3

How can I get a string like

Namespace.IMyService.Do("1")

from the expression as demoed in this snip it:

IMyService myService = ...;
int param1 = 1;

myExpressionService.Get(c => myService.Do(param1));

I actually don't want to call Do unless a condition is met using the string that was generated.

6
  • 1
    is your sample correct? Do you really want "1" instead of 1? – Snowbear Mar 21 '11 at 22:19
  • 1
    Namespace.IMyService.Do("1") looks like an expression, not as string. Do you want to get "Namespace.IMyService.Do(\"1\")"? – Vlad Mar 21 '11 at 22:20
  • @Snowbear yes - I want the ToString() result of each parameter. – Daniel A. White Mar 21 '11 at 22:44
  • @Daniel: Will your expressions always be in the form x => foo.method(closureVariable)? – Cameron Mar 21 '11 at 23:34
  • No - it should be flexible to the number of parameters. – Daniel A. White Mar 21 '11 at 23:53
4

You will have to traverse Expression trees. Here is some sample code:

internal static class myExpressionService
{
    public static string Get(Expression<Action> expression)
    {
        MethodCallExpression methodCallExpression = (MethodCallExpression)expression.Body;
        var method = methodCallExpression.Method;
        var argument = (ConstantExpression) methodCallExpression.Arguments.First();

        return string.Format("{0}.{1}({2})", method.DeclaringType.FullName, method.Name, argument.Value);
    }
}

It works if called in this way: string result = myExpressionService.Get(() => myService.Do(1));

The output is: Namespace.IMyService.Do(1)

You can extend/update it to handle your scenario.

10
  • Should probably be argument.Value.ToString() and \"{2}\" – ChrisWue Mar 21 '11 at 22:49
  • @Chris, ToString is not needed. Also I removed quotes to make it easier to read. Anyway it is not completely what OP wants, just a direction. – Snowbear Mar 21 '11 at 22:52
  • @Snowbear: How do I call the action? – Daniel A. White Mar 21 '11 at 23:11
  • 1
    @Daniel, expression.Compile()() will do the job – Snowbear Mar 21 '11 at 23:15
  • This results in an InvalidCastException on my machine -- the first argument is a MemberExpression, not a ConstantExpression – Cameron Mar 21 '11 at 23:22
1

This would also work (though it's not particularly elegant):

public static string MethodCallExpressionRepresentation(this LambdaExpression expr)
{
    var expression = (MethodCallExpression)expr.Body;

    var arguments = string.Join(", ", expression.Arguments.OfType<MemberExpression>().Select(x => {
        var tempInstance = ((ConstantExpression)x.Expression).Value;
        var fieldInfo = (FieldInfo)x.Member;
        return "\"" + fieldInfo.GetValue(tempInstance).ToString() + "\"";
    }).ToArray());

    return expression.Object.Type.FullName + "." + expression.Method.Name + "(" + arguments + ")";
}

You can call it like this:

Expression<Action> expr = c => myService.Do(param1));
var repr = expr.MethodCallExpressionRepresentation();    // Namespace.IMyService.Do("1")
0

You should be able to call .ToString() on the resulting expression. According to the MS documentation ToString() returns the textual representation of the expression. Have you tried that?

1
  • It returns something like () => value(Namespace.Program+<>c__DisplayClass0).myService.Do(1) in this case which is slightly different – Snowbear Mar 21 '11 at 22:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.