1

I'm working on a test and i'm asked how to make a "read" sleep or a "write" stop a process"

For the latter I don't understand why my sigpipe is, indeed raised, but isn't stopping the process:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <errno.h>
#define READING 0
#define WRITING 1
#define DESCRIPTOR_COUNT 2

void signal_handler(int signal){
    printf("sigpipe received\n");
}

int main(void)
{
    int tube[DESCRIPTOR_COUNT];
    pipe(tube);
//    signal(SIGPIPE, signal_handler);
    close(tube[READING]);

    if(write(tube[WRITING], "message", 8)<0)
        if(errno==EPIPE)
            printf("EPIPE returned\n");

    printf("123");

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Without signal() (quoted)

With signal() (unquoted)

SIGPIPE is indeed received, but in the case I don't handle it the process should stop, but since I can write "123" this means the process wasn't stopped. Why?

Also I'm on Fedora 28, i'm using codeblocks 17.12.

Was SIGPIPE ignored...? Reason?

SOLUTION ?

struct sigaction action;
action.sa_handler = SIG_DFL;
sigaction(SIGPIPE, &action, 0);

Replacing signal() with this will have the default behaviour as expected!

EDIT I've now changed the title from "SIGPIPE doesn't stop process" to "Why was default SIGPIPE handler changed?"

======================================================

Answer

After talking with the guys from codeblocks, codeblocks uses wxWidgets, and on linux (fedora 28 here) wxWidgets uses gtk library, as explained by Mark Plotnick in the comments, gtk changes the signal handler for SIGPIPE, since codeblocks runs codes using a fork or an exec, the code run through codeblocks is influenced by gtk library.

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  • 1
    Hmm, works for me, Linux. What's the platform? Does it work with this minimal reproducible example? If SIGPIPE is ignored, write will return EPIPE. Is that the case? Dec 16 '18 at 12:08
  • Fedora 28, and epipe isn't returned :/
    – Sheed
    Dec 16 '18 at 12:12
  • 1
    write()==EPIPE ... :: write returns -1 on error, and sets errno to EPIPE. Dec 16 '18 at 12:57
  • 1
    Try it from the commandline. Dec 16 '18 at 13:39
  • 1
    Ran codeblocks under gdb. Turns out gtk library is making process ignore sigpipe, in several places. First one is github.com/linuxmint/gtk/blob/master/gtk/gtkmain.c#L689 . Comments say Since 2.18, GTK+ calls signal (SIGPIPE, SIG_IGN) during initialization, to ignore SIGPIPE signals, since these are almost never wanted in graphical applications. If you do need to handle SIGPIPE for some reason, reset the handler after gtk_init(), but notice that other libraries (e.g. libdbus or gvfs) might do similar things. May want to file a feature request with codeblocks folks. Dec 18 '18 at 19:33
3

The behaviour you are reporting is consistent with the Code::Blocks IDE setting, implicitly or explicitly, the SIGPIPE behaviour to SIG_IGN. This is readily inherited. It isn't what I'd expect — I'd expect your program to be launched with SIGPIPE (and, indeed, all other signals) set to SIG_DFL, the default signal behaviour. If this turns out to be the problem, you have the basis for a bug report to the developers of Code::Blocks. If it turns out not to be the problem, then we've got some hard thinking ahead to work out what actually is happening*.

You could demonstrate whether this is what's happening with Code::Blocks by paying attention to the return value from signal(), or by using sigaction() to interrogate the signal handling mode without modifying it.

