39

I just encountered this decompiled class file of my class:

MyClass

while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
    System.out.println("line: " + line);
    if (i == 0) {
        colArr = line.split(Pattern.quote("|"));

    } else {
        i++;
    }
}

The while loop has been changed to a for loop in the class file:

Decompiled MyClass

for (String[] colArr = null; (line = reader.readLine()) != null; ++i) {
    System.out.println("line: " + line);
    if (i == 0) {
        colArr = line.split(Pattern.quote("|"));
    } else {
    }
}

Why has this loop been changed to a for? I think it might be another way of code optimization by the compiler, I could be wrong. I just wanted to know if it is, what advantages does a for loop provide over a while loop or other loop?
What is the category of such code optimizations?

  • 23
    Hard to tell from source code along, but it might just be a choice of the decompiler to show you this version. Note that a decompiler has to "guess" a bit - it chooses one possible source code that might lead to the given bytecode. – Hulk Dec 14 '18 at 11:02
  • 6
    @KumarAnkit - No necessarily optimization, no. There isn't a one-to-one relationship between source constructs and bytecode. That's what Hulk means when he/she says "a decompiler has to 'guess' a bit." – T.J. Crowder Dec 14 '18 at 11:04
  • 8
    @KumarAnkit what people are trying to explain is that maybe there's no optimization at all. Try translating a hindi (or whatever is your regional dialect) sentence in english using Google translate, and then back to hindi. You'll be lucky if it's the same sentence than at the beginning. Here it's the same thing, got it? – Dici Dec 14 '18 at 11:07
  • 13
    @KumarAnkit - for (and while, etc.) don't exist at the bytecode level. It's jump instructions, assignments, etc. One decompiler might look at some bytecode and say "that looks like a for" while another might look at it and say "that looks like a while". "So, does it mean these loops are identical at the byte-code level?" Not necessarily. If you compile the code output by a decompiler, you don't necessarily end up with identical bytecode. In fact, I suspect you rarely would. – T.J. Crowder Dec 14 '18 at 11:12
  • 8
    OP must be hiding something from us. The two snippets are not equivalent. The first one will never update i once it's equal to zero, so it may set the value of colArr multiple times in a reasonable scenario. The second one will update colArr only once. – ach Dec 14 '18 at 13:42
44

In this situation changing while() to for() is not an optimization. There is simply no way to know from bytecode which one was used in a source code.

There are many situations when:

while(x)

is the same as:

for(;x;)

Suppose we have a three similar java applications - one with while() statement, and two with corresponting for(). First for() with stopping criterion only like in the standard while(), and second for() also with iterator declaration and incrementation.

APPLICATION #1 - SOURCE

public class While{
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        int i = 0;
        while(i<5){
            System.out.println(i);
            i++;
        }
    }
}

APPLICATION #2 - SOURCE

public class For{
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        int i = 0;
        for(; i<5 ;){
            System.out.println(i);
            i++;
        }
    }
}

APPLICATION #3 - SOURCE

public class For2{
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        for(int i=0;i<5;i++){
            System.out.println(i);
        }
    }
}

If we compile all of them we have got:

APPLICATION #1 - BYTECODE

public class While {
  public While();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: invokespecial #1                  // Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
       4: return

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: iconst_0
       1: istore_1
       2: iload_1
       3: iconst_5
       4: if_icmpge     20
       7: getstatic     #2                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      10: iload_1
      11: invokevirtual #3                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(I)V
      14: iinc          1, 1
      17: goto          2
      20: return
}

APPLICATION #2 - BYTECODE

public class For {
  public For();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: invokespecial #1                  // Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
       4: return

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: iconst_0
       1: istore_1
       2: iload_1
       3: iconst_5
       4: if_icmpge     20
       7: getstatic     #2                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      10: iload_1
      11: invokevirtual #3                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(I)V
      14: iinc          1, 1
      17: goto          2
      20: return
}

APPLICATION #3 - BYTECODE

public class For2 extends java.lang.Object{
public For2();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   iconst_0
   1:   istore_1
   2:   iload_1
   3:   iconst_5
   4:   if_icmpge       20
   7:   getstatic       #2; //Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
   10:  iload_1
   11:  invokevirtual   #3; //Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(I)V
   14:  iinc    1, 1
   17:  goto    2
   20:  return

}

So you can see, there is no difference associated with for and while usage.

