30

I'm trying to simplify the following:

function handleDirection(src) {
  if (src === 'left') {
    if (inverse) {
      tracker--;
    } else {
      tracker++;
    }
  } else {
    if (inverse) {
      tracker++;
    } else {
      tracker--;
    }
  }
}

to reduce the number of conditionals. The src will either be 'left' or 'right' always.

  • 10
    There's now a range of answers - one thing to bear in mind with this sort of thing is maintainability, that includes whether you yourself will understand what this code does next week. Make sure you pick a form of logic that is clear to you what it's doing at a glance - if that's the long form in your original question, stick with it. – James Thorpe Dec 13 '18 at 10:31
  • 14
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it belongs to codereview.stackexchange.com – Gabriele Petrioli Dec 13 '18 at 10:33
  • 10
    Side note: your function uses 3 variables (src, inverse and tracker) but it has only 1 parameter (src) and no return value. For that reason it would not pass my code review, regardless of how you structure the ifs.... – Peter B Dec 13 '18 at 10:34
  • 1
    @PeterB I'd generally agree, but it's worth noting that context is key. If this were a method in an object, then it might be fine. This could be manipulating some sort of cursor (tracker) via commands ("left"/"right"), the object itself has a flag that it would be moved in the opposite direction (invert). However, as a free-floating function, that's indeed bad, as you're manipulating some not necessarily related global states. – VLAZ Dec 13 '18 at 10:44
  • 1
    Thanks all—it is a free-floating function currently; the main purpose of me asking this question is to capture the most efficient method of writing this conditional. I often find that it's the simpler things like this that trip me up, so asking this question now before I delve further is useful. The answers below are all interesting approaches which I must test. – Rebecca O'Sullivan Dec 13 '18 at 11:01

13 Answers 13

51

You could check with the result of the first check.

This is an exclusive OR check.

// typeof inverse === 'boolean'

function handleDirection(src) {
    if (src === 'left' === inverse) {
        tracker--;
    } else {
        tracker++;
    }
}

The check evaluates the expression in this order (src === 'left') === inverse:

src === 'left' === inverse
---- first ---             returns a boolean value
--------- second --------- take result of former check & compairs it with another boolean
  • 2
    ^^ only in this special case – Nina Scholz Dec 13 '18 at 10:33
  • 1
    Ah, makes sense I suppose (bool) == (condition_met) .. +2 skill points to efficiency! thank you :) – treyBake Dec 13 '18 at 10:40
  • 7
    I definitely agree with @marcelm. As wonderful as this answer looks, it is not immediately obvious what is happening. – Marie Dec 13 '18 at 16:18
  • 5
    I'd use this only if you really need the performance boost and/or only work with people who'd be able to intuitively read this and come up with this. The other approach maybe longer, but it's much more readable to the average developer. – Frank Hopkins Dec 13 '18 at 16:21
  • 1
    @afe If you're doing it with the ternary operator, I think an increment (tracker += (src == 'left') == inverse ? -1 : +1;) is a little clearer – Charlie Harding Dec 13 '18 at 17:05
18
function handleDirection(src) {
   var movement = 1;
   if(src === 'left')
     movement = -1;

   if(inverse)
     tracker += movement;
   else
     tracker -= movement;
}
  • 2
    This creates an unnecessary extra variable imo... Using tracker-- and tracker++ is the correct way to increase and decrease the variable in this case. If it were desired to increase or lower the variable with more than one this might be a good guideline. – MagicLegend Dec 13 '18 at 11:01
  • 3
    @MagicLegend Actually, I think the variable helps bring "real world" parity to the solution. The other answers focus on "efficiency" which is probably irrelevant in such a simple case. The interpreter doesn't need help reading, but humans do. Although I upvoted, I would go further and give the variable a more meaningful name like adjustment or movement. – TheRubberDuck Dec 13 '18 at 16:41
11

You can even do it with just one line of Code:

function getDirectionOffset(src) {
  tracker += (src === 'left' ? 1 : -1) * (inverse ? -1 : 1);
}
7

This could be simplified to a ternary expression which returns 1 or -1 depending on the state. Then you can just add that to the tracker.

function handleDirection(src) {
  var delta = (src === 'left' && inverse) || (src !== 'left' && !inverse) ? -1 : 1;
  tracker += delta;
}

This could then be simplified further using the logic which @NinaScholz pointed out in her answer:

function handleDirection(src) {
  var delta = (src === 'left') === inverse ? -1 : 1;
  tracker += delta;
}
4

Assuming inverse is a flag you'd set once, then you don't need to take it into account every time, you can calculate its impact once and just use it as it is, which will cut down your code branches and logic. If you want to change it as you go along, then you might need to separate the logic for the calculation, in order to re-use it.

