16

The R language definition (for version 3.5.1) states

The expression x[] returns x, but drops “irrelevant” attributes from the result. Only names and in multi-dimensional arrays dim and dimnames attributes are retained.

But consider the following example:

v <- factor(c(dog = 1, cat = 3))
attr(v, "label") <- "feeling confused"
attributes(v)
# $`names`
# [1] "dog" "cat"
# 
# $levels
# [1] "1" "3"
# 
# $class
# [1] "factor"
# 
# $label
# [1] "feeling confused"
attributes(v[])
# $`names`
# [1] "dog" "cat"
# 
# $levels
# [1] "1" "3"
# 
# $label
# [1] "feeling confused"
# 
# $class
# [1] "factor"

Attribute order is changed but all the attributes are retained.

all.equal(attributes(v)[c(1,2,4,3)], attributes(v[]))
# [1] TRUE

Why is my example exempt? Or what am I missing?

  • 1
    Can you provide a counter example where the "irrelevant attributes" are dropped? – Mako212 Dec 19 '18 at 17:24
  • @Mako212 No, actually I can't. But haven't searched much. – sindri_baldur Dec 19 '18 at 17:25
  • I'm not sure what that example would be either, but I don't think we can consider the attributes of v to be irrelevant. Maybe this is related to S3/S4 class attributes? – Mako212 Dec 19 '18 at 17:29
  • 1
    Something related to ponder: stackoverflow.com/q/41191623/324364 – joran Dec 19 '18 at 17:31
  • 3
    Found something relevant in stat.ethz.ch/pipermail/r-help/2015-December/434647.html, there it stated that the R language definition lies. – sindri_baldur Dec 19 '18 at 17:45
12
+100

I think it may simply be mis-documented in the current R language definition document.

As you've found, the behaviour is opposite to what is described. Note that, in your example, if you subset using v[1:length(v)], you get the behaviour you expected from v[]. So the empty [] is the exception that returns the attributes unchanged.

Looking for the answer I found an illustrative commit/comment (see diffs here: https://github.com/wch/r-source/commit/6b3480e05e9671a517d70c80b9f3aac53b6afd9d#diff-3347e77b1c102d875a744a2cd7fa86e5) The author describes the behaviour that you have observed:

Subsetting (other than by an empty index) generally drops all attributes except @code{names}, @code{dim} and @code{dimnames} which are reset as appropriate. On the other hand, subassignment generally preserves attributes even if the length is changed. Coercion drops all attributes.

I think if the subset [] is empty, the object that is returned is simply a copy of the original object.

EDIT (from comments below):

The reason that the attributes of v and v[] appear in a different order, is likely because of the way the attributes are assigned to the new subset in this special case of subsetting with an empty index. Further, the different order shouldn't be considered a bug, because attributes are not supposed to have an order (see help(attributes). Note that in help(``[``), the behaviour you observed is accurately described (unlike in language definition you referenced), and explains why one would want this behaviour:

An empty index selects all values: this is most often used to replace all > the entries but keep the ‘attributes’."

  • v[1:length(v)] preserves class and levels attribute though. My example suggests it is not simply a copy because the attribute order changes. – sindri_baldur Dec 28 '18 at 7:48
  • 6
    I think this is likely because of the way the attributes are assigned to the new subset in this special case of subsetting with an empty index. Further, it shouldn't be considered a bug, because attributes are not supposed to have an order (see help(attributes). Note that in help(``[``), the behaviour you observed is accurately described, and explains why one would want this behaviour. "An empty index selects all values: this is most often used to replace all the entries but keep the ‘attributes’." – E. Brown Dec 28 '18 at 16:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.