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I've built a notification system with node-postgres and socket.io. The system works alright, however, I am getting an error on startup.

remaining connection slots are reserved for non-replication superuser connections

I suspect this is due to not releasing the client back to the pool.

Pool.connect()
    .then(client => {
        return client.query('LISTEN "new_notification"')
            .then(result => {
                client.on('notification', data => {
                    // Handle the notification
                });
                // Should release here
            })
            .catch(e => {
                // Should release here
                this.log(e.message, 'error');
            });
        })
    .catch(e => {
        this.log(e.message, 'error')
    });

However even after adding client.release() in the locations where // Should release here are marked I still receive the error message. The notification still works, though.

When the server starts it creates a single HeyListen object in which the Pool above is created as well.

Now, the above error usually happens when the server starts and is flooded with connections. There are 6 sites that handle connections with users. Each user spawns a new connection to the socket.io server and when the disconnecting event is triggered via socket.io they are removed from a list of connected users. Each time a user connects they trigger a query against postgres if they have outstanding notifications. Here's the query object:

const conn = this.getConnectionType(pool);
conn.connect()
    .then(client => {
        return client.query(query_string, params)
            .then(result => {
                client.release();
                callback(null, result);
            })
            .catch(error => {
                client.release();
                callback(error, null);
            });
    })
    .catch(error => {
        callback(error, null);
    });

If I run Select * From pg_stat_activity on my psql server I see:

enter image description here

I thought using client.release() was supposed to remove these connections? Rerunning the query above shows different query results so some are being removed. Is this an issue of not having enough max_connections available? If so is it a good idea to bump that number up for my use case?

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While experimenting with my own pub/sub client functionality for Node.js and PostgreSQL, I've seen that error when I run out of usable connections. If I remember correctly, the problem you're running into is that with the node-postgres package, a connection being used with LISTEN is considered active and in-use by the underlying connection pool until the client stops listening with UNLISTEN.

However, if you stop listening on a given connection, you'll no longer receive those useful notification events. Bit of a dilemma.

If possible, I'd advise you to look into setting up a smaller number of dedicated connections specifically for listening to various channels through PostgreSQL in each of your six applications, and then use separate connections to execute your additional queries. I don't know how feasible or performant this would be with your current traffic load, but in theory it should reduce the likelihood of using all available connections from the pool.

Out of curiosity, what was your rationale for having each user's connection LISTEN for notifications all on its own? It's possible to pass a payload to listeners through NOTIFY, so if you have some means of identifying an individual user, you could send your six apps a payload that declares which user a notification is for, and each of your six apps could forward that information to the correct user connection.

  • Sorry if it was unclear. There's a single Listen that is called when the server starts that stays open for the duration the server is running. When a user connects I use the event to let the server know they are there and any time the single Listen receives a new record it checks the connected user list, and if they are a part of that notification, it sends it to them. – Wild Beard Dec 15 '18 at 4:43
  • Oh! Somehow I missed that. I apologize. That definitely doesn't account for why so many connections are remaining in use. I don't suppose you've tried querying directly from the pool and letting the pool manage obtaining/releasing client connections just in case it handles whatever edge case you seem to be experiencing here, have you? – Connor Dec 18 '18 at 16:37
  • I haven't tried that. I wanted to split the actions when a new new_notification event is triggered out of the pool so it wasn't all in one spot. You know, easier to read, lo. – Wild Beard Dec 20 '18 at 23:53

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