For example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <errno.h>
#define READING 0
#define WRITING 1
#define DESCRIPTOR_COUNT 2

static void signal_handler(int signum)
{
    // Lazy; normally, I'd format the signal number into the string, carefully
    (void)signum;
    write(STDOUT_FILENO, "sigpipe received\n", sizeof("sigpipe received\n")-1);
}

int main(void)
{
    void (*handler)(int) = signal(SIGPIPE, signal_handler);

    if (handler == SIG_DFL)
        printf("old handler was SIG_DFL\n");
    else if (handler == SIG_IGN)
    {
        printf("old handler was SIG_IGN\n");
        (void)signal(SIGPIPE, SIG_IGN);
    }
    else
    {
        // Standard C does not allow a cast from function pointer to object pointer
        //printf("there was a non-standard handler installed (%p)\n", (void *)handler);
        printf("there was a non-standard handler installed\n");
    }

    int tube[DESCRIPTOR_COUNT];
    pipe(tube);    
    close(tube[READING]);

    if (write(tube[WRITING], "message", 8) < 0)
    {
        if (errno == EPIPE)
            printf("EPIPE returned\n");
        else
            printf("errno = %d\n", errno);
    }

    printf("123\n");

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Note that the standard idiom for setting a signal handler using signal() in a program was:

if (signal(signum, SIG_IGN) != SIG_IGN)
    signal(signum, signal_handler);

This means that if a program was protected from signals, it stays protected. If it was handling signals (by default, or perhaps explicitly by a prior call to signal()), then you install your own signal handler. Equivalent code using sigaction() would be:

struct sigaction sa;
if (sigaction(signum, 0, &sa) == 0 && sa.sa_handler != SIG_IGN)
{
    sa.sa_handler = signal_handler;
    sa.sa_flag &= ~SA_SIGINFO;
    sigaction(signum, sa, 0);
}

(One advantage of this: the structure is initialized by the call to sigaction(), so there's no need to fiddle with the masks. The tweak to the flags ensures that the basic handler, not the extended handler, is used.)

When I compile the source code (pipe13.c) into program pipe13 and run it, I get:

$ make pipe13
gcc -O3 -g -std=c11 -Wall -Wextra -Werror -Wmissing-prototypes -Wstrict-prototypes pipe13.c -o pipe13
$ pipe13
old handler was SIG_DFL
sigpipe received
EPIPE returned
123
$ (trap '' 13; pipe13)
old handler was SIG_IGN
EPIPE returned
123
$

This variant uses sigaction() to interrogate the signal handling:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <errno.h>
#define READING 0
#define WRITING 1
#define DESCRIPTOR_COUNT 2

int main(void)
{
    struct sigaction sa;
    if (sigaction(SIGPIPE, 0, &sa) != 0)
        fprintf(stderr, "siagaction() failed\n");
    else if (sa.sa_handler == SIG_DFL)
        printf("old handler was SIG_DFL\n");
    else if (sa.sa_handler == SIG_IGN)
        printf("old handler was SIG_IGN\n");
    else
        printf("there was a non-standard handler installed\n");

    int tube[DESCRIPTOR_COUNT];
    pipe(tube);    
    close(tube[READING]);

    if (write(tube[WRITING], "message", 8) < 0)
    {
        if (errno == EPIPE)
            printf("EPIPE returned\n");
        else
            printf("errno = %d\n", errno);
    }

    printf("123\n");

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

When run (program pipe83), I get:

$ pipe83
old handler was SIG_DFL
$ echo $?
141
$ (trap '' 13; pipe83)
old handler was SIG_IGN
EPIPE returned
123
$

Note that with the default signal handling, the program terminates before printing 123. POSIX shells encode 'child died from signal N' by reporting the exit status as 128 + N; SIGPIPE is 13, so 141 indicates that the shell died from a SIGPIPE signal. (Yes, modern youngsters would probably write (trap '' PIPE; pipe83) and it works — such niceties weren't available when I learned shell programming.)

It would not be all that hard to generalize the code to test whether Code::Blocks sets any other signals to other than the default handling. It can be a little fiddly, though, if you want to adapt to which signals are available on a machine.


* In chat, we established that the program is run in a VMware image running Fedora 28, hosted on a Windows 10 machine. Because of this, there are enough possible places for there to be trouble that it is not clear that the problem is necessarily in Code::Blocks — it is simply not clear where the problem originates. However, the problem does indeed seem to be that the test program is started with SIGPIPE handling set to SIG_IGN instead of SIG_DFL when it is run from Code::Blocks.

