95

I saw the below code in this Quora post:

#include <stdio.h>

struct mystruct { int enabled:1; };
int main()
{
  struct mystruct s;
  s.enabled = 1;
  if(s.enabled == 1)
    printf("Is enabled\n"); // --> we think this to be printed
  else
    printf("Is disabled !!\n");
}

In both C & C++, the output of the code is unexpected,

Is disabled !!

Though the "sign bit" related explanation is given in that post, I am unable to understand, how it is possible that we set something and then it doesn't reflect as it is.

Can someone give a more elaborate explanation?


Note: Both the tags & are required, because their standards slightly differ for describing the bit-fields. See answers for C specification and C++ specification.

  • 44
    Since the bitfield is declared as int i think it only can hold the values 0 and -1. – Osiris Dec 19 '18 at 14:45
  • 5
    just think of it how int stores -1. All bits are set to 1. Hence, if you only have one bit it clearly has to be -1. So 1 and -1 in the 1 bit int are the same. Change the check to 'if (s.enabled != 0)' and it works. Because 0 it can't be. – Jürgen Dec 19 '18 at 15:09
  • 2
    It is true that these rules are the same in C and C++. But according to the tag usage policies, we should only tag this as C and refrain from cross-tagging when not needed. I'll remove the C++ part, it should not affect any posted answers. – Lundin Dec 19 '18 at 16:06
  • 7
    Have you tried changing it to struct mystruct { unsigned int enabled:1; };? – ChatterOne Dec 19 '18 at 16:08
  • 3
    Kindly read the C and C++ tag policies, particularly the part regarding cross-tagging C and C++ both, established through community consensus here. I'm not going into some rollback war, but this question is incorrectly tagged C++. Even if the languages happen to have some slight difference because of various TC, then make a separate question about the difference between C and C++. – Lundin Dec 20 '18 at 8:04
76

Bit-fields are incredibly poorly defined by the standard. Given this code struct mystruct {int enabled:1;};, then we don't know:

  • How much space this occupies - if there are padding bits/bytes and where they are located in memory.
  • Where the bit is located in memory. Not defined and also depends on endianess.
  • Whether an int:n bitfield is to be regarded as signed or unsigned.

Regarding the last part, C17 6.7.2.1/10 says:

A bit-field is interpreted as having a signed or unsigned integer type consisting of the specified number of bits 125)

Non-normative note explaining the above:

125) As specified in 6.7.2 above, if the actual type specifier used is int or a typedef-name defined as int, then it is implementation-defined whether the bit-field is signed or unsigned.

In case the bitfield is to be regarded as signed int and you make a bit of size 1, then there is no room for data, only for the sign bit. This is the reason why your program might give weird results on some compilers.

Good practice:

  • Never use bit-fields for any purpose.
  • Avoid using signed int type for any form of bit manipulation.
  • 4
    At work we have static_asserts on the size and address of bitfields just to make sure that they are not padded. We use bitfields for hardware registers in our firmware. – Michael Dec 19 '18 at 19:38
  • 2
    @Lundin: The ugly thing with #define-d masks and offsets is that your code gets littered with shifts and bit-wise AND/OR operators. With bitfields the compiler takes care of that for you. – Michael Dec 20 '18 at 8:25
  • 3
    @Michael With bitfields the compiler takes care of that for you. Well, that's OK if your standards for "takes care of that" are "non-portable" and "unpredictable". Mine are higher than that. – Andrew Henle Dec 20 '18 at 10:56
  • 2
    @AndrewHenle Leushenko is saying that from the perspective of just the C standard itself, it is up to the implementation whether or not it chooses to follow the x86-64 ABI or not. – mtraceur Dec 20 '18 at 22:41
  • 3
    @AndrewHenle Right, I agree on both points. My point was that I think your disagreement with Leushenko boils down to the fact that you're using "implementation defined" to refer only to things neither strictly defined by the C standard nor strictly defined by the platform ABI, and he's using it to refer to anything not strictly defined by just the C standard. – mtraceur Dec 20 '18 at 23:20
57

I am unable to understand, how is it possible that we set something and then it doesn't show up as it is.

Are you asking why it compiles vs. gives you an error?

Yes, it should ideally give you an error. And it does, if you use your compiler's warnings. In GCC, with -Werror -Wall -pedantic:

main.cpp: In function 'int main()':
main.cpp:7:15: error: overflow in conversion from 'int' to 'signed char:1' 
changes value from '1' to '-1' [-Werror=overflow]
   s.enabled = 1;
           ^

The reasoning for why this is left up to being implementation-defined vs. an error may have more to do with historical usages, where requiring a cast would mean breaking old code. The authors of the standard may believe warnings were enough to pick up the slack for those concerned.

To throw in some prescriptivism, I'll echo @Lundin's statement: "Never use bit-fields for any purpose." If you have the kind of good reasons to get low-level and specific about your memory layout details that would get you to thinking you needed bitfields in the first place, the other associated requirements you almost certainly have will run up against their underspecification.

(TL;DR - If you're sophisticated enough to legitimately "need" bit-fields, they're not well-defined enough to serve you.)