  • 3
    Maybe you could put the actual bytecode of both snippets in your answer to prove your point :p it's the intuitive answer, but it doesn't mean it's right – Dici Dec 14 '18 at 11:12
  • The bytecode will simply have a GOTO. – Jörg W Mittag Dec 14 '18 at 13:44
  • 1
    @Dici I've put a sample for better explanation. – dgebert Dec 14 '18 at 15:10
  • @dgebert +1. :p – Dici Dec 14 '18 at 19:31
  • 4
    I like this answer: I think the demonstration can be improved by moving the i++ into the for-loop to make: for(; i<5 ; i++){. That way you can show that either way, the bytecode puts the iinc at the end of the loop body at the bytecode level, and so the decompiler can't always tell if the i++ goes into the last field of the for loop or as the last statement in the loop body. – mtraceur Dec 14 '18 at 21:06
14

As others have already pointed out: The decompiler (usually) cannot distinguish between different source codes that result in the same byte code.

Unfortunately, you did not provide the full code of the method. So the following contains some guesses about where and how this loop appears inside a method (and these guesses might, to some extent, distort the result).

But let's have a look at some roundtrips here. Consider the following class, containing methods with both versions of the code that you posted:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class DecompileExample {

    public static void methodA(BufferedReader reader) throws IOException {
        String line = null;
        int i = 0;
        while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
            System.out.println("line: " + line);
            if (i == 0) {
                String[] colArr = line.split(Pattern.quote("|"));

            } else {
                i++;
            }
        }
    }

    public static void methodB(BufferedReader reader) throws IOException {
        String line = null;
        int i = 0;
        for (String[] colArr = null; (line = reader.readLine()) != null; ++i) {
            System.out.println("line: " + line);
            if (i == 0) {
                colArr = line.split(Pattern.quote("|"));
            } else {
            }
        }
    }
}

Compiling it with

javac DecompileExample.java -g:none

will create the corresponding class file. (Note: The -g:none parameter will cause the compiler to omit all debug information. The debug information might otherwise be used by the decompiler to reconstruct a more verbatim version of the original code, particularly, including the original variable names)

Now looking at the byte code of both methods, with

javap -c DecompileExample.class

will yield the following:

  public static void methodA(java.io.BufferedReader) throws java.io.IOException;
    Code:
       0: aconst_null
       1: astore_1
       2: iconst_0
       3: istore_2
       4: aload_0
       5: invokevirtual #2                  // Method java/io/BufferedReader.readLine:()Ljava/lang/String;
       8: dup
       9: astore_1
      10: ifnull        61
      13: getstatic     #3                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      16: new           #4                  // class java/lang/StringBuilder
      19: dup
      20: invokespecial #5                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder."<init>":()V
      23: ldc           #6                  // String line:
      25: invokevirtual #7                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
      28: aload_1
      29: invokevirtual #7                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
      32: invokevirtual #8                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.toString:()Ljava/lang/String;
      35: invokevirtual #9                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
      38: iload_2
      39: ifne          55
      42: aload_1
      43: ldc           #10                 // String |
      45: invokestatic  #11                 // Method java/util/regex/Pattern.quote:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/String;
      48: invokevirtual #12                 // Method java/lang/String.split:(Ljava/lang/String;)[Ljava/lang/String;
      51: astore_3
      52: goto          4
      55: iinc          2, 1
      58: goto          4
      61: return

and

  public static void methodB(java.io.BufferedReader) throws java.io.IOException;
    Code:
       0: aconst_null
       1: astore_1
       2: iconst_0
       3: istore_2
       4: aconst_null
       5: astore_3
       6: aload_0
       7: invokevirtual #2                  // Method java/io/BufferedReader.readLine:()Ljava/lang/String;
      10: dup
      11: astore_1
      12: ifnull        60
      15: getstatic     #3                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      18: new           #4                  // class java/lang/StringBuilder
      21: dup
      22: invokespecial #5                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder."<init>":()V
      25: ldc           #6                  // String line:
      27: invokevirtual #7                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
      30: aload_1
      31: invokevirtual #7                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
      34: invokevirtual #8                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.toString:()Ljava/lang/String;
      37: invokevirtual #9                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
      40: iload_2
      41: ifne          54
      44: aload_1
      45: ldc           #10                 // String |
      47: invokestatic  #11                 // Method java/util/regex/Pattern.quote:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/String;
      50: invokevirtual #12                 // Method java/lang/String.split:(Ljava/lang/String;)[Ljava/lang/String;
      53: astore_3
      54: iinc          2, 1
      57: goto          6
      60: return
}

