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I have the following piece of code that is not working

const int N=45;
long int toc;
toc = pow(2, N) - 1;
vector<long double > E(toc);

I think the problem is in

vector<long double > E(toc);

But I can't figure out what is wrong.

The error message is Debug Error! Program:..\Curie-Weise.exe

abort() has been called

The code is

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#define _USE_MATH_DEFINES
#include <cmath>  
#include <conio.h>
#include <ctime>
#include <limits>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <complex>
#include <vector>
#include <random>
#include <bitset>
using namespace std;
//Function sum J_ij s_i s_j
double CountSumflip(const vector<vector<double>>& J, const vector<int>& 
spin)
{
double sumflip = 0;
int N = spin.size();
for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
    for (int j = i + 1; j < N; j++)
    {
        sumflip += J[i][j] * spin[i] * spin[j];
    }
}
return 2 * sumflip; //izza treugolnika
}

//Function M= sum s_i
int CountMflip(const vector<int>& spin) {

int Mflip = 0;
int N = spin.size();
for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
    Mflip += spin[i];
}
return Mflip;
}
//Function M= sum b_i s_i
int CountBM(const vector<int>& spin, const vector<int>& Be) {
int BM = 0;
int N = spin.size();
for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
    BM += Be[i] * spin[i];
}
return BM;
}

//------------------MAIN---------------------------------------------
//--------------------------------------------------------------------
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
int job_number = atoi(argv[1]);

const int N = 40;

std::default_random_engine generator;//Normal generator with 
int seed = 1000000 + 100 * M_PI *  job_number + job_number * job_number;
generator.seed(seed);
std::normal_distribution<double> distribution(0.0 /* mean */, 1.0 
/*stddev*/);

std::fstream sfs("perebor_" + std::to_string(job_number) + ".txt", 
std::ios_base::out);
std::fstream sfs2("minimacount_" + std::to_string(job_number) + ".txt", 
std::ios_base::out);
vector<vector<double>> J(N, vector<double>(N));

for (unsigned short int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
{
    J[i][i] = 0;
    for (unsigned short int j = i + 1; j < N; ++j)
    {
        J[i][j] = J[j][i] = distribution(generator);

    }
}

long int minimacount = 0;
for (unsigned short int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
{
    for (unsigned short int j = 0; j < N; ++j)
        std::cout << J[i][j] << " ";
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

//----------------Magnetic field generator ------------------------
vector<int> Be(N);
for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
{
    Be[i] = 0;// rand() % 2 * 2 - 1;
}




long int num = 0; 
long int toc;
toc = pow(2, N) - 1;
cout <<"2^"<<N<<"= "<< toc << endl;


vector<long double > E(toc);
cout << "ups" << endl;
vector<double> Eflip(N);


for (num = 0; num <toc; num++)
{
    //if (num % 10000 == 0)
    //{
    //  cout << "%" << (num * 1.0 / toc) * 100 << endl;
    //}
    std::bitset<N> bitset = num;
    // 'to_string' вернет строку std::string формата '000...0111'
    //std::cout << "Binary : " << bitset.to_string<char, 
    std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >() << std::endl;
    //string s = bitset.to_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, 
    std::allocator<char> >();
    vector<int> spin(N);
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
    {
        if (bitset[i])
        {
            spin[i] = 1;
        }
        else
        {
            spin[i] = -1;
        }
        //cout << "spin" << i << "= " << spin[i] << endl;
    }

    E[num] = -CountSumflip(J, spin) - CountBM(spin, Be);

    vector<int> spinflip(N);
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
    {
        spinflip[i] = spin[i];
    }

    bool is_local = true;

