(val);
        _value = val;
    }      

    public PaymentId(Guid value)
    {
        CheckValue(value);
        _value = value;           
    }

    private static void CheckValue(Guid value)
    {
        if(value == Guid.Empty)
            throw new ArgumentException("Guid value cannot be empty", nameof(value));
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _value.ToString();
    }
}

These structs are almost same, there is a lot of duplication of code. Isn't is?

I cannot figure out any elegant way to solve it except using class instead of struct. I would rather use struct, because of null checks, less memory footprint, no garbage collector overhead etc...

Do you have some idea how to use struct without duplicating code?

  • 1
    Interesting need. I have a question. Leaving the code duplication aside, when you wanted to create one of those structs, you must initialize them with something. How do you make sure they are initialized with the right thing? As in..var appIdStruct=new AppId(paymentId) should not compile – bbeda Dec 12 '18 at 17:55
  • I cannot guarantee it. I cannot check everything. Even then space for bugs will decrease a bit. – Tomas Kubes Dec 12 '18 at 18:00
  • 1
    From that point of view, I think the space for bugs is the same, you are only moving the source to a different place. Also, you are complicating things which will actually increase that space long term. Are you planning to allocate lots of those? Will they live long in memory? – bbeda Dec 12 '18 at 18:05
  • Not much, but null checks are also good reason for structs. – Tomas Kubes Dec 12 '18 at 18:11
  • Have you considered creating a Params Class like FooParams and passing it to the function, and then if you are really using meaningful variable names, a misassignment would stand out and would be easy to catch like fooParams.PaymentId = accountId; – hazimdikenli Jan 2 at 7:53
44

First off, this is a really good idea. A brief aside:

I wish C# made it easier to create cheap typed wrappers around integers, strings, ids, and so on. We are very "string happy" and "integer happy" as programmers; lots of things are represented as strings and integers which could have more information tracked in the type system; we don't want to be assigning customer names to customer addresses. A while back I wrote a series of blog posts (never finished!) about writing a virtual machine in OCaml, and one of the best things I did was wrapped every integer in the virtual machine with a type that indicates its purpose. That prevented so many bugs! OCaml makes it very easy to create little wrapper types; C# does not.

Second, I would not worry too much about duplicating the code. It's mostly an easy copy-paste, and you are unlikely to edit the code much or make mistakes. Spend your time solving real problems. A little copy-pasted code is not a big deal.

If you do want to avoid the copy-pasted code, then I would suggest using generics like this:

struct App {}
struct Payment {}

[ImmutableObject(true)]
public struct Id<T>
{
    private readonly Guid _value;
    public Id(string value)
    {            
        var val = Guid.Parse(value);
        CheckValue(val);
        _value = val;
    }

    public Id(Guid value)
    {
        CheckValue(value);
        _value = value;           
    }

    private static void CheckValue(Guid value)
    {
        if(value == Guid.Empty)
            throw new ArgumentException("Guid value cannot be empty", nameof(value));
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _value.ToString();
    }
}

And now you're done. You have types Id<App> and Id<Payment> instead of AppId and PaymentId, but you still cannot assign an Id<App> to Id<Payment> or Guid.

Also, if you like using AppId and PaymentId then at the top of your file you can say

using AppId = MyNamespace.Whatever.Id<MyNamespace.Whatever.App>

and so on.

Third, you will probably need a few more features in your type; I assume this is not done yet. For example, you'll probably need equality, so that you can check to see if two ids are the same.

Fourth, be aware that default(Id<App>) still gives you an "empty guid" identifier, so your attempt to prevent that does not actually work; it will still be possible to create one. There is not really a good way around that.

  • "There is not really a good way around that." Is there a bad way? – BurnsBA Dec 12 '18 at 18:56
  • 2
    @BurnsBA: If it hurts when you do that, don't do it! :-) – Eric Lippert Dec 12 '18 at 19:38
  • 1
    Do you think it would be useful to have a conversion to Guid defined for the type, or to have a public read-only property exposing the Guid? This would be useful for interfacing persistence frameworks, where the “raw” Guid is required. – dasblinkenlight Dec 13 '18 at 3:02
  • 2
    @dasblinkenlight: That seems like a reasonable choice. Maybe an explicit conversion to and from Guid would be useful. – Eric Lippert Dec 13 '18 at 3:28
  • 2
    A small interesting piece of information: A type that is used in the way that T is in this code is called a phantom type in the context of functional programming: It is used as a type parameter, but there is never a value of type T. – Lii Dec 17 '18 at 10:50
3

We do the same, it works great.

Yes, it's a lot of copy and paste, but that is exactly what code-generation is for.

In Visual Studio, you can use T4 templates for this. You basically write your class once and then have a template where you say "I want this class for App, Payment, Account,..." and Visual Studio will generate you one source code file for each.

That way you have one single source (The T4 template) where you can make changes if you find a bug in your classes and it will propagate to all your Identifiers without you having to think about changing all of them.

-6

You might be able to use subclassing with a different programming language.

  • All structure types are required to inherit from ValueType and nothing else. – supercat Dec 18 '18 at 20:16
  • Oh. Could you use a class instead? – Solomon Ucko Dec 18 '18 at 20:17
  • @SolomonUcko classes can't inherit from struct. – Andrey Dec 19 '18 at 0:39
  • Could Guid be a class? – Solomon Ucko Dec 19 '18 at 0:41
  • If Guid is class, it would consume more memory, it would be managed by garbage collector and it would be nullable (null checks problems). – Tomas Kubes Dec 19 '18 at 8:13

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