201

Consider the following example:

class Quirky {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int x = 1;
        int y = 3;

        System.out.println(x == (x = y)); // false
        x = 1; // reset
        System.out.println((x = y) == x); // true
     }
}

I'm not sure if there is an item in the Java Language Specification that dictates loading the previous value of a variable for comparison with the right side (x = y) which, by the order implied by brackets, should be calculated first.

Why does the first expression evaluate to false, but the second evaluate to true? I would have expected (x = y) to be evaluated first, and then it would compare x with itself (3) and return true.


This question is different from order of evaluation of subexpressions in a Java expression in that x is definitely not a 'subexpression' here. It needs to be loaded for the comparison rather than to be 'evaluated'. The question is Java-specific and the expression x == (x = y), unlike far-fetched impractical constructs commonly crafted for tricky interview questions, came from a real project. It was supposed to be a one-line replacement for the compare-and-replace idiom

int oldX = x;
x = y;
return oldX == y;

which, being even simpler than x86 CMPXCHG instruction, deserved a shorter expression in Java.

  • 62
    The left hand side is always evaluated before the right hand side. The brackets don't make a difference to that. – Louis Wasserman Dec 12 '18 at 19:12
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    Evaluating the expression x = y is certainly relevant, and causes the side effect that x is set to the value of y. – Louis Wasserman Dec 12 '18 at 19:18
  • 49
    Do yourself and your teammates a favor and don't mix state mutation into the same line as state examination. Doing so drastically reduces the readability of your code. (There are some cases where it's absolutely necessary because of atomicity requirements, but functions for those already exist and their purpose would be instantly recognized.) – jpmc26 Dec 12 '18 at 22:02
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    The real question is why you want to write code like this. – klutt Dec 13 '18 at 3:13
  • 25
    The key to your question is your false belief that parentheses imply evaluation order. That is a common belief because of how we're taught math in elementary school and because some beginner programming books still get it wrong, but it is a false belief. This is a pretty frequent question. You might benefit from reading my articles on the subject; they are about C# but they apply to Java: ericlippert.com/2008/05/23/precedence-vs-associativity-vs-order ericlippert.com/2009/08/10/precedence-vs-order-redux – Eric Lippert Dec 13 '18 at 14:12

14 Answers 14

96

which, by the order implied by brackets, should be calculated first

No. It is a common misconception that parentheses have any (general) effect on calculation or evaluation order. They only coerce the parts of your expression into a particular tree, binding the right operands to the right operations for the job.

(And, if you don't use them, this information comes from the "precedence" and associativity of the operators, something that's a result of how the language's syntax tree is defined. In fact, this is still exactly how it works when you use parentheses, but we simplify and say that we're not relying on any precedence rules then.)

Once that's done (i.e. once your code has been parsed into a program) those operands still need to be evaluated, and there are separate rules about how that is done: said rules (as Andrew has shown us) state that the LHS of each operation is evaluated first in Java.

Note that this is not the case in all languages; for example, in C++, unless you're using a short-circuiting operator like && or ||, the evaluation order of operands is generally unspecified and you shouldn't rely on it either way.

Teachers need to stop explaining operator precedence using misleading phrases like "this makes the addition happen first". Given an expression x * y + z the proper explanation would be "operator precedence makes the addition happen between x * y and z, rather than between y and z", with no mention of any "order".

  • 6
    I wish my teachers had made some separation between the underlying math and the syntax they used to represent it, like if we spent a day with Roman numerals or Polish notation or whatever and saw that addition has the same properties. We learned associativity and all those properties in middle school, so there was plenty of time. – John P Dec 13 '18 at 22:57
  • 1
    Glad you mentioned that this rule doesn't hold true for all languages. Also, if either side has another side-effect, like writing to a file, or reading the current time, it is (even in Java) undefined in what order that happens. However, the result of the comparison will be as if it was evaluated left-to-right (in Java). Another aside: quite a few languages simply disallow mixing assignment and comparison this way by syntax rules, and the issue wouldn't arise. – Abel Dec 15 '18 at 20:38
  • 5
    @JohnP: It gets worse. Does 5*4 mean 5+5+5+5 or 4+4+4+4+4 ? Some teachers insist that only one of those choices is right. – Brian Dec 18 '18 at 14:15
  • 3
    @Brian But... but... multiplication of real numbers is commutative! – Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 18 '18 at 14:18
  • 2
    In my world of thinking, a pair of parentheses represents "is needed for". Calculating ´a*(b+c)´, the parentheses would express that the result of the addition is needed for the multiplication. Any implicit operator preferences can be expressed by parens, except LHS-first or RHS-first rules. (Is that true?) @Brian In math there are a few rare cases where multiplication can be substituted by repeated addition but that is by far not always true (starting with complex numbers but not limited to). So your educators should really have an eye on what the are telling people.... – syck Dec 19 '18 at 15:35
161

== is a binary equality operator.

