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I am trying to take a slice of a Pandas 2-level multiindex dataframe at the second (innermost) level, apply a mask to the slice, and then in-place "drop' the masked, sliced rows from the original dataframe. I'm doing it all in one line of code, to try to avoid chained assignment issues and make sure I am applying the "drop" operation to the original dataframe.

The mask is generated by a complex mathematical operation and ends up being in the form of a boolean numpy array of the same length as the slice.

However, when I examine the original dataframe after the "drop" operation, it still contains the data which should have been dropped. I have browsed many pages to try to solve this, and attempted many permutations on the syntax, to no avail.

I get no warnings emitted about SettingWithCopyWarning.

The following code is a simplified model of my code which demonstrates the problem, and hopefully communicates what I want to do:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> import pandas as pd
>>> pd.__version__
u'0.23.4'
>>> index = pd.MultiIndex(levels=[[u'bar', u'baz', u'foo', u'qux'], 
                                  [u'one', u'two', u'three', u'four']], 
                          labels=[[0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3], 
                                  [0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3]], 
                          names=[u'first', u'second'])
>>> df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(8, 4), index=index)
>>> df.columns = ['c0', 'c1', 'c2', 'c3']
>>> df
                    c0        c1        c2        c3
first second
bar   one    -2.366973 -0.887149 -0.301309  1.312207
      one     1.266500  0.864888 -1.407567  0.265077
baz   two    -1.926091 -0.671274 -0.295846  0.679759
      two    -0.212970  0.136552  0.219074  0.541827
foo   three  -0.698288 -2.059952  0.248811  0.947879
      three  -2.017481  0.163013 -0.906551 -0.102474
qux   four   -1.083530  0.097077  0.224977  0.251739
      four    0.943804  1.356789 -0.953357  0.592986

Generate the mask from a slice:

>>> two_data = df[df.index.get_level_values('second') == 'two']
>>> mask = (two_data['c1'] > 0)
>>> mask = mask.values
array([False,  True])

Demonstrate that dropping the masked sliced values works when not inplace (inplace=False):

>>> df[df.index.get_level_values('second') == 'two'][mask].drop('two', level=1)
Empty DataFrame
Columns: [c0, c1, c2, c3]
Index: []
>>> df[df.index.get_level_values('second') == 'two'].iloc[mask].drop('two', level=1)
Empty DataFrame
Columns: [c0, c1, c2, c3]
Index: []

The original dataframe is still intact, as expected:

>>> df
                    c0        c1        c2        c3
first second
bar   one    -2.366973 -0.887149 -0.301309  1.312207
      one     1.266500  0.864888 -1.407567  0.265077
baz   two    -1.926091 -0.671274 -0.295846  0.679759
      two    -0.212970  0.136552  0.219074  0.541827
foo   three  -0.698288 -2.059952  0.248811  0.947879
      three  -2.017481  0.163013 -0.906551 -0.102474
qux   four   -1.083530  0.097077  0.224977  0.251739
      four    0.943804  1.356789 -0.953357  0.592986

Now attempt to drop the rows inplace. In both cases the expected row is NOT dropped:

>>> df[df.index.get_level_values('second') == 'two'][mask].drop('two', level=1, inplace=True)
>>> df
                    c0        c1        c2        c3
first second
bar   one    -2.366973 -0.887149 -0.301309  1.312207
      one     1.266500  0.864888 -1.407567  0.265077
baz   two    -1.926091 -0.671274 -0.295846  0.679759
      two    -0.212970  0.136552  0.219074  0.541827
foo   three  -0.698288 -2.059952  0.248811  0.947879
      three  -2.017481  0.163013 -0.906551 -0.102474
qux   four   -1.083530  0.097077  0.224977  0.251739
      four    0.943804  1.356789 -0.953357  0.592986

Try another form using iloc for the mask, to no avail:

>>> df[df.index.get_level_values('second') == 'two'].iloc[mask].drop('two', level=1, inplace=True)
>>> df
                    c0        c1        c2        c3
first second
bar   one    -2.366973 -0.887149 -0.301309  1.312207
      one     1.266500  0.864888 -1.407567  0.265077
baz   two    -1.926091 -0.671274 -0.295846  0.679759
      two    -0.212970  0.136552  0.219074  0.541827
foo   three  -0.698288 -2.059952  0.248811  0.947879
      three  -2.017481  0.163013 -0.906551 -0.102474
qux   four   -1.083530  0.097077  0.224977  0.251739
      four    0.943804  1.356789 -0.953357  0.592986

The expected result if the inplace drop us working would be:

                    c0        c1        c2        c3
first second
bar   one    -2.366973 -0.887149 -0.301309  1.312207
      one     1.266500  0.864888 -1.407567  0.265077
baz   two    -1.926091 -0.671274 -0.295846  0.679759
foo   three  -0.698288 -2.059952  0.248811  0.947879
      three  -2.017481  0.163013 -0.906551 -0.102474
qux   four   -1.083530  0.097077  0.224977  0.251739
      four    0.943804  1.356789 -0.953357  0.592986

Please advise on how this should be done. I expected this to work because I thought the sequential application of loc[].iloc[].drop() on one line would address the drop operation to the source data of the original dataframe.

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  • Even greatly simplifying further to df.loc[('baz','two'),:].drop('two', level=1, inplace=True) does not result in any data being dropped from df Dec 14 '18 at 4:11
  • I can't reproduce your results because you have not seeded your data. Please add np.random.seed(0) and re-write your posts if you want verifiable answers.
    – cs95
    Dec 14 '18 at 4:22
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I cannot reproduce your data and expected output, but I can suggest using eval and boolean indexing:

df = df[~df.eval('second == "two" and c1 > 0')]

Or, using query:

df = df.query('not (second == "two" and c1 > 0)')

If you do this a bit differently, by querying the index and dropping them:

df = df.drop(df.query('second == "two" and c1 > 0').index)

Or,

df.drop(df.query('second == "two" and c1 > 0').index, inplace=True)

But keep in mind that both these methods (similar to the methods above) will generate a copy of your DataFrame. There is no way to do this in-place (even inplace=True generates a copy and assigns it back to the original DataFrame object).

3
  • Thanks for the suggestion. But it assumes that the mask can be applied meaningfully to the entire table. However, in my case that is not really true - the mask is generated from a slice and is only known on that slice. I believe it is a constraint of this problem that the mask can only be applied to the sliced part of the original dataframe. In reality the dataframe is huge, and I want to just drop carefully selected rows. Dec 14 '18 at 4:39
  • 1
    @AndrewMedlin I've edited, but you need to understand the drop returns a copy of the entire dataframe, no matter how tiny the number of rows being dropped are. Even with inplace=True, you will still have a copy internally created and mapped back to the original object. Carefully think about your approach here. I have edited my answer with an alternative solution.
    – cs95
    Dec 14 '18 at 4:42
  • @AndrewMedlin Let me know if there are still issues, I'l do my best to fix them.
    – cs95
    Dec 15 '18 at 2:49

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