6

I have been searching the web for methods that could create rolling windows so that I can perform a cross-validation technique known as Walk Forward Analysis for time series in a generalized manner.

However, I have not get around to any solution that incorporates flexibility in terms of 1) the window size (almost all methods have this; for example, pandas rolling or a bit different np.roll) and 2) window rolling quantity, understood as how many indexes do we want to roll the window (i.e. haven't found any that incorporates this).

I have been trying to optimize and make concise code, with the help of @coldspeed in this answer (I'm unable to comment there because I don't reach the needed reputation; hope to get there soon!), but I haven't been able to incorporate the window rolling quantity.

My thinkings:

  1. I have tried with np.roll together with my below example, with no success.

  2. I have also tried to modify the code below multiplying the ith value, but I don't get to fit it within the list comprehension, which I would like to maintain.

3. The example below does great for any window size, BUT, it only "rolls" the window one step ahead and I would like that it could be generalized to any step.

So, ¿is there any way to have this two parameters available within the list comprehension approach? or, ¿is there any other resource which I did not find that makes this easier? All the help is very much appreciated. My example code is the following:

In [1]: import numpy as np
In [2]: arr = np.random.random((10,3))

In [3]: arr

Out[3]: array([[0.38020065, 0.22656515, 0.25926935],
   [0.13446667, 0.04386083, 0.47210474],
   [0.4374763 , 0.20024762, 0.50494097],
   [0.49770835, 0.16381492, 0.6410294 ],
   [0.9711233 , 0.2004874 , 0.71186102],
   [0.61729025, 0.72601898, 0.18970222],
   [0.99308981, 0.80017134, 0.64955358],
   [0.46632326, 0.37341677, 0.49950571],
   [0.45753235, 0.55642914, 0.31972887],
   [0.4371343 , 0.08905587, 0.74511753]])

In [4]: inSamplePercentage = 0.4
In [5]: outSamplePercentage = 0.3 * inSamplePercentage

In [6]: windowSizeTrain = round(inSamplePercentage * arr.shape[0])
In [7]: windowSizeTest = round(outSamplePercentage * arr.shape[0])
In [8]: windowTrPlusTs = windowSizeTrain + windowSizeTest

In [9]: sliceListX = [arr[i: i + windowTrPlusTs] for i in range(len(arr) - (windowTrPlusTs-1))]

Given a window length of 5 and a window roll qty of 2, I could spec something like this:

Out [15]: 

[array([[0.38020065, 0.22656515, 0.25926935],
    [0.13446667, 0.04386083, 0.47210474],
    [0.4374763 , 0.20024762, 0.50494097],
    [0.49770835, 0.16381492, 0.6410294 ],
    [0.9711233 , 0.2004874 , 0.71186102]]),
 array([[0.4374763 , 0.20024762, 0.50494097],
    [0.49770835, 0.16381492, 0.6410294 ],
    [0.9711233 , 0.2004874 , 0.71186102],
    [0.61729025, 0.72601898, 0.18970222],
    [0.99308981, 0.80017134, 0.64955358]]),
 array([[0.9711233 , 0.2004874 , 0.71186102],
    [0.61729025, 0.72601898, 0.18970222],
    [0.99308981, 0.80017134, 0.64955358],
    [0.46632326, 0.37341677, 0.49950571],
    [0.45753235, 0.55642914, 0.31972887]]),
 array([[0.99308981, 0.80017134, 0.64955358],
   [0.46632326, 0.37341677, 0.49950571],
   [0.45753235, 0.55642914, 0.31972887],
   [0.4371343 , 0.08905587, 0.74511753]])]

(This incorporates the last array, although its lenght is less than 5).