The left-hand operand of a binary operator appears to be fully evaluated before any part of the right-hand operand is evaluated.

Java 11 Specification > Evaluation Order > Evaluate Left-Hand Operand First

  • 42
    The wording "appears to be" doesn't sound like they're sure, tbh. – Mr Lister Dec 13 '18 at 9:44
  • 86
    "appears to be" means the specification does not require that the operations are actually carried out in that order chronologically, but it requires that you get the same result that you would get if they were. – Robyn Dec 13 '18 at 10:45
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    @MrLister "appears to be" appears to be a poor word choice on their part. By "appear" they mean "manifest as a phenomenon to the developer". "is effectively" may be a better phrase. – Kelvin Dec 13 '18 at 17:03
  • 18
    in the C++ community this is the equivalent to the "as-if" rule... the operand is required to behave "as if" it was implemented per the following rules, even if technically it is not. – Michael Edenfield Dec 13 '18 at 21:33
  • 2
    @Kelvin I agree, I would have chosen that word either, rather than "appears to be". – MC Emperor Dec 14 '18 at 8:23
149

As LouisWasserman said, the expression is evaluated left to right. And java doesn't care what "evaluate" actually does, it only cares about generating a (non volatile, final) value to work with.

//the example values
x = 1;
y = 3;

So to calculate the first output of System.out.println(), the following is done:

x == (x = y)
1 == (x = y)
1 == (x = 3) //assign 3 to x, returns 3
1 == 3
false

and to calculate the second:

(x = y) == x
(x = 3) == x //assign 3 to x, returns 3
3 == x
3 == 3
true

Note that the second value will always evaluate to true, regardless of the initial values of x and y, because you are effectively comparing the assignment of a value to the variable it is assigned to, and a = b and b will, evaluated in that order, always be the same by definition.

  • "Left to right" is also true in math, by the way, just when you get to a parentheses or precedence, you iterate inside them and eval everything inside left to right before going any further on the main tier. But math would never do this; the distinction only matters because this is not an equation but a combo operation, doing both an assignment and an equation in one swoop. I would never do this because readability is poor, unless I was doing code golf or was looking for a way to optimize performance, and then, there would be comments. – Harper Dec 16 '18 at 18:54
25

I'm not sure if there is an item in the Java Language Specification that dictates loading the previous value of a variable...

There is. Next time you are unclear what the specification says, please read the specification and then ask the question if it is unclear.

... the right side (x = y) which, by the order implied by brackets, should be calculated first.

That statement is false. Parentheses do not imply an order of evaluation. In Java, the order of evaluation is left to right, regardless of parentheses. Parentheses determine where the subexpression boundaries are, not the order of evaluation.

Why does the first expression evaluate to false, but the second evaluate to true?

The rule for the == operator is: evaluate the left side to produce a value, evaluate the right side to produce a value, compare the values, the comparison is the value of the expression.

In other words, the meaning of expr1 == expr2 is always the same as though you had written temp1 = expr1; temp2 = expr2; and then evaluated temp1 == temp2.

The rule for the = operator with a local variable on the left side is: evaluate the left side to produce a variable, evaluate the right side to produce a value, perform the assignment, the result is the value that was assigned.

So put it together:

x == (x = y)

We have a comparison operator. Evaluate the left side to produce a value -- we get the current value of x. Evaluate the right side: that's an assignment so we evaluate the left side to produce a variable -- the variable x -- we evaluate the right side -- the current value of y -- assign it to x, and the result is the assigned value. We then compare the original value of x to the value that was assigned.

You can do (x = y) == x as an exercise. Again, remember, all the rules for evaluating the left side happen before all the rules of evaluating the right side.

