13

I need to create a program that checks the list in the array is sorted. I have three input data:

1,2,3,4,5

1,2,8,9,9

1,2,2,3,2

So here is my code:

let sorts = +gets(); // 3
let list = [];

for (let i = 0; i < sorts; i++) {
    list[i] = gets().split(',').map(Number); // The Array will be: [ [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ], [ 1, 2, 8, 9, 9 ], [ 1, 2, 2, 3, 2 ] ]
}

for (let i = 0; i < list[i][i].length; i++){
    if (list[i][i] < list[i][i +1]) {
        print('true');
    } else {
        print('false');
    }
}

I need to print for all lists on new line true or false. For this example my output needs to be:

true

true

false

I have no idea how to resolve this.

marked as duplicate by Barmar arrays Dec 18 '18 at 17:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5

var str = ["1,2,3,4,5", "1,2,8,9,9", "1,2,2,3,2"];

for (var i in str){
    var list = str[i].split(',').map(Number);
    console.log(list);
    var isSorted = true;
    for(var j = 0 ; j < list.length - 1 ; j++){
        if(list[j] > list[j+1]) {
            isSorted = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    console.log(isSorted);
}

15

How about something like this:

!![1,2,3,4,5].reduce((n, item) => n !== false && item >= n && item)
// true

!![1,2,8,9,9].reduce((n, item) => n !== false && item >= n && item)
// true 

!![1,2,2,3,2].reduce((n, item) => n !== false && item >= n && item)
// false

Reduce will literally reduce the array down to a single value - a boolean in our case.

Here, we are calling a function per iteration, the (n, item) is our function signature, it's body being n !== false && item >- n && item - we are making sure that n exists (n is our accumulator - read up!), testing if item is greater than n, and making sure item exists.

This happens for every element in your array. We then use !! to force the result into a tru boolean.

  • 6
    That's a clever one, though it would be worth to give the user an explanation, unexperienced programmers would never understand what's happening here. For sake of testing, here is a fiddle: jsfiddle.net/briosheje/46r1jm03 – briosheje Dec 18 '18 at 12:48
  • 4
    Indeed. [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5] will return false. – VisioN Dec 18 '18 at 12:52
  • 2
    @VisioN This is a very good point indeed. – Stuart Dec 18 '18 at 12:53
  • 1
    @KunalMukherjee Correct. That will be an exercise of OP though eh... :) – Stuart Dec 18 '18 at 12:59
  • 2
    Will this short circuit? – Bob Brinks Dec 18 '18 at 15:17
13

You can use array#every to check if each value is greater than the previous value.

const isSorted = arr => arr.every((v,i,a) => !i || a[i-1] <= v);
console.log(isSorted([1,2,3,4,5]));
console.log(isSorted([1,2,8,9,9])); 
console.log(isSorted([1,2,2,3,2]));

  • 1
    Make it shorter: arr.every((v,i,a) => !i || a[i-1] <= v) – VisioN Dec 18 '18 at 13:08
  • @VisioN Updated the solution. Thanks for the input. – Hassan Imam Dec 18 '18 at 13:09
  • Is it really good practice to use tricks like !i for i<1? Otherwise, probably the right way to do this. – JollyJoker Dec 18 '18 at 14:12
  • 1
    @JollyJoker I wouldn't call it a trick--it's equivalent to i === 0 (which might be more readable). This is the best solution on the thread because it combines early bailout with modern, functional syntax. – ggorlen Dec 18 '18 at 16:10
  • @ggorlen Some things are standard in Javascript that would be considered oddities to avoid in other languages – JollyJoker Dec 20 '18 at 8:15
8

Simply try this way by using slice method : It will check if previous element is less than the next element.If the condition is true for every element then it will return true else false

arr.slice(1).every((item, i) => arr[i] <= item);