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  • Code::Blocks IDE setting, implicitly or explicitly, the SIGPIPE behaviour to SIG_IGN why would codeblocks decide to change the default behaviour? Even though it's using gnu gcc which declares that the default behaviour should be to terminate the process? cf: gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/…
    – Sheed
    Dec 16 '18 at 16:44
  • I don't know — I didn't write Code::Blocks and I've not inspected the code. But one possible reason is that Code::Blocks doesn't want to get SIGPIPE signals itself when it runs the compiler, for example, so it ignores the signal to force the write() system call to report EPIPE errors instead. Another possibility is that Code::Blocks is launched with SIGPIPE ignored and it never changes that status. Note that I only claimed "consistent with" — and provided code that would allow you (as the OP) to test whether Code::Blocks is indeed launching your program with SIGPIPE ignored. Dec 16 '18 at 16:48
  • It isn't what I expect, but it is hard to detect how Code::Blocks is launched and which signal dispositions it has when launched vs what it sets for itself (and doesn't reset for its children). It could be a bug in Code::Blocks; it could be a bug in whatever you use to launch Code::Blocks. I don't pontificate on why it is as it is; I'm merely offering a way to help you detect what is going on, which will give you an explanation for what you see. If you really want to fix it, you'll write a program that resets all signals to SIG_DFL and then executes the program given as its arguments. Dec 16 '18 at 16:52
  • Thank you for your time. But I get storage size of ‘sa’ isn’t known
    – Sheed
    Dec 16 '18 at 16:56
  • Then you need to activate the POSIX extensions (#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 700 or #define _POSIX_C_SOURCE 200809L before the first include. If that doesn't work, then you probably can't use sigaction() on your machine; use signal() code instead. Dec 16 '18 at 16:58
0

Code::Blocks is not a compiler, just an IDE. It (probably) runs the GCC compiler. And the GCC compiler don't matter much for signal handling. Read signal(7) and signal-safety(7) for more (calling printf inside a signal handler is forbidden because printf is not async-signal-safe so your printf("sigpipe received\n"); inside a signal handler is undefined behavior). Signal handling is done mostly by the Linux kernel (see its source code on kernel.org) with a small bit of it handled by your C standard library, probably GNU glibc.

It seems codeblocks changes the default signal handler for SIGPIPE

This is very unlikely (and almost certainly false). You could use strace(1) on your program to understand what system calls it is doing.

  printf("123");

You forgot a \n. Remember that stdout is usually line-buffered. Or you should call fflush(3).

When you run a program from inside Code::Blocks it could run without a terminal. I strongly recommend running your program inside a terminal emulator (see tty(4) and pty(7)). The C standard library is permitted to use something like isatty(3) to behave differently when stdout is or is not a tty (in particular, buffering is done differently, see setvbuf(3)). Read the tty demystified and termios(3).

You could also try to run your program by redirecting its stdin, stdout, stderr to a file or a pipe (perhaps using |& cat or |& less with bash or zsh), or anything which is not a tty.

BTW, Code::Blocks is free software. You can study its source code to understand what it is doing.

Consider also using stdbuf(1) to run your program with different buffering operations.

3
  • As you said it's using gcc compiler, the thing is in commandline SIGPIPE stops the process, "123" is not printed, using "compile and build" in codeblocks gives me a different behaviour, it means codeblocks is doing something
    – Sheed
    Dec 16 '18 at 14:11
  • I'm sure that the file I'm compiling in commandline is the exact same file i'm using on codeblocks, I've even "clean" and re"build" my file on codeblocks, i've checked in commandline the file i was compiling with cat main.c it's the same one.
    – Sheed
    Dec 16 '18 at 14:19
  • Sir i've read you but the heart of the matter is not whether printf() is printing on the right stream, the instruction printf() is after the instruction write() , it shouldn't even be processed.
    – Sheed
    Dec 16 '18 at 14:27

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