2

Following up on this great answer to a related question which gives us the ObjectDiff (which I have renamed to ObjectExclude for the purposes below)

I have a function that takes an object, and a list of properties I'd like to remove from a clone of that object. How do I tell Typescript what is happening here? The type should be the object passed in, minus the properties whose keys are passed in afterward.

type ObjectExclude<T, U> = Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, keyof U>>;

function removeProps<T extends object, U extends keyof T>(
  obj: T,
  ...propNames: U[]
): SomeType { // What type should this actually be?
  const objClone = { ...obj };
  propNames.forEach(p => delete objClone[p]);
  return objClone;
}

SomeType seems like a thing that can be derived, but I always just end up typecasting.

For example how can I tell typescript that b below is type {one: number, two: string} without manually typecasting?

const a = {one: 1, two: '2', three: true};
const b = removeProps(a, 'three'); // TS should just know the type here.

Looking at the code as a person who knows JS or TS, it is clear enough that b is of type

interface B {one: number; two: string}

I want TS to know that as well, without needing to tell it.

2 Answers 2

1

Typescript can construct an object type for you, based on the input strings you are using in your rest params. The implementation of removeProps below is exactly the same as above. Only the type definition has changed.

We construct a Z type for the sole purpose of excluding it from the T type.

function removeProps<T extends object, K extends keyof T, Z = {[P in K]: any}>(
  obj: T,
  ...propNames: K[]
): ObjectExclude<T, Z> {
  const objClone = { ...obj };
  propNames.forEach(p => delete objClone[p]);
  return objClone;
}

Now in your code (as of TS 3.2.2, but I believe this works all the way back to 2.8), you'll get this:

const a = {one: 1, two: '2', three: true};
const b = removeProps(a, 'three');
// Type for b: Pick<{one: number, two: string, three: boolean}, "one" | "two">

That basically means that the type is same as object a, but only containing properties "one" and "two".

Note: Technically the type of Z would be {[P in K]: T[K]}, but any works above because it is never used in any way: we only care about the properties, not the values, of Z.


Update:

@titian-cernicova-dragomir points out below that the whole Z type isn't even necessary. So really, all you need to get this done is

export function removeProps<T extends object, U extends keyof T>(
  obj: T,
  ...propNames: U[]
): Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, U>> {
  const objClone = { ...obj };
  propNames.forEach(p => delete objClone[p]);
  return objClone;
}

This just forgoes the ObjectExclude type by directly using the types from which it is composed.

2
  • 2
    Z is really not necessary. You can just type the return as Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, K>>. Commented Dec 17, 2018 at 21:00
  • Thanks for this guys - exactly what I was looking for.
    – codeepic
    Commented Feb 11, 2022 at 14:13
-1

I believe that you could use Partial<T> as the return type

2
  • A partial makes everything optional. What I wanted was a type representing an object which had the same shape, but without certain properties. Not with certain properties marked as optional.
    – Don
    Commented Dec 20, 2018 at 2:38
  • To further explain for folks who may not know: Typescript provides a generic type called Partial<T> which makes all properties optional. So if type A = {one: number, two: string, three: boolean}, then Partial<A> is the same as {one?: number, two?: string, three?: boolean}. What I was after in the question above was something that would yield a type that looked more like {one: number, two: string}. Moreover, I needed TS to come up with the type intelligently. (I will edit the question to be more clear.)
    – Don
    Commented Dec 20, 2018 at 13:43

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