-3

I have such a list:

for i in [100, 1000, 10000]:
    print(i)

How could I reproduce it with range

for i in range(100, 10000, 100)
    print(i)

the above code does not work as expected.

  • The last parameter for the range method is stride. Why do you expect it to work the way your 1st code example does? – shahkalpesh Dec 16 '18 at 13:05
  • 6
    (10 ** x for x in range(2, 5)) – Nils Werner Dec 16 '18 at 13:06
  • 1
    You are missing :. – CodeIt Dec 16 '18 at 13:06
  • for i in range(3): print ('100'+(i*'0')) - since it does not matter if you print an integer or a string. – usr2564301 Dec 16 '18 at 13:10
8

You are printing increasing powers of ten, so you can do this:

>>> for i in range(2, 5):
...     print(pow(10, i))
... 
100
1000
10000

Edit

As Graham observes in the comments, you can also do

>>> for i in range(2, 5):
...     print(10 ** i)
... 
100
1000
10000

if you prefer the ** notation for exponentiation.

  • For other readers, note also that exponentiation can be done in python using the ** operator. So the 2nd line could be rewritten as print(10 ** i), where a ** b is "a to the power b". – Graham Dec 16 '18 at 13:10
  • This is a good solution but I prefer the@Nils Werner solution's. – R. García Dec 16 '18 at 13:10
  • @Graham That's a good point; when writing I thought pow() was faster than **, but apparently they perform similarly, whereas math.pow is slower. – snakecharmerb Dec 16 '18 at 13:14
4

With a single line:

print(*(10 ** n for n in range(2, 5)), sep='\n')

Not the * operator, which is used to unpack the tuple. The ** finds powers of 10, and sep denotes the string which is put between elements print outputs.

As @Walter notes in the comments, this method is not particular efficient for larger ranges. @snakecharmerb's method with a for loop is the recommenced choice in those cases.

  • 1
    That's neat :-) – snakecharmerb Dec 16 '18 at 13:16
  • 1
    this allocates the whole tuple, not a good idea if the range is big – Walter Tross Dec 16 '18 at 13:33
  • 1
    @WalterTross Thanks for the feedback, tried to add that in – Ayxan Dec 16 '18 at 13:37
2

There are a couple of options

import numpy as np
for i in np.logspace(2, 4, num = 3, endpoint = True, dtype = np.int):
    print(i)

or (edit based on @Graham comment)

for i in (10**k for k in range(2, 5)):
    print(i)
  • 1
    you shouldn't presume that everyone knows what you mean by np – Walter Tross Dec 16 '18 at 13:10
  • 1
    @WalterTross You're right. Thanks – caverac Dec 16 '18 at 13:11
  • In the second case, there's absolutely no point in making it a list using the [ and ]; it's simply not optimally memory efficient for large ranges, and therefore a bad practice. Instead, you should make it a generator expression using parentheses: (10**k for k in range(2, 5)) – Graham Dec 18 '18 at 12:20
  • @Graham Absolutely right, just updated it. Thanks – caverac Dec 18 '18 at 13:12

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