I would have expected (x = y) to be evaluated first, and then it would compare x with itself (3) and return true.

Your expectation is based on a set of incorrect beliefs about the rules of Java. Hopefully you now have correct beliefs and will in the future expect true things.

This question is different from "order of evaluation of subexpressions in a Java expression"

This statement is false. That question is totally germane.

x is definitely not a 'subexpression' here.

This statement is also false. It is a subexpression twice in each example.

It needs to be loaded for the comparison rather than to be 'evaluated'.

I have no idea what this means.

Apparently you still have many false beliefs. My advice is that you read the specification until your false beliefs are replaced by true beliefs.

The question is Java-specific and the expression x == (x = y), unlike far-fetched impractical constructs commonly crafted for tricky interview questions, came from a real project.

The provenance of the expression is not relevant to the question. The rules for such expressions are clearly described in the specification; read it!

It was supposed to be a one-line replacement for the compare-and-replace idiom

Since that one-line replacement caused a great deal of confusion in you, the reader of the code, I would suggest that it was a poor choice. Making the code more concise but harder to understand is not a win. It is unlikely to make the code faster.

Incidentally, C# has compare and replace as a library method, which can be jitted down to a machine instruction. I believe Java does not have such a method, as it cannot be represented in the Java type system.

  • 8
    If anyone could go through the whole JLS, then there would be no reason to publish Java books and at least half of this site would be useless too. – John McClane Dec 14 '18 at 23:09
  • 8
    @JohnMcClane: I assure you, there is no difficulty whatsoever in going through the entire specification, but also, you don't have to. The Java specification begins with a helpful "table of contents" which will help you quickly get to the parts you are most interested in. It's also online and keyword searchable. That said, you are correct: there are lots of good resources that will help you learn how Java works; my advice to you is that you make use of them! – Eric Lippert Dec 14 '18 at 23:38
  • 8
    This answer is unnecessarily condescending and rude. Remember: be nice. – walen Dec 19 '18 at 9:23
  • 7
    @LuisG.: No condescension is intended or implied; we are all here to learn from each other, and I am not recommending anything I have not done myself when I was a beginner. Nor is it rude. Clearly and unambiguously identifying their false beliefs is a kindness to the original poster. Hiding behind "politeness" and allowing people to continue to have false beliefs is unhelpful, and reinforces bad habits of thought. – Eric Lippert Dec 19 '18 at 14:41
  • 5
    @LuisG.: I used to write a blog about the design of JavaScript, and the most helpful comments I ever got were from Brendan pointing out clearly and unambiguously where I got it wrong. That was great and I appreciated him taking the time, because I then lived the next 20 years of my life not repeating that mistake in my own work, or worse, teaching it to others. It also gave me the opportunity to correct those same false beliefs in others by using myself as an example of how people come to believe false things. – Eric Lippert Dec 19 '18 at 14:46
16

It is related to operator precedence and how operators are getting evaluated.

Parentheses '()' has higher precedence and has associativity left to right. Equality '==' come next in this question and has associativity left to right. Assignment '=' come last and has associativity right to left.

System use stack to evaluate expression. Expression gets evaluated left to right.

Now comes to original question:

int x = 1;
int y = 3;
System.out.println(x == (x = y)); // false

First x(1) will be pushed to stack. then inner (x = y) will be evaluated and pushed to stack with value x(3). Now x(1) will be compared against x(3) so result is false.

x = 1; // reset
System.out.println((x = y) == x); // true

Here, (x = y) will be evaluated, now x value become 3 and x(3) will be pushed to stack. Now x(3) with changed value after equality will be pushed to stack. Now expression will be evaluated and both will be same so result is true.

12

It is not the same. The left hand side will always be evaluated before the right hand side, and the brackets don't specify an order of execution, but a grouping of commands.

With:

      x == (x = y)

You are basically doing the same as:

      x == y

And x will have the value of y after the comparison.

While with:

      (x = y) == x

You are basically doing the same as:

      x == x

After x took y's value. And it will always return true.

9

In the first test you're checking does 1 == 3.

In the second test your checking does 3 == 3.

(x = y) assigns the value and that value is tested. In the former example x = 1 first then x is assigned 3. Does 1 == 3?

In the latter, x is assigned 3, and obviously it's still 3. Does 3 == 3?