OR:

Out [16]: 

[array([[0.38020065, 0.22656515, 0.25926935],
    [0.13446667, 0.04386083, 0.47210474],
    [0.4374763 , 0.20024762, 0.50494097],
    [0.49770835, 0.16381492, 0.6410294 ],
    [0.9711233 , 0.2004874 , 0.71186102]]),
 array([[0.4374763 , 0.20024762, 0.50494097],
    [0.49770835, 0.16381492, 0.6410294 ],
    [0.9711233 , 0.2004874 , 0.71186102],
    [0.61729025, 0.72601898, 0.18970222],
    [0.99308981, 0.80017134, 0.64955358]]),
 array([[0.9711233 , 0.2004874 , 0.71186102],
    [0.61729025, 0.72601898, 0.18970222],
    [0.99308981, 0.80017134, 0.64955358],
    [0.46632326, 0.37341677, 0.49950571],
    [0.45753235, 0.55642914, 0.31972887]])]

(Only the arrays with lenght == 5 -> However, this could be derived from the one above with a simple mask).

EDIT: Forgot to mention this also -- Something could be done if pandas rolling objects support iter metho.

3

IIUC what you want, you can use np.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided to create the view of the windows size and the rolling quantity such as:

#redefine arr to see better what is happening than with random numbers
arr = np.arange(30).reshape((10,3))
#get arr properties
arr_0, arr_1 = arr.shape
arr_is = arr.itemsize #the size of element in arr
#parameter window and rolling
win_size = 5
roll_qty = 2
# use as_stribed by defining the right parameters:
from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import as_strided
print (as_strided( arr, 
                   shape=(int((arr_0 - win_size)/roll_qty+1), win_size,arr_1),
                   strides=(roll_qty*arr_1*arr_is, arr_1*arr_is, arr_is)))

array([[[ 0,  1,  2],
        [ 3,  4,  5],
        [ 6,  7,  8],
        [ 9, 10, 11],
        [12, 13, 14]],

       [[ 6,  7,  8],
        [ 9, 10, 11],
        [12, 13, 14],
        [15, 16, 17],
        [18, 19, 20]],

       [[12, 13, 14],
        [15, 16, 17],
        [18, 19, 20],
        [21, 22, 23],
        [24, 25, 26]]])

and for another window size and rolling quantity:

win_size = 4
roll_qty = 3
print( as_strided( arr, 
                   shape=(int((arr_0 - win_size)/roll_qty+1), win_size,arr_1),
                   strides=(roll_qty*arr_1*arr_is, arr_1*arr_is, arr_is)))

array([[[ 0,  1,  2],
        [ 3,  4,  5],
        [ 6,  7,  8],
        [ 9, 10, 11]],

       [[ 9, 10, 11],
        [12, 13, 14],
        [15, 16, 17],
        [18, 19, 20]],

       [[18, 19, 20],
        [21, 22, 23],
        [24, 25, 26],
        [27, 28, 29]]])
  • 1
    @Ezarate11 here it is what I understand of it. When an array is created, it is stored in continuous memory, each element of your array has a size (here it's 8 bytes) and the strides is the number of bytes to shift in the memory to get the next item in each direction. Here for a same row, to get the next item in the line you need to shift of 8 bytes and on the next row, it is 8 bytes by the number of element per row (here it would be 3*8=24) If you do arr.strides you get (24,8) for the reason above. Note the word shift may be not the exact term but it is the best I can think of. – Ben.T Dec 16 '18 at 1:19
  • 1
    @Ezarate11 see the documentation about strides. Now for the problem, first be aware that they are just views and not copys. For example if at some point in your code, you attribute a value to an element of the as_stribed, let's say as_stribed( ...)[0,0,0] = 55, then your original array has been modified too. The other thing is that if you don't use the original strides (here actually we use them as they correpond to arr_1*arr_is and arr_is respectively) then your output will have none sense. – Ben.T Dec 16 '18 at 1:27
  • 1
    @Ezarate11 try to change in the as_strides the last strides by arr_is/3 for example, then you will have values that are not in the original array because the shift in the memory is not appropriate. It would be the same thing if you do more than int((arr_0 - win_size)/roll_qty+1) elements in the first dimension (add 2 for example). At some point I guess you can reach memory that are not supposed to be reach by your code and if you modify it, then it screws a lot of things for another part of your memory. But here it is just what I guess :) – Ben.T Dec 16 '18 at 1:33
  • 1
    @Ezarate11 to conclude, here in the strides, the first element is roll_qty*arr_1*arr_is because you want to jump of enough elements of your orignal array in the memory to get the first element of the row being at roll_qty rows if it makes sense! the others two values are arr.stribes to keep the same values in the rows and column after. – Ben.T Dec 16 '18 at 1:45
  • 1
    @Ezarate11 good :), btw, if you want to create the sliceListX, then you can do it by defining a step in the range such as: [arr[i: i + win_size] for i in range(0, arr_0 - win_size+1, roll_qty)] – Ben.T Dec 16 '18 at 16:32
3

So, giving my two cents (with all the help of @Ben.T), here goes the code to create a Walk Forward Analysis basic tool to get a view on how will your model/models perform in a more generalized manner.

Non-anchored WFA

def walkForwardAnal(myArr, windowSize, rollQty):

    from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import as_strided

    ArrRows, ArrCols = myArr.shape

    ArrItems = myArr.itemsize

    sliceQtyAndShape = (int((ArrRows - windowSize) / rollQty + 1), windowSize, ArrCols)
    print('The final view shape is {}'.format(sliceQtyAndShape))

    ArrStrides = (rollQty * ArrCols * ArrItems, ArrCols * ArrItems, ArrItems)
    print('The final strides are {}'.format(ArrStrides))

    sliceList = list(as_strided(myArr, shape=sliceQtyAndShape, strides=ArrStrides, writeable=False))

    return sliceList

wSizeTr = 400
wSizeTe = 100
wSizeTot = wSizeTr + wSizeTe
rQty = 200

sliceListX = wf.walkForwardAnal(X, wSizeTot, rQty)
sliceListY = wf.walkForwardAnal(y, wSizeTot, rQty)

for sliceArrX, sliceArrY in zip(sliceListX, sliceListY):

    ## Consider having to make a .copy() of each array, so that we don't modify the original one. 

    # XArr = sliceArrX.copy() and hence, changing Xtrain, Xtest = XArr[...]
    # YArr = sliceArrY.copy() and hence, changing Ytrain, Ytest = XArr[...]

    Xtrain = sliceArrX[:-wSizeTe,:]
    Xtest = sliceArrX[-wSizeTe:,:]

    Ytrain = sliceArrY[:-wSizeTe,:]
    Ytest = sliceArrY[-wSizeTe:,:]

Anchored WFA

timeSeriesCrossVal = TimeSeriesSplit(n_splits=5)

    for trainIndex, testIndex in timeSeriesCrossVal.split(X):
        ## Check if the training and testing quantities make sense. If not, increase or decrease the n_splits parameter. 

        Xtrain = X[trainIndex]
        Xtest = X[testIndex]

        Ytrain = y[trainIndex]
        Ytest = y[testIndex]

Then, you could just create the following (in any of the two approaches) and keep modelling:

        # Fit on training set only - The targets (y) are already encoded in dummy variables, so no need to standarize them.
    scaler = StandardScaler()
    scaler.fit(Xtrain)

    # Apply transform to both the training set and the test set.
    trainX = scaler.transform(Xtrain)
    testX = scaler.transform(Xtest)

    ## PCA - Principal Component Analysis #### APPLY PCA TO THE STANDARIZED TRAINING SET! :::: Fit on training set only.
    pca = PCA(.95)
    pca.fit(trainX)

    # Apply transform to both the training set and the test set.
    trainX = pca.transform(trainX)
    testX = pca.transform(testX)

    ## Predict and append predictions...

The one liner for a non-anchored case with generalized window rolling quantity:

sliceListX = [arr[i: i + wSizeTot] for i in range(0, arr.shape[0] - wSizeTot+1, rQty)]

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