29

I have an array and I am printing it like this:

echo "${data[*]}"

Output:

/QE-CI-RUN-71/workspace/QE-AU/57/testng-results_1.xml 
/QE-CI-RUN-71/workspace/QE-AU/57/testng-results_2.xml

I want to store the above output as a comma separated value. How can I achieve this in Bash?

The data array is dynamic, it may have any number of values.

4
  • 2
    echo "${data[*]}" shouldn't be generating newlines unless they're there inside the values themselves. Could you edit to include the output of declare -p data, so we can see what the actual form of the array is? (If instead of being an array it were actually just one big string with literal newlines in the first place, that would explain your current output). Dec 18, 2018 at 18:53
  • I've added the bash tag because POSIX shells do not allow arrays. If you meant a different shell, please correct this.
    – Adam Katz
    Dec 18, 2018 at 18:58
  • zsh one-line solution: echo "${${data[@]}//${IFS:0:1}/,}"
    – Adam Katz
    Dec 18, 2018 at 19:22
  • Does this answer your question? How can I join elements of an array in Bash?
    – Adam Katz
    Mar 3, 2021 at 19:54

5 Answers 5

35

There are a few ways to do this:

1. Join directly with printf (via Charles Duffy’s comment)

printf -v joined '%s,' "${data[@]}"
echo "${joined%,}"

The printf builtin implicitly joins arrays. You could print interactively like 3a below with a one-liner reading printf '%s,' "${data[@]}", but you'd be left with a trailing comma. (This method even works in POSIX shell, though you'd have to use $@ as your array since POSIX can't handle other array types).

2. Change the $IFS field separator (via chepner’s answer)

join_arr() {
  local IFS="$1"
  shift
  echo "$*"
}

join_arr , "${data[@]}"

This redefines the field separator within just the scope of this function so when the $data array is automatically expanded, it uses the desired delimiter instead of the first value of the global $IFS or (if it's empty or undefined) space.

This could be done without a function, but there's some nastiness about preserving $IFS: Charles Duffy notes that reverting IFS="$OLD_IFS" after temporarily reassigning it could evaluate to IFS="", but if $IFS was previously undefined, that's different from unset IFS and while it's possible to tease those apart, this functional approach is far cleaner thanks to its use of local to limit $IFS’s scope.

This solution only supports single-character delimiters. See #5 below for a similar function that supports delimiters of any length.

3a. Loop through its contents (and print incrementally)

delim=""
for item in "${data[@]}"; do
  printf "%s" "$delim$item"
  delim=","
done
echo # add a newline

If other code in that loop involves an external call (or even sleep 0.1), you'll actually watch this build piece by piece, which can be helpful in an interactive setting.

3b. Loop through its contents (and build a variable)

delim=""
joined=""
for item in "${data[@]}"; do
  joined="$joined$delim$item"
  delim=","
done
echo "$joined"

4. Save the array as a string and run replacement on it (note, the array must lack spaces*)

data_string="${data[*]}"
echo "${data_string//${IFS:0:1}/,}"

* This will only work if the first character of $IFS (space by default) does not exist in any of the array's items.

This uses bash pattern substitution: ${parameter//pattern/string} will replace each instance of pattern in $parameter with string. In this case, string is ${IFS:0:1}, the substring of $IFS starting at the beginning and ending after one character.

Z Shell (zsh) can do this in one nested parameter expansion:

echo "${${data[@]}//${IFS:0:1}/,}"

(Though Z Shell can also do it more elegantly with its dedicated join flag as echo "${(j:,:)data}" as noted by @DavidBaynard in a comment below this answer.)

5. Join with replacement in an implicit loop (via Nicholas Sushkin's answer to a duplicate question)

join_by() {
  local d="${1-}" f="${2-}"
  if shift 2; then
    printf %s "$f" "${@/#/$d}"
  fi
}

join_by , "${data[@]}"

This is very similar to #2 above (via chepner), but it uses pattern substitution rather than $IFS and therefore supports multi-character delimiters. $d saves the delimiter and $f saves the first item in the array (I'll say why in a moment). The real magic is ${@/#/$d}, which replaces the beginning (#) of each array element with the delimiter ($d). As you don't want to start with a delimiter, this uses shift to get past not only the delimiter argument but also the first array element (saved as $f), which is then printed right in front of the replacement.

printf has an odd behavior when you give it extra arguments as we do here. The template (%s) only specifies that there will be one argument, so the rest of the arguments act as if it's a loop and they're all concatenated onto each other. Consider changing that key line to printf "%s\n" "$f" "${@/#/$d}". You'll end up with a newline after each element. If you want a trailing newline after printing the joined array, do it with printf %s "$f" "${@/#/$d}" $'\n' (we need to use the $'…' notation to tell bash to interpret the escape; another way to do this would be to insert a literal newline, but then the code looks weird).

