5

I try to make a generic cross product function :

template<class ContainerType1, class ContainerType2, typename ReturnType>
std::vector<ReturnType> cross_product(const ContainerType1& a, const ContainerType2& b) 
{
  assert((a.size()==3)&&(b.size==3));

  return {a[1]*b[2]-a[2]-b[1], a[2]*b[0]-a[0]*b[2], a[0]*b[1]-a[1]*b[0]};
}

the line

std::vector<double> A = cross_product(p_r2,p_r1);

give me the error :

error : couldn't deduce template parameter ‘ReturnType’

Is there a way to keep the genericity, and avoid to declare ReturnType as, for example, double ?

  • b.size --> b.size() - And perhaps it'd be better to use a container with static size. Because that assertion may be removed – StoryTeller Dec 13 '18 at 9:04
  • that's a first mistake, thanks. For the static size container, maybe ... i have to look at that ... But my initial problem stay the same. – Kafka Dec 13 '18 at 9:10
  • also a[1]*b[2]-a[2]-b[1] has different operations to a[2]*b[0]-a[0]*b[2] and a[0]*b[1]-a[1]*b[0] (two subtractions vs two multiplications) – Caleth Dec 13 '18 at 10:12
8

If your container types follow the design of the standard library, they will have a value_type member alias. You can deduce the common type from that:

template<class ContainerType1, class ContainerType2>
auto cross_product(const ContainerType1& a, const ContainerType2& b) ->
    std::vector<
        typename std::common_type<
            typename ContainerType1::value_type,
            typename ContainerType2::value_type
        >::type
    >
{
    assert((a.size()==3) && (b.size()==3));
    return {a[1]*b[2]-a[2]-b[1], a[2]*b[0]-a[0]*b[2], a[0]*b[1]-a[1]*b[0]};
}
  • it works fine, thank you – Kafka Dec 13 '18 at 9:18
  • Note the difference between std::common_type and decltype, integral promotion, and "custom" type which has wanted operator but not necessary the common type (complex<T>). – Jarod42 Dec 13 '18 at 11:06
  • @Jarod42 - std::common_type is specified in terms of ?:. For class types like std::complex it will try to find an implicit conversion sequence. – StoryTeller Dec 13 '18 at 11:10
  • But yeah, heavy duty gun compared to simply using decltype. – StoryTeller Dec 13 '18 at 11:11
  • char/char would do char for you, int with decltype. and for custom type, complex was a (bad?) example, whereas common_type of complex<float> and double works, operator* fails (so difference between both again ;-) ). – Jarod42 Dec 13 '18 at 11:26
8

Consider using Class template argument deduction, and writing:

template<class ContainerType1, class ContainerType2>
auto cross_product(const ContainerType1& a, const ContainerType2& b) 
{
  assert((a.size()==3)&&(b.size()==3));

  return std::vector{a[1]*b[2]-a[2]-b[1], a[2]*b[0]-a[0]*b[2], a[0]*b[1]-a[1]*b[0]};
}

Or, before C++ 17, using decltype to get the type of the values:

template<class ContainerType1, class ContainerType2>
auto cross_product(const ContainerType1& a, const ContainerType2& b)
    -> std::vector<decltype(a[0] * b[0] - a[0] - b[0])>
{
  assert((a.size()==3)&&(b.size()==3));

  return {a[1]*b[2]-a[2]-b[1], a[2]*b[0]-a[0]*b[2], a[0]*b[1]-a[1]*b[0]};
}
  • The C++11 solution is a very nice alternative to the exceptionally heavy gun my mind jumped to. – StoryTeller Dec 13 '18 at 9:32

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