7

The statement is like SELECT * FROM db.table group by id desc;

Would raise an error like

15:02:24 SELECT * FROM db.table group by id desc LIMIT 0, 10 Error Code: 1064. You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'desc LIMIT 0, 10' at line 1 0.00014 sec

on MySQL 8.0.13 in Ubuntu 18.04 Desktop 64bit

which would be fine on MySQL 5.7 in Windows or CentOS or Ubuntu.

I know basically, the select statement is like.

SELECT statement... [WHERE condition | GROUP BY `field_name(s)` HAVING condition] ORDER BY `field_name(s)` [ASC | DESC];

So is this 5.7's problem not to issue the error?

Or something more complicated on SQL standard?

9
  • Without order by clause, desc does not make sense. And I suspect that this query should fail in version 5.7 too Commented Dec 19, 2018 at 7:18
  • 1
    The error indicate a missing order by clause. DESC is used in the order by, not the group by. Commented Dec 19, 2018 at 7:27
  • 2
    This should be treated as a bug, but I doubt it will be - in older versions of MySQL the group by clause responded to (i.e. permitted) ASC/DESC so it got used a short hand way of ordering the final result. see rextester.com/NJDD72740 Commented Dec 19, 2018 at 7:30
  • 4
    If you look up the select statement in the manual dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/select.html you will see that up to 5.7 asc|desc are optional modifiers to the group by statement which are no longer present from 8.0.and if you look at the upgrade documentation dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/… this deprecation is documented.
    – P.Salmon
    Commented Dec 19, 2018 at 8:04
  • 1
    @P.Salmon could you make your comment as an answer? So we can mark the question as solved. Commented Dec 19, 2018 at 8:44

4 Answers 4

10

I have the same issue, so for MySQL 8, I used the sql like that:

SELECT * FROM db.table 
group by id 
order by id desc 
5

Taking from @P.Salmon's comment for the question.

If you look up the select statement in the manual http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/select.html you will see that up to 5.7 asc|desc are optional modifiers to the group by statement which are no longer present from 8.0.and if you look at the upgrade documentation https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/upgrading-from-previous-series.html#upgrade-sql-changes This deprecation is documented.

Since this situation, @Linda Li's answer could be a good option.

0

This query makes no sense:

SELECT *
FROM db.table 
GROUP BY id DESC;

You are doing an aggregation query. So (presumably), the table has multiple rows per id. Those are condensed down to one row. What values should be used for the other columns? It is sad that MySQL ever supported this syntax. So a welcome change is that ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY is now the default.

A small hint is that using an aggregation query with no aggregation functions is suspicious.

Perhaps you want:

select id, min(col1), min(col2), . . .
from t
group by id;

Or more likely, you want a particular row, such as the "earliest" or "most recent", something like:

select t.*
from t
where t.createdAt = (select min(t2.createdAt) from t t2 where t2.id = t.id);
4
  • The original query is something like select id,min(col1) ... , however my point is about the second part. Commented Dec 19, 2018 at 14:52
  • It is fine that it is your personal opinion, that "not full group by" is bad. Actually this is a great feature which saves a lot of time for developers. It is well documented, that MySQL will pick a random value from the grouped rows. So if you know that all values are identical, this is a great shortcut. Other databases which do not support this feature make we want to jump out of the window when I run into this problem. Just my personal opinion: this feature should be in the next SQL standard. Commented Jan 12, 2020 at 23:31
  • @drfumanchu . . . Interesting that the designers of MySQL have removed this feature from MySQL 8.0 (at least using the default settings). Given that the designers of SQL also have left this functionality out and almost no other databases support such syntax, your opinion would seem to be a minority opinion. Commented Jan 13, 2020 at 1:25
  • ANY_VALUE() is now in the SQL:2023 standard, for better or for worse. It is not widely supported yet. modern-sql.com/caniuse/any_value Commented Apr 15 at 14:29
0

Clearly explained here WL#8693: Remove the syntax for GROUP BY ASC and DESC

https://dev.mysql.com/worklog/task/?id=8693

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.