54

If I have a string variable who's value is "john is 17 years old" how do I tokenize this using spaces as the delimeter? Would I use awk?

5 Answers 5

77
$ string="john is 17 years old"
$ tokens=( $string )
$ echo ${tokens[*]}

For other delimiters, like ';'

$ string="john;is;17;years;old"
$ OLDIFS="$IFS"
$ IFS=';' tokens=( $string )
$ echo ${tokens[*]}
$ IFS="$OLDIFS" # restore IFS
7
  • Very nice, feels much more like an array. Dec 21, 2013 at 21:35
  • echo ${tokens[]} doesn't work for me I get 'bash: ${tokens[}: bad substitution ' error.
    – JPM
    Mar 11, 2020 at 16:04
  • you are missing the *: $ tokens=( a ); $ echo ${tokens[]}; -bash: ${tokens[]}: bad substitution $ echo ${tokens[*]}; a Mar 11, 2020 at 21:15
  • 1
    changing IFS and then building array this way makes IFS assignment "permanent", not just for the duration of the array building. see stackoverflow.com/questions/62855752/…
    – morgwai
    Jan 27, 2022 at 18:20
  • Your code changes IFS. I've spent 1h figuring out why my script fails. You need to add IFS=$' \t\n' # set IFS to the default, works with zsh, ksh, bash.. More info.
    – pmor
    Oct 28, 2022 at 17:31
70

Use the shell's automatic tokenization of unquoted variables:

$ string="john is 17 years old"
$ for word in $string; do echo "$word"; done
john
is
17
years
old

If you want to change the delimiter you can set the $IFS variable, which stands for internal field separator. The default value of $IFS is " \t\n" (space, tab, newline).

$ string="john_is_17_years_old"
$ (IFS='_'; for word in $string; do echo "$word"; done)
john
is
17
years
old

(Note that in this second example I added parentheses around the second line. This creates a sub-shell so that the change to $IFS doesn't persist. You generally don't want to permanently change $IFS as it can wreak havoc on unsuspecting shell commands.)

2
  • for your examples, how would you re-use the third token (17) for example? use the for loop and count tokens?
    – kurumi
    Mar 22, 2011 at 7:31
  • 1
    @Allen, then i can do this IFS="_";set -- $string; echo $2. or directly set it to an array like what dtmilano did. There is no need to use a for loop isn't it?
    – kurumi
    Mar 24, 2011 at 5:40
14
$ string="john is 17 years old"
$ set -- $string
$ echo $1
john
$ echo $2
is
$ echo $3
17
2

you can try something like this :

#!/bin/bash
n=0
a=/home/file.txt
for i in `cat ${a} | tr ' ' '\n'` ; do
   str=${str},${i}
   let n=$n+1
   var=`echo "var${n}"`
   echo $var is ... ${i}
done
1
  • The use of tr makes this the best solution. Your exemple code could be much simpler : echo john is 17 years old | tr ' ' '\n'
    – Titou
    May 11, 2017 at 8:49
1

with POSIX extended regex:

$ str='a b     c d'
$ echo "$str" | sed -E 's/\W+/\n/g' | hexdump -C
00000000  61 0a 62 0a 63 0a 64 0a                           |a.b.c.d.|
00000008

this is like python's re.split(r'\W+', str)

\W matches a non-word character,
including space, tab, newline, return, [like the bash for tokenizer]
but also including symbols like quotes, brackets, signs, ...

... except the underscore sign _,
so snake_case is one word, but kebab-case are two words.

leading and trailing space will create an empty line.

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