8

Consider this other, maybe simpler example:

int x = 1;
System.out.println(x == ++x); // false
x = 1; // reset
System.out.println(++x == x); // true

Here, the pre-increment operator in ++x must be applied before the comparison is made — just like (x = y) in your example must be calculated before the comparison.

However, expression evaluation still happens left → to → right, so the first comparison is actually 1 == 2 while the second is 2 == 2.
The same thing happens in your example.

8

Expressions are evaluated from left to right. In this case:

int x = 1;
int y = 3;

x == (x = y)) // false
x ==    t

- left x = 1
- let t = (x = y) => x = 3
- x == (x = y)
  x == t
  1 == 3 //false

(x = y) == x); // true
   t    == x

- left (x = y) => x = 3
           t    =      3 
-  (x = y) == x
-     t    == x
-     3    == 3 //true
5

Basically the first statement x had it's value 1 So Java compares 1 == to new x variable which won't be the same

In the second one you said x=y which means the value of x changed and so when you call it again it'll be the same value hence why it's true and x ==x

3

== is a comparison equality operator and it works from left to right.

x == (x = y);

here the old assigned value of x is compared with new assign value of x, (1==3)//false

(x = y) == x;

Whereas, here new assign value of x is compared with the new holding value of x assigned to it just before comparison, (3==3)//true

Now consider this

    System.out.println((8 + (5 * 6)) * 9);
    System.out.println(8 + (5 * 6) * 9);
    System.out.println((8 + 5) * 6 * 9);
    System.out.println((8 + (5) * 6) * 9);
    System.out.println(8 + 5 * 6 * 9);

Output:

342

278

702

342

278

Thus, Parentheses plays its major role in arithmetic expressions only not in comparison expressions.

  • 1
    The conclusion is wrong. The behavior is not different between arithmetic and comparison operators. x + (x = y) and (x = y) + x would show similar behavior as the original with comparison operators. – JJJ Dec 22 '18 at 18:28
  • 1
    @JJJ In x+(x=y) and (x=y)+x there is no comparison involved, it is just assigning y value to x and adding it to x. – Nisrin Dhoondia Dec 23 '18 at 2:28
  • 1
    ...yes, that is the point. "Parentheses plays its major role in arithmetic expressions only not in comparison expressions" is wrong because there is no difference between arithmetic and comparison expressions. – JJJ Dec 23 '18 at 7:40
2

The thing here is the arithmatic operators/relational operators precedency order out of the two operators = vs == the dominant one is == (Relational Operators dominates ) as it precedes = assignment operators. Despite precedence, the order of evaluation is LTR (LEFT TO RIGHT) precedence comes into picture after evaluation order. So, Irrespective of any constraints evaluation is LTR.

  • 1
    The answer is wrong. Operator precedence doesn't affect evaluation order. Read some of the top-voted answers for explanation, especially this one. – JJJ Dec 28 '18 at 22:18
  • 1
    Correct, its actually the way we are taught the illusion of restrictions on precedence comes n all those things but correctly pointed it has no impact coz the order of evaluation remains left to right – Himanshu Ahuja Dec 28 '18 at 22:31
-1

It is easy in the second comparison on the left is assignment after assigning y to x (on the left) you then comparing 3 == 3. In the first example you are comparing x = 1 with new assign x = 3. It seems that there is always taken current state reading statements from left to right of x.

-2

The kind of question you asked is a very good question if you want to write a Java compiler, or test programs to verify that a Java compiler is working correctly. In Java, these two expressions must produce the results that you saw. In C++, for example, they don't have to - so if someone reused parts of a C++ compiler in their Java compiler, you might theoretically find that the compiler doesn't behave as it should.

As a software developer, writing code that is readable, understandable and maintainable, both versions of your code would be considered awful. To understand what the code does, one has to know exactly how the Java language is defined. Someone who writes both Java and C++ code would shudder looking at the code. If you have to ask why a single line of code does what it does, then you should avoid that code. (I suppose and hope that the guys who answered your "why" question correctly will themselves avoid that ind of code as well).

  • "To understand what the code does, one has to know exactly how the Java language is defined." But what if every coworker consider it a common sense? – BinaryTreeee Dec 25 '18 at 16:04

protected by Josh Crozier Dec 14 '18 at 5:36

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