11
  • 3
    The "string-then-replacement" approach will change other spaces as well. Consider data=( "first item" "second item" "third item" ); you want output of first item,second item,third item, not first,item,second,item,third,item. Dec 18, 2018 at 19:00
  • 2
    In practice, btw, I would typically use printf -v var '%s,' "${data[@]}"; echo "${var%,}" -- doesn't change IFS, and doesn't make assumptions about what the data looks like. Dec 18, 2018 at 19:13
  • 3
    Curly brackets alone do not limit the scope of the change. That's the main difference between a command group and a subshell; the command group still executes in the current shell.
    – chepner
    Dec 18, 2018 at 20:05
  • 1
    @AdamKatz For zsh you can use "${(j:,:)data}" for the same thing. There is a subtlety around word splitting: > Note that this occurs before field splitting by the s:string: flag or the SH_WORD_SPLIT option. (Source: zsh.sourceforge.io/Doc/Release/…) Aug 14, 2021 at 17:36
  • 1
    @DavidBaynard – Thanks, I've added that to the answer. It doesn't get its own section since this is a Bash question, but I think it merits a mention.
    – Adam Katz
    Aug 16, 2021 at 1:33
11

To make it easier to localize the change of IFS, use a function:

join () {
  local IFS="$1"
  shift
  echo "$*"
}

join , "${data[@]}"
3
  • I like this. It solves the issue of overwriting $IFS and uses a syntax users of other languages will be quite familiar with.
    – Adam Katz
    Dec 18, 2018 at 19:15
  • 1
    There's a shorter way to localize the value, (IFS=,; echo "${data[*]}"), but at the cost of (almost certainly) forking a new process for the subshell.
    – chepner
    Dec 18, 2018 at 19:37
  • Curly brackets also don't localize the value of IFS. You have to use a subshell to do that. The benefit of the function is that you can use the local command to avoid overwriting the global value.
    – chepner
    Dec 18, 2018 at 20:04
3

If you want to separate with commas, make that be the first character in IFS:

data=( first second third )
IFS=,
echo "${data[*]}"

...emits:

first,second,third
2
  • 2
    Be careful about leaving $IFS defined in this way; you may not like what it does to commands later in your script.
    – Adam Katz
    Dec 18, 2018 at 20:21
  • 1
    Problem is that oIFS=$IFS; ...; IFS=$oIFS isn't a noop either -- it'll change unset IFS to IFS='', which are two different states with different behaviors (the former acts like IFS=$' \t\n'). The local approach, or scoping with a subshell, is appropriate if one wants to be safe -- and chepner's answer already covers them. I'd rather not write code that pretends to have safety features that don't really exist, and also consider any code that performs unquoted expansion without an explicit IFS value (or which fails to set IFS explicitly when running read) inherently broken. Dec 18, 2018 at 20:28
3

For ksh, try this!

foo=`echo $(echo ${data[@]}) | tr ' ' ','`

In this way you can control the delimiter by translating the space (default) to comma! (or any other you can think of) :)

1
printComma(){
    printf "%s," "${@:1:${#}-1}"
    printf "%s" "${@:${#}}"
}
printNewline(){
    printf "%s\n" "${@:1:${#}-1}"
    echo "${@:${#}}"
}
join () {
  local IFS="$1"
  shift
  echo "$*"
}
declare -a comma=(
    a
    b
    c
)
declare -a newline=(
    xyz
    abc
    def
    ghi
)
echo "\
Comma separated list $(printComma "${comma[@]}")
Newline list: $(printNewline "${newline[@]}")

Comma separated list $(join , "${comma[@]}")
Newline list: $(join \n "${newline[@]}")"
Comma separated list a,b,c
Newline list: xyz
abc
def
ghi

Comma separated list a,b,c
Newline list: xyznabcndefnghi

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