Checkout this below sample as Demo

var arr = [[1,2,3,4,5],[1,2,8,9,9],[1,2,2,3,2],[0,1,2,3,4,5]];

function isArrayIsSorted (arr) {
  return arr.slice(1).every((item, i) => arr[i] <= item)
}

var result= [];
for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++){
result.push(isArrayIsSorted(arr[i]))
}
console.log(result);

  • 3
    This is very neat and tidy, have an upvote :) – Stuart Dec 18 '18 at 13:04
3

Sorted Number Lists

Including Negative Numbers, Zeros, and Adjacent Duplicates

Use every() method which will return true should all of the numbers be in order otherwise it will return false. The conditions are as follows:

(num <= arr[idx + 1]) || (idx === arr.length - 1)
  1. if the current number is less than or equal to the next number...

    OR...

  2. if the current index is equal to the last index...

    return 1 (truthy)
    

Demo

var arr0 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
var arr1 = [1, 2, 8, 9, 9];
var arr2 = [1, 2, 2, 3, 2];
var arr3 = [0, 0, 0, 1, 3];
var arr4 = [-3, 0, 1, 3, 3];
var arr5 = [-4, -2, 0, 0, -4];

function sorted(array) {
  return array.every(function(num, idx, arr) {
    return (num <= arr[idx + 1]) || (idx === arr.length - 1) ? 1 : 0;
  });
}

console.log(arr0 +' | '+sorted(arr0));
console.log(arr1 +' | '+sorted(arr1));
console.log(arr2 +' | '+sorted(arr2));
console.log(arr3 +' | '+sorted(arr3));
console.log(arr4 +' | '+sorted(arr4));
console.log(arr5 +' | '+sorted(arr5));

  • for [0, 1, 3, 4, 5] it returns false – Luca Rainone Dec 18 '18 at 13:28
  • See update, thanks @LucaRainone – zer00ne Dec 18 '18 at 13:43
  • The point is that the trick is dangerous. For example it does not works with negative numbers. [-2, 0, 3, 4, 5]. But also your solution does not work for [0, 0, 1, 4, 5] – Luca Rainone Dec 18 '18 at 13:49
  • The callback for every gets value, index and the array. Aren't you comparing value to index? – JollyJoker Dec 18 '18 at 14:11
  • See update, thanks @LucaRainone – zer00ne Dec 18 '18 at 18:00
0

Maybe you can use this helping method that checks if is sorted correctly:

    var arr1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 4];
    var arr2 = [3, 2, 1];

		console.log(checkList(arr1));
		console.log(checkList(arr2));
    
    function checkList(arr) {
        for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
            if (arr[i + 1]) {
                if (arr[i] > arr[i + 1]) {
                    return false;
                }
            }

        }
        return true;
    }

0

There are plenty of ways how to do that. Here is mine

const isArraySorted = array =>
  array
  .slice(0) // clone array
  .sort((a, b) => a - b) // sort it
  .every((el, i) => el === array[i]) // compare with initial value)

0

You can check if stringified sorted copy of original array has same value as the original one. Might not be the most cool or performant one, but I like it's simplicity and clarity.

const arraysToCheck = [
  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
  [1, 2, 8, 9, 9],
  [1, 2, 2, 3, 2]
]

const isSorted = arraysToCheck.map(
  item => JSON.stringify([...item].sort((a, b) => a - b)) === JSON.stringify(item)
 );


console.log(isSorted);

-2

If i get what you mean, you want to know if an array is sorted or not. This is an example of such a solution, try it. I pasted some codes below.

var myArray=[1,4,3,6];

if(isSorted(myArray)){

    console.log("List is sorted");
}else{
    console.log("List is not sorted");
}

function isSorted(X){

var sorted=false;

for(var i=0;i<X.length;i++){

        var next=i+1;

    if (next<=X.length-1){

        if(X[i]>X[next]){
            sorted=false;
            break;
        }else{
            sorted=true;

        }
    }

}


return sorted;

}

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