4

You can easily allow subscript access to your own classes using AT-POS:

class Foo
{
    has @.grid;

    method AT-POS($x) is rw { return-rw @!grid[$x] }
    method Str { '<' ~ @!grid.join(' ') ~ '>' }
    method gist { self.Str }
}

my $foo = Foo.new(:grid(<a b c d e>));
say $foo;
say $foo[2];
$foo[3] = 'z';
say $foo;

output:

<a b c d e>
c
<a b c z e>

But I need two-dimensional subscript access. I've figured out how to make this work for reading, but it dies when writing:

class Bar
{
    has @.grid;

    method AT-POS($y, $x) is rw { return-rw @!grid[$y;$x] }
    method Str { '<' ~ @!grid».join(' ').join("\n ") ~ '>' }
    method gist { self.Str }
}

my $bar = Bar.new(:grid(<a b c d e>, <f g h i j>, <k l m n o>));
say $bar;
say $bar[1;2];
$bar[2;3] = 'z';
say $bar;

output:

<a b c d e
 f g h i j
 k l m n o>
h
Too few positionals passed; expected 3 arguments but got 2
  in method AT-POS at ./p6subscript line 25
  in block <unit> at ./p6subscript line 33

Is there any way to make this work?

  • First, 2;3 is a semilist, that is, a list of lists. If you change that to $bar[2,3] it's not goint to complain; however, it's not going to be calling AT-POS either. – jjmerelo Dec 16 '18 at 13:27
  • $bar[2,3] isn't a multidimensional subscript, so not what I need here. – mscha Dec 16 '18 at 13:53
3

My solution would be (provided we only have 2 dimensions):

class Bar {
    has @.grid;

    method TWEAK() { $_ .= Array for @!grid }
    method AT-POS(|c) is raw { @!grid.AT-POS(|c) }
    method Str { '<' ~ @!grid».join(' ').join("\n ") ~ '>' }
    method gist { self.Str }
}

The TWEAK will convert any lists that were given to arrays if they're not already. The is raw on AT-POS is all that is needed: return-rw is a very roundabout way of doing that.

  • Thanks, that's perfect! – mscha Dec 17 '18 at 11:24
5

Somehow, the AT-POS method is not being called. The documentation mentions the use of ASSIGN-POS instead, so here we go:

class Bar
{
    has @.grid is rw;

    method AT-POS($y, $x) is rw { say "AT-POS $y, $x"; return-rw @!grid[$y;$x] }
    method ASSIGN-POS($y, $x, $new) { say "ASSIGN-POS $y, $x"; @!grid[$y;$x] = $new }
    method Str { '<' ~ @!grid».join(' ').join("\n ") ~ '>' }
    method gist { self.Str }
}

my $bar = Bar.new(:grid(<a b c d e>, <f g h i j>, <k l m n o>));
say $bar;
say $bar[1;2];
$bar[2;3] = 'z';
say $bar;

Which, interestingly, yields another error:

Cannot modify an immutable List ((k l m n o)) in method ASSIGN-POS at semilist-so.p6 line 8 in block <unit> at semilist-so.p6 line 16

So the problem is not really the syntax, but the fact that you are working with immutable lists. You should use Arrays, which are mutable, and you'll be able to do that.

class Bar
{
    has @.grid is rw;

    method AT-POS($y, $x) is rw { return-rw @!grid[$y;$x] }
    method ASSIGN-POS($y, $x, $new) { @!grid[$y;$x] = $new }
    method Str { '<' ~ @!grid».join(' ').join("\n ") ~ '>' }
    method gist { self.Str }
}

my $bar = Bar.new(:grid([<a b c d e>], [<f g h i j>], [<k l m n o>]));
say $bar;
say $bar[1;2];
$bar[2;3] = 'z';
say $bar;
  • 1
    Thanks, that'll teach me to skim through the documentation. 😳 I've taken the liberty to add a working example to your answer. Also removed the rw stuff, since it's not necessary anymore. Still, it's weird that my original one-dimensional example worked while the two-dimensional example bailed. – mscha Dec 16 '18 at 13:51
  • 1
    Actually, after (finally) reading the documentation more carefully, you should make AT-POS rw, as ASSIGN-POS is only used in simple cases; so I restored that. (And $bar[0;0]++ does indeed actually work.) – mscha Dec 16 '18 at 14:05
  • ASSIGN-POS is documented to be optional. If it fails with AT-POS alone, you might want to file a bug report... – Christoph Dec 16 '18 at 14:44
  • 1
    I tried one more thing: multi method AT-POS($y, $x) is rw { return-rw @!grid[$y;$x] }; multi method AT-POS($y) is rw { return-rw @!grid[$y] }. This actually works (without ASSIGN-POS). Looks like, when assigning, both variants of AT-POS are called for some reason; the actual assignment is to the correct one. – mscha Dec 16 '18 at 19:50

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