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I have a method like this.

 public Response post(String json) {

   EventList list = Recorder.getRecorders();
   if (null == list || list.isEmpty()) {
     throw new ServiceUnavailableException("An Recorder is either not configured");
  }
  String targetIUrl = list.getNext().getBase();
  String targetV2Url = targetUrl + "/v2";

 // other processes......
}
  1. I want to mock Recorder.getRecorder() and do something like when(Recorder.getRecorder()).thenReturn(null) and test if throw a 503 exception. But getRecorder() is a static method. I know Mockito cannot mock the static method, but I still wanna know if it is possible to change some code made this testable without using Powermock or other libraries.

  2. If I mock Recorder, do I have to change the method to post(String json, Recorder recorder)? Otherwise, how can I make this mock interact with the method?

  • Using something like Powermockito would help you if you had the option to use it. However, think about whether you can pass in the 'list' to this method (may or may not be the solution you are after). Or can you get rid of the static call? – Andy Dec 14 '18 at 4:59
1

If you want to mock the getRecorders() behaviour without using a library for mocking static methods (such as Powermock) then you'll have to extract the static call from inside post(). There are a few options for this:

  1. Pass the EventList into post()

    public post(String json, EventList list) {
        ...
    }
    
  2. Inject the EventList into the class which contains post()

    public class TheOneThatContainsThePostMethod {
        private EventList eventList;
    
        public TheOneThatContainsThePostMethod(EventList eventList) {
            this.eventList = eventList;
        }
    
        public post(String json) {
            if (null == this.eventList || this.eventList.isEmpty()) {
                throw new ServiceUnavailableException("An Recorder is either not configured");
            }
        }
    }
    
  3. Hide the static method call inside another class and inject an instance of that class into post() or the class which contains post(). For example:

    public class RecorderFactory {
        public EventList get() {
            return Recorder.getRecorders();
        }
    }
    
    public class TheOneThatContainsThePostMethod {
        private RecorderFactory recorderFactory;
    
        public TheOneThatContainsThePostMethod(RecorderFactory recorderFactory) {
            this.recorderFactory = recorderFactory;
        }
    
        public post(String json) {
            EventList list = recorderFactory.getRecorders();
            ...
        }
    }
    
    // Or ...
    
    public post(String json, RecorderFactory recorderFactory) {
        EventList list = recorderFactory.getRecorders();
        ...
    }
    

With the first two approaches your test can simply invoke post() providing (1) a null EventList; (2) an empty EventList ... thereby allowing you to test the 'throw a 503 exception' behaviour.

With the third approach you can use Mockito to mock the behaviour of the RecorderFactory to return (1) a null EventList; (2) an empty EventList ... thereby allowing you to test the 'throw a 503 exception' behaviour.

  • Thank you very much. I really appreciate it. – HenlenLee Dec 14 '18 at 14:00

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