9

So I have a method that has 3 different types of arguments that could come in:

Int32, Int and Double. So the idea was to use generics to minimize the interface

func resetProgressBarChunks<T:Numeric>(originalIterationCount: T) {
    guard let iCount = originalIterationCount as? Double else {return}

But what I have realized, is at runtime, the Int32 and Int arguments will actually fail that guard let. It makes sense, it was just wishful thinking on my part.

But if I try to simply cast a Numeric into a double, the compiler will bark:

func resetProgressBarChunks<T:Numeric>(originalIterationCount: T) {
    guard let iCount = Double(originalIterationCount) else {return}

Cannot invoke initializer for type 'Double' with an argument of type '(T)'

Which I suppose also makes sense, because there is no initializer for Double that takes a Generic.

So it looks like I'm about to be forced to write 3 methods with different parameter types. The Int32 and Int parameter types would just cast into a Double and then call the Double method. Is this really the best way? I really was hoping I could leverage Numeric somehow

1
  • 3
    "Is this really the best way?" Basically yes. You solve the problem by overloading, not by a generic. Look at how + works in the Swift standard library! There is not one + for all numbers; there is a + for every separate numeric type.
    – matt
    Dec 14 '18 at 0:20
9

... because there is no initializer for Double that takes a Generic.

That is not entirely true. There is no initializer taking a Numeric argument. But there are generic initializers taking BinaryInteger and BinaryFloatingPoint arguments, so that two overloads are sufficient:

func resetProgressBarChunks<T: BinaryInteger>(originalIterationCount: T) {
    let iCount = Double(originalIterationCount)
    // ...
}

func resetProgressBarChunks<T: BinaryFloatingPoint>(originalIterationCount: T) {
    let iCount = Double(originalIterationCount)
    // ...
}

This covers Double, Int, Int32 arguments as well as Float and all other fixed-size integer types.

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  • 1
    This is clearly the better answer because the function can accept any number type without needing an switch case for each number type. Apr 8 '20 at 12:14
7

Just for purposes of syntactical illustration, here's an example of making this a generic and arriving at a Double for all three types:

func f<T:Numeric>(_ i: T) {
    var d = 0.0
    switch i {
    case let ii as Int:
        d = Double(ii)
    case let ii as Int32:
        d = Double(ii)
    case let ii as Double:
        d = ii
    default:
        fatalError("oops")
    }
    print(d)
}

But whether this is better than overloading is a matter of opinion. In my view, overloading is far better, because with the generic we are letting a bunch of unwanted types in the door. The Numeric contract is a lie. A triple set of overloads for Double, Int, and Int32 would turn the compiler into a source of truth.

1
  • This is a really bad idea because more types could be added that conform to Numeric (either from the standard library or from third parties). It would be better to add a concrete overload for every known type that conforms to Numeric. Then, you won't get a fatalError when trying to pass in a type that's not handled in the switch statement. This should not be the accepted answer. May 23 at 8:08

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