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Hi recently I encountered a subtle issue while trying to build a Trie function:

def search(self, word):
    def dfs(node, word):
        if not word:
            if node.end:
                self.res = True
            return
        if word[0]!='.':
            node = node.next.get(word[0])
            if not node:
                return
            dfs(node, word[1:])
        else:
            for n in node.next.values():
                dfs(n, word[1:])

    curr = self.root
    self.res = False
    dfs(curr, word)
    return self.res

This works.

But this doesn't:

def search(self, word):
    def dfs(node, word, res):
        if not word:
            if node.end:
                res = True
            return
        if word[0]!='.':
            node = node.next.get(word[0])
            if not node:
                return
            dfs(node, word[1:], res)
        else:
            for n in node.next.values():
                dfs(n, word[1:], res)

    curr = self.root
    res = False
    dfs(curr, word, res)
    return res

I don't get it why the latter approach, which passes a variable along the recursion instead of using a global variable, does not work.

  • 1
    Because assigning to a parameter doesn't change the variable at the call site. Though you don't need a "global" in either case, as dfs is a nested function – UnholySheep Dec 19 '18 at 18:21
  • What is the error traceback you are getting on the latter? – SRT HellKitty Dec 19 '18 at 18:27
  • because the value of res changes during each recursive call and is not stored anywhare, unlike self.res. You can make the second example work correctly byassigning the res to some global state – Nikos M. Dec 19 '18 at 19:03
1

The issue has to do with the way objects are handled and passed to functions in Python. Inside the function res is a new variable, initialized to the object the function was called with. But assigning res = True inside the function just means res now names a different object. It doesn't change the object in the callers scope. As a simple example imagine this code:

def Test(result):
  if (something):
     result = True

Test(False) 

#what would I check to see if result changed?
#is the global False constant now equal to True?

I can see a few ways around your problem.

  1. Return res from the function. res = dfs(n, word, res)

  2. Pass an array, whose contents can be modified inside a function. res = [True] would make res name a different array, but res[0] = True changes a value inside the original array.

