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I have tried fixing this on my own and I cant seem to find a solution. I am encrypting folders using java AES looping through all the files in the folder. Now, I also want to encrypt files that are inside a folder which is inside the selected folder, can anyone please help?

Here is my code for looping through the selected folder.

Arrays.asList(filelist).forEach(file -> {

    try {
        encrypting = fileProcessor(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, FolderKey.getText(), file, file);

        FolderProgress.progressProperty().unbind();
        FolderProgress.progressProperty().bind(encrypting.progressProperty());
        encrypting.messageProperty().addListener(new ChangeListener<String>() {
            @Override
            public void changed(ObservableValue<? extends String> observable, String oldValue, String newValue) {

                System.out.println(newValue);
            }
        });
        new Thread(encrypting).start();
    } catch (InvalidKeyException e) {
        //Dsiplay error message if the key is wrong.
        Alert alert = new Alert(Alert.AlertType.ERROR);
        alert.setContentText("Incorrect password!");
        alert.showAndWait();
        System.err.println("Couldn't encrypt " + file.getName() + ": " + e.getMessage());
    }
});

This is the encrypting method:

public Task fileProcessor(int cipherMode, String key, File inputFile, File outputFile) {
    return new Task() {
        @Override
        protected Object call() throws Exception {

            try {
                Key secretKey = new SecretKeySpec(key.getBytes(), "AES");
                Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
                cipher.init(cipherMode, secretKey);
                //getting ourr input file in bytes.
                FileInputStream inputStream = new FileInputStream(inputFile);
                byte[] inputBytes = new byte[(int) inputFile.length()];
                inputStream.read(inputBytes);

                byte[] outputBytes = cipher.doFinal(inputBytes);
                //Writing out to our output file
                FileOutputStream outputStream = new FileOutputStream(outputFile);
                outputStream.write(outputBytes);
                //clossing the input and output streams.
                inputStream.close();
                outputStream.close();
                //This for loop is for our progress indicator, it sleeps for half a second for each loop
                //Thus it takes it 5 secs to complete the loop and our task.
                for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
                    //sleep for 5 secs.
                    Thread.sleep(500);
                    updateMessage("500 milliseconds");
                    //update the progress.
                    updateProgress(i + 1, 10);
                }

            } catch (NoSuchPaddingException | NoSuchAlgorithmException
                    | InvalidKeyException | BadPaddingException
                    | IllegalBlockSizeException | IOException e) {

                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (java.security.InvalidKeyException ex) {
                //Dsiplaying error message if the kkey entered is wrong.
                Alert alert = new Alert(Alert.AlertType.ERROR);
                alert.setContentText("Incorrect password!");
                alert.showAndWait();
                Logger.getLogger(Controller.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            }
            return true;
        }
    };
}
  • 1
    Are you asking how to walk a file tree to some arbitrary depth? – Slaw Dec 13 '18 at 17:03
  • @Slaw yes, something like that! – Benson Kiprono Dec 13 '18 at 17:24
  • Many answers to the linked question deal with NIO (i.e. java.nio.file classes) but some use the older java.io classes (i.e. File). The NIO classes make it easier (I think) to stop at some arbitrary depth as methods like Files.walk, Files.find, and Files.walkFileTree can take a depth parameter. – Slaw Dec 13 '18 at 17:30

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