(There is a small difference: The String[] colArr = null is translated into an

aconst null
astore_3

at the beginning of the second version. But this is one of the aspects that is related to parts of the code that you have omitted in the question).

You did not mention which one you are using, but the JD-GUI decompiler from http://jd.benow.ca/ decompiles this into the following:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.PrintStream;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class DecompileExample
{
  public static void methodA(BufferedReader paramBufferedReader)
    throws IOException
  {
    String str = null;
    int i = 0;
    while ((str = paramBufferedReader.readLine()) != null)
    {
      System.out.println("line: " + str);
      if (i == 0) {
        String[] arrayOfString = str.split(Pattern.quote("|"));
      } else {
        i++;
      }
    }
  }

  public static void methodB(BufferedReader paramBufferedReader)
    throws IOException
  {
    String str = null;
    int i = 0;
    String[] arrayOfString = null;
    while ((str = paramBufferedReader.readLine()) != null)
    {
      System.out.println("line: " + str);
      if (i == 0) {
        arrayOfString = str.split(Pattern.quote("|"));
      }
      i++;
    }
  }
}

You can see that the code is the same for both cases (at least regarding the loop - there one more is a difference regarding the "dummy variables" that I had to introduce in order to compile it, but this is unrelated to the question, so to speak).

The tl;dr message is clear:

Different source codes can be compiled into the same byte code. Consequently, the same byte code can be decompiled into different source codes. But every decompiler has to settle for one version of the source code.

(A side note: I was a bit surprised to see that when compiling without -g:none (that is, when the debug information is retained), JD-GUI even somehow manages to reconstruct that the first one used a while-loop and the second one used a for-loop. But in general, and when the debug information is omitted, this is simply no longer possible).

  • I am using the IntelliJ IDEA, which uses the fernflower decompiler. Thanks for the elaborated answer. – KumarAnkit Dec 14 '18 at 12:45
  • @KumarAnkit As indicated by the comments about the -g:none flag, the result does not only depend on the decompiler, but also on how the .class files are generated in the first place. (But I assume that IDEs will usually not omit the debug information - in the end, they are basically intended for retaining it in order to use it in some nice debugger UI) – Marco13 Dec 14 '18 at 12:53
  • +1 I think you can make it more clear by more explicitly emphasizing how the i++ at the end of the source code's loop body and the ++i at the end of the for-loop declaration map to the same instructions at the end of the bytecode's loop body. – mtraceur Dec 14 '18 at 21:08
  • @mtraceur Yes, more generally: I considered to make the initial code more "sensible", that is, actually do something sensible with i and the colArr. But at some point, this involved so many changes that I was afraid to bury the code that was posted originally under these changes. Not sure about the best solution for this. But if the question was updated with compileable code, I'd update the answer accordingly. – Marco13 Dec 14 '18 at 22:05
6

That's basically because of the nature of bytecode. Java bytecode is something like assembly language, so there are no such things as for and while loop, there is simply jump instruction: goto. So there may be no difference between while and for loop, Both can be compiled to similar code and decompiler is just making guess.

  • 3
    While true, I think a good answer should make an analysis of the actual byte code. I don't have the motivation to do it now so I'll stick to comments, but just sayin' – Dici Dec 14 '18 at 11:11
5

Both the for loop and the while loop code segments can be translated into similar machine code. After that when de-compiling the de-compiler has to pick one of the two possible scenarios.

I guess that is what's happening here.

simply:

compile(A) -> C

compile(B) -> C

So when you are given C, then there should be a guess to pick A or B

  • 4
    Maybe you could put the actual bytecode of both snippets in your answer to prove your point :p it's the intuitive answer, but it doesn't mean it's right – Dici Dec 14 '18 at 11:12

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