6

Let's say, I have a bunch of functions a, b, c, d and e and I want to find out if they call any method from the random module:

def a():
    pass

def b():
    import random

def c():
    import random
    random.randint(0, 1)

def d():
    import random as ra
    ra.randint(0, 1)

def e():
    from random import randint as ra
    ra(0, 1)

I want to write a function uses_module so I can expect these assertions to pass:

assert uses_module(a) == False
assert uses_module(b) == False
assert uses_module(c) == True
assert uses_module(d) == True
assert uses_module(e) == True

(uses_module(b) is False because random is only imported but never one of its methods called.)

I can't modify a, b, c, d and e. So I thought it might be possible to use ast for this and walk along the function's code which I get from inspect.getsource. But I'm open to any other proposals, this was only an idea how it could work.

This is as far as I've come with ast:

def uses_module(function):
    import ast
    import inspect
    nodes = ast.walk(ast.parse(inspect.getsource(function)))
    for node in nodes:
        print(node.__dict__)
  • I imagine there would be a path forward using mock and assert_called to mock functions found in the ast of a type. will think about it – Wes Doyle Dec 16 '18 at 1:08
1

You can replace the random module with a mock object, providing custom attribute access and hence intercepting function calls. Whenever one of the functions tries to import (from) random it will actually access the mock object. The mock object can also be designed as a context manager, handing back the original random module after the test.

import sys


class Mock:
    import random
    random = random

    def __enter__(self):
        sys.modules['random'] = self
        self.method_called = False
        return self

    def __exit__(self, *args):
        sys.modules['random'] = self.random

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        def mock(*args, **kwargs):
            self.method_called = True
            return getattr(self.random, name)
        return mock


def uses_module(func):
    with Mock() as m:
        func()
        return m.method_called

Variable module name

A more flexible way, specifying the module's name, is achieved by:

import importlib
import sys


class Mock:
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
        self.module = importlib.import_module(name)

    def __enter__(self):
        sys.modules[self.name] = self
        self.method_called = False
        return self

    def __exit__(self, *args):
        sys.modules[self.name] = self.module

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        def mock(*args, **kwargs):
            self.method_called = True
            return getattr(self.module, name)
        return mock


def uses_module(func):
    with Mock('random') as m:
        func()
        return m.method_called
2

This is a work in progress, but perhaps it will spark a better idea. I am using the types of nodes in the AST to attempt to assert that a module is imported and some function it provides is used.

I have added what may be the necessary pieces to determine that this is the case to a checker defaultdict which can be evaluated for some set of conditions, but I am not using all key value pairs to establish an assertion for your use cases.

def uses_module(function):
    """
    (WIP) assert that a function uses a module
    """
    import ast
    import inspect
    nodes = ast.walk(ast.parse(inspect.getsource(function)))
    checker = defaultdict(set)
    for node in nodes:
        if type(node) in [ast.alias, ast.Import, ast.Name, ast.Attribute]:
            nd = node.__dict__
            if type(node) == ast.alias:
                checker['alias'].add(nd.get('name'))
            if nd.get('name') and nd.get('asname'):
                checker['name'].add(nd.get('name'))
                checker['asname'].add(nd.get('asname'))
            if nd.get('ctx') and nd.get('attr'):
                checker['attr'].add(nd.get('attr'))
            if nd.get('id'):
                checker['id'].add(hex(id(nd.get('ctx'))))
            if nd.get('value') and nd.get('ctx'):
                checker['value'].add(hex(id(nd.get('ctx'))))

    # print(dict(checker)) for debug

    # This check passes your use cases, but probably needs to be expanded
    if checker.get('alias') and checker.get('id'):
        return True
    return False
1

You can simply place a mock random.py in your local (test) directory containing the following code:

# >= Python 3.7.
def __getattr__(name):
    def mock(*args, **kwargs):
        raise RuntimeError(f'{name}: {args}, {kwargs}')  # For example.
    return mock


# <= Python 3.6.
class Wrapper:
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        def mock(*args, **kwargs):
            raise RuntimeError('{}: {}, {}'.format(name, args, kwargs))  # For example.
        return mock

import sys
sys.modules[__name__] = Wrapper()

Then you simply test your functions as follows:

def uses_module(func):
    try:
        func()
    except RuntimeError as err:
        print(err)
        return True
    return False

This works because instead of importing the builtin random module it will go for the mock module which emulates custom attribute access and hence can intercept the function calls.

If you don't want to interrupt the functions by raising an exception you can still use the same approach, by importing the original random module in the mock module (modifying sys.path appropriately) and then falling back on the original functions.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.