  • 14
    The authors of the standard were on holidays the day the bit-field chapter was designed. So the janitor had to do it. There is no rationale about anything regarding how bit-fields are designed. – Lundin Dec 19 '18 at 15:00
  • 8
    There is no coherent technical rationale. But that leads me to conclude that there was a political rationale: to avoid making any of the existing code or implementations incorrect. But the result is that there's very little about bitfields that you can rely upon. – John Bollinger Dec 19 '18 at 15:20
  • 5
    @JohnBollinger There was definitely politics in place, that caused a lot of damage to C90. I once spoke with a member of the committee who explained the source of lots of the crap - the ISO standard could not be allowed to favour certain existing technologies. This is why we are stuck with moronic things like support for 1's complement and signed magnitude, implementation-defined signedness of char, support for bytes that aren't 8 bits etc etc. They weren't allowed to give moronic computers a market disadvantage. – Lundin Dec 19 '18 at 15:26
  • 1
    @Lundin It would be interesting to see a collection of writeups and post-mortems from people who believed tradeoffs had been made in error, and why. I wonder how much study of these "we did that last time, and it did/didn't work out" has become institutional knowledge to inform the next such case, vs. just stories in people's heads. – HostileFork Dec 19 '18 at 15:29
  • 1
    This is still listed as point no. 1 of the original principles of C in the C2x Charter: "Existing code is important, existing implementations are not." ... "no one implementation was held up as the exemplar by which to define C: It is assumed that all existing implementations must change somewhat to conform to the Standard." – Leushenko Dec 19 '18 at 16:00
22

This is implementation defined behavior. I am making the assumption that the machines you are running this on use twos-compliment signed integers and treat int in this case as a signed integer to explain why you don't enter if true part of the if statement.

struct mystruct { int enabled:1; };

declares enable as a 1 bit bit-field. Since it is signed, the valid values are -1 and 0. Setting the field to 1 overflows that bit going back to -1 (this is undefined behavior)

Essentially when dealing with a signed bit-field the max value is 2^(bits - 1) - 1 which is 0 in this case.

  • "ince it is signed, the valid values are -1 and 0". Who said it is signed? It's not defined but implementation-defined behavior. If it is signed, then the valid values are - and +. 2's complement doesn't matter. – Lundin Dec 19 '18 at 14:56
  • 5
    @Lundin A 1 bit twos compliment number only has two possible values. If the bit is set, then since it is the sign bit, it is -1. If it isn't set then it is "positive" 0. I know this is implementation defined, I'm just explaining the results using the most common implantation – NathanOliver Dec 19 '18 at 15:00
  • 1
    The key here is rather that 2's complement or any other signed form cannot function with a single bit available. – Lundin Dec 19 '18 at 15:03
  • 1
    @JohnBollinger I understand that. That's why I have the discliamer that this is implementation defined. At least for the big 3 they all treat int as signed in this case. It is a shame that bit-fields are so under specified. It's basically here is this feature, consult your compiler on how to use it. – NathanOliver Dec 19 '18 at 15:08
  • 1
    @Lundin, the standard's wording for the representation of signed integers can perfectly well handle the case where there are zero value bits, at least in two of the three allowed alternatives. This works because it assigns (negative) place values to sign bits, rather than giving them an algorithmic interpretation. – John Bollinger Dec 19 '18 at 15:08
10

You could think of it as that in the 2's complement system, the left-most bit is the sign bit. Any signed integer with the left-most bit set is thus a negative value.

If you have a 1-bit signed integer, it has only the sign bit. So assigning 1 to that single bit can only set the sign bit. So, when reading it back, the value is interpreted as negative and so is -1.

The values a 1 bit signed integer can hold is -2^(n-1)= -2^(1-1)= -2^0= -1 and 2^n-1= 2^1-1=0

8

As per the C++ standard n4713, a very similar code snippet is provided. The type used is BOOL (custom), but it can apply to any type.

12.2.4

4 If the value true or false is stored into a bit-field of type bool of any size (including a one bit bit-field), the original bool value and the value of the bit-field shall compare equal. If the value of an enumerator is stored into a bit-field of the same enumeration type and the number of bits in the bit-field is large enough to hold all the values of that enumeration type (10.2), the original enumerator value and the value of the bit-field shall compare equal. [ Example:

enum BOOL { FALSE=0, TRUE=1 };
struct A {
  BOOL b:1;
};
A a;
void f() {
  a.b = TRUE;
  if (a.b == TRUE)    // yields true
    { /* ... */ }
}

— end example ]


At 1st glance, the bold part appears open for interpretation. However, the correct intent becomes clear when the enum BOOL is derived from the int.

enum BOOL : int { FALSE=0, TRUE=1 }; // ***this line
struct mystruct { BOOL enabled:1; };
int main()
{
  struct mystruct s;
  s.enabled = TRUE;
  if(s.enabled == TRUE)
    printf("Is enabled\n"); // --> we think this to be printed
  else
    printf("Is disabled !!\n");
}

With above code it gives a warning without -Wall -pedantic:

warning: ‘mystruct::enabled’ is too small to hold all values of ‘enum BOOL’ struct mystruct { BOOL enabled:1; };

The output is:

Is disabled !! (when using enum BOOL : int)

If enum BOOL : int is made simple enum BOOL, then the output is as the above standard pasage specifies:

Is enabled (when using enum BOOL)


Hence, it can be concluded, also as few other answers have, that int type is not big enough to store value "1" in just a single bit bit-field.

0

There is nothing wrong with your understanding of bitfields that I can see. What I see is that you redefined mystruct first as struct mystruct { int enabled:1; } and then as struct mystruct s;. What you should have coded was:

#include <stdio.h>

struct mystruct { int enabled:1; };
int main()
{
    mystruct s; <-- Get rid of "struct" type declaration
    s.enabled = 1;
    if(s.enabled == 1)
        printf("Is enabled\n"); // --> we think this to be printed
    else
        printf("Is disabled !!\n");
}

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