You can also then extract the movement direction into a self-contained function and your handleDirection becomes very simple - you calculate the direction you want to go based on src and the invert.

let tracker = 0;

//extract logic for the movement offset based on direction
function getDirectionOffset(src) {
  return src === 'left' ? 1 : -1;
}

//have a setter for the invert property
function setInverse(isInverse) {
  movementModifier = isInverse ? -1 : 1
}

//declare the variable dependent on the inverse property
let movementModifier;

//initialise movementModifier variable
setInverse(false);

function handleDirection(src) {
  const offset = getDirectionOffset(src) * movementModifier;
  
  tracker += offset;
}


// usage
setInverse(true);

handleDirection("left");
handleDirection("left");
handleDirection("right");

console.log(tracker);

With that said, all this suggests you shouldn't be using a function, or you should be using it differently. You can collect all that functionality in a class or instead have all the information passed around functions, so you don't have globals. Here is a sample object oriented implementation of the concept:

class TrackerMover {
  constructor(inverse) {
    this.tracker = 0;
    this.movementModifier = inverse ? 1 : -1
  }
  
  handleDirection(src) {
   const offset = this.getDirectionOffset(src) * this.movementModifier;

    this.tracker += offset;
  }
  
  getDirectionOffset(src) {
    return src === 'left' ? -1 : 1;
  }
  
  getPosition() {
    return this.tracker;
  }
}


//usage
const mover = new TrackerMover(true);

mover.handleDirection("left");
mover.handleDirection("left");
mover.handleDirection("right");

console.log(mover.getPosition())

By the way, another alternative is to NOT compute the movement every time. You actually know what is happening every time - in effect, you have a truth table where your inputs are src === left and inverse and the outputs are how you modify your tracking.

+--------+------------+--------+
| isLeft | isInverted | Offset |
+--------+------------+--------+
| true   | true       |     -1 |
| true   | false      |      1 |
| false  | true       |      1 |
| false  | false      |     -1 |
+--------+------------+--------+

So, you can just put that table in.

let tracker = 0;
let invert = false;

const movementLookupTable = {
  "true": { },
  "false": { },
}

//it can be initialised as part of the above expression but this is more readable
movementLookupTable[true ][true ] = -1;
movementLookupTable[true ][false] = 1;
movementLookupTable[false][true ] = 1;
movementLookupTable[false][false] = -1;

function handleDirection(src) {
  const offset = movementLookupTable[src === "left"][invert];

  tracker += offset;
}


// usage
invert = true;

handleDirection("left");
handleDirection("left");
handleDirection("right");

console.log(tracker);

In this case it might be an overkill but this approach might be useful if there are more flags (including more values for the flags) and/or end states. For example, maybe you want to introduce four directions, but you don't modify the tracker value if it's up or down.

+-----------+------------+--------+
| direction | isInverted | Offset |
+-----------+------------+--------+
| left      | true       |     -1 |
| left      | false      |      1 |
| right     | true       |      1 |
| right     | false      |     -1 |
| up        | false      |      0 |
| up        | true       |      0 |
| down      | false      |      0 |
| down      | true       |      0 |
+-----------+------------+--------+

As you can see, now it's not just booleans, you can handle any value. Using a table, you also then change invert to be something like windDirection, so if the movement is left and the windDirection is right, the result is like what it is now, but you could have direction of left and wind going left, so you move further. Or you can move up and the wind direction is left so tracker (at this point the X coordinates) is going to actually be modified.

+-----------+---------------+---------+
| direction | windDirection | OffsetX |
+-----------+---------------+---------+
| left      | right         |      -1 |
| left      | up            |       1 |
| left      | down          |       1 |
| left      | left          |       2 |
| right     | up            |      -1 |
| right     | down          |      -1 |
| right     | right         |      -2 |
| right     | left          |       1 |
| up        | up            |       0 |
| up        | down          |       0 |
| up        | left          |       1 |
| up        | right         |      -1 |
| down      | up            |       0 |
| down      | down          |       0 |
| down      | left          |       1 |
| down      | right         |      -1 |
+-----------+---------------+---------+

With four directions and four wind directions to take into account the logic can be quite annoying to both read and maintain in the future, while if you only have a lookup table, it's easy and you can easily extend this to even handle diagonals (let's assume they change the value by 0.5 instead of 1) and your algorithm would not really care as long as you just fetch the values from the table.

3

This has only one conditional, and I find it reads more intuitively than the other answers:

function handleDirection(src) {
    if (
        ((src === 'left') && !inverse) ||
        ((src === 'right') && inverse)
    ) {
        tracker++;
    }
    else {
        tracker--;
    }
}
3

You want to increase the tracker if one of src == left or inverse is true but not the other, and decrease it otherwise, which is what the "XOR" ^ operator does :

function handleDirection(src) {
    if (src === 'left' ^ inverse) {
        tracker++;
    } else {
        tracker--;
    }
}

You can reduce that further by using a ternary expression :

function handleDirection(src) {
    tracker += src === 'left' ^ inverse ? 1 : -1;
}

Or if you want to avoid any kind of conditionnal, with implicit casts and "clever" arithmetics :

function handleDirection(src) {
    tracker += 1 - 2 * (src === 'right' ^ inverse); // either 1-0=1 or 1-2=-1
}
  • 1
    You got the logic backwards, and I hate the third example, but +1 for actually using the operator built for this. – Jacob Raihle Dec 13 '18 at 17:08
  • 2
    @JacobRaihle thanks, I fixed the backward logic. The quotes around "clever" for the third example are sarcasm quotes, I wouldn't recommend using it unless the only point is to play the smartass. – Aaron Dec 13 '18 at 17:18
3

You don't need any if sentence at all. The same operation can be performed by calculating a positive or negative increment depending on src and inverse with just the help of ternary operator.

function handleDirection(src) {
    tracker += (src == "left" ? 1 : -1) * (inverse ? -1 : 1);
};

Btw. For the sake of efficiency, I would recommend directly use numeric increments / decrements instead of strings that requires extra processing to be decoded. You can use constants to achieve the same readability:

Also inverse can be optimised as a numeric value switching between 1 (not inverted) and -1 (inverted).

const left = 1;
const right = -1;
var direction = 1;

function handleDirection(src) {
    tracker += src * direction;
}

function reverse() { // (Example)
    direction = direction * -1;
}

...even if "right" and "left" keywords comes from some sort of textual user input, you can simply translate them from a dictionary:

const steps = {
    left = 1;
    right = -1;
};

function handleDirection(src) {
    tracker += steps[src] * direction;
}
2

You can use short circuiting syntax or ternary operators

// by using short circuiting
    function handleDirection(src) {
       if (src == 'left') tracker = inverse && tracker-1 || tracker +1
       else  tracker = inverse && tracker+1 || tracker -1
    }
// by using ternary operator
 function handleDirection(src) {
       if (src == 'left') tracker = inverse ? tracker-1 : tracker +1
       else  tracker = inverse ? tracker+1 : tracker -1
    }
2

I dislike elses and try to avoid nesting if possible. I think this conveys the idea of inverse in a more natural way:

function handleDirection(src) 
{
    let change = 1;

    if ('right' == src)
        change = -1;

    if (inverse)
        change = -change;

    tracker += change;
}
0

I know this is not directly addressing the question with a direct "simplification" but I would like to provide you with an answer that addresses several issues of code-quality while also making the code more readable.

About side effects

First of all this given function mutates external values. This introduces the problem of side effects:

  • The function is altering external state that may not be handled in the outside environment, thus can lead to undefined behavior.
  • The function itself is then bound to the external state, making it hard to change and refactor code.

It is also much harder to test such a function as you have to "create the state environment" first in order to run the test.

A first easy tweak would be to make the accept all external values by parameter and just return either a 1 or -1 value that is assigned to whatever (in your case tracker).

Exclusive-or conditionals with Strings

Second, using an if/else on String values with exclusive or can lead to an undefined state where src could be something else than 'right' but the function behaves as if it would be 'right'. Instead it should throw an exception. Using a switch is a good help here.

Applying these points to the function

If the points above are considered, the overall function would look like this:

function handleDirection (src, inverse) {
  switch (src) {
    case 'left':
      return inverse ? -1 :  1
    case 'right':
      return inverse ?  1 : -1
    default:
      throw new Error(`Unknown src: ${src}`)
  }
}

and you could easily test this function:

handleDirection('left' , true)  // -1
handleDirection('left' , false) //  1
handleDirection('right', true)  //  1
handleDirection('right', false) // -1
handleDirection('middle',true)  // Error: Unknown src: middle

Now the function is clearly decoupled from tracker (think of your valuable time when refactoring) but furthermore it is totally clear what the function does.

Note

Summarized I wanted to emphasize, that it is not always about writing the most simple code with the fewest lines but code that is clear to read / understand and to maintain. It is not as short as many of the provided solutions but everyone should immediately understand what it does.

-1

Right now you are comparing on strings, which I wouldn't advise. If for example you use 'Left' instead of 'left' it will fail the first if statement. Perhaps a boolean could be of use here, since you can guarantee it only has two states.

The if statements inside can be compressed via conditional operators.

Perhaps something like this is what you are looking for:

function handleDirection(src) {
  if (src) {
    inverse ? tracker-- : tracker++;
  } else {
    inverse ? tracker++ : tracker--;
  }
}

See: https://jsfiddle.net/9zr4f3nv/

  • 3
    Your two branches of the if statement are identical: one of them needs to be reversed – Charlie Harding Dec 13 '18 at 17:03
  • Oopsie! You're right hehe. Corrected! – MagicLegend Dec 14 '18 at 17:06
-3

You could use an 2 dimensional array type data structure from js and store the desired outcomes at index sec and inverse. Or JSON.

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