    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
    {

        spinflip[i] = -1 * spin[i];
        Eflip[i]= -CountSumflip(J, spinflip) - CountBM(spinflip, Be);
        spinflip[i] = -1 * spin[i];
        if (Eflip[i] < E[num]) {
            is_local = false;
            break;
        }
    }

    if (is_local) {
        minimacount++;
    }
}

long double d = minimacount*1.0 / pow(2, N);
sfs2  << d << endl;




return 0;
}
8
  • 1
    If this is C++, then please add the c++ tag. And please write what exactly is not working. Commented Dec 16, 2018 at 10:37
  • Provide some minimal reproducible example in your question. In its current state, we cannot guess the code that you don't show in your question, and it matters a lot. Also give the programming language, and the context of your question (what exactly do you want to achieve). So edit your question much more (you probably need to add several paragraphs). Explain what is not working. Read How to debug small programs Commented Dec 16, 2018 at 10:41
  • 5
    Uh, this is an allocation of 262TB of RAM, I think you might not have enough RAM for this
    – PeterT
    Commented Dec 16, 2018 at 10:45
  • don't use toc = pow(2, N) - 1. Use (1L << N) - 1 instead which is tens or hundreds of times faster
    – phuclv
    Commented Dec 16, 2018 at 10:47
  • 2
    @LiubovMarkovich 2^35 should be around 262GB which is still a lot but everytime you go up 1 you double the amount of contiguous space of RAM you need. You should look into changing your approach to the problem
    – PeterT
    Commented Dec 16, 2018 at 10:53

1 Answer 1

4

To explain PeterT's comment:

const int N=45;
long int toc;
toc = pow(2, N) - 1;
vector<long double > E(toc);

Here toc is about 245, which is really a huge number, something above 30e12 i.e. 3 times 1013 (because 210 is slightly above a thousand and 25 is more than 30, and you could compute that in your head, without any device or paper).

You don't have enough resources to keep that much numbers in your computer (a long double takes 8 to 12 bytes each) Even if by some Harry Potter's like miracle you did get such a gigantic computer, since filling a long double number could take one or a few nanoseconds, you'll need at least many hours (since 30e12 nanoseconds is 30000 seconds, e.g. more than 8 hours) of CPU time to fill such a gigantic memory (of at least 8*30e12 bytes, e.g. 240 terabytes of RAM; at more than 1000€ for 128Gbytes of consumer-grade DRAM4, that would mean 200k€ for 2000 DDR4 SDRAM modules - no motherboard can handle that much!). Be aware of limits of computation and transcomputational problems.

When coding, keep in mind the actual capacity of your typical computer, and make a guess estimate of the resources (in memory, in disk, in time) needed by your program. The first rules of thumb are: your laptop or desktop computer has less than 128Gbytes of RAM (unless you paid a lot for it; a typical highend laptop has 16 or 32Gbytes in 2018; with 3000€ to 5000€ I could buy in 2019 a desktop with 128Gigabytes of RAM and 10Terabytes of SSD or disk), it has less than a few terabytes of disk; it makes about 3 to 20 "elementary operations" (I leave you to guess what these machine code instructions could be) every nanosecond. A whole day lasts 86400 seconds (you can round up that to 1e5). See http://norvig.com/21-days.html for a useful insight. A year is 31e6 seconds, a century is more than 3 billions (3.1e9) seconds.

For supercomputers, you need to pay a lot for them (or get some research grant to access them). Look into the TOP500 list to get an idea of their capacities. Today, they are highly parallel computers, and parallel computing is a difficult matter.

When you code something, you should make an educated guess on the resources required by your program. So understanding time complexity and other kinds of computational complexity (notably space complexity) is in practice essential for coding (you should avoid combinatorial explosion). Some problems are undecidable, others are intractable (read about computation complexity theory, learn about the travelling salesman problem). You need to ask yourself if your problem (or your pretended algorithm) fits into such areas.

3
  • Thanks! But you think the code is correct? I can try it on our server, maybee it will work.
    – Kim
    Commented Dec 16, 2018 at 10:52
  • 3
    You probably don't have access to a server with 262TB of RAM. In my understanding, no computer on Earth is powerful enough today. Commented Dec 16, 2018 at 10:54
  • 1
    Lol, I am stupid) As you can see, we wanted to check out some model using brute-force. To check your own methods. Apparently for large systems checking is problematic.
    – Kim
    Commented Dec 16, 2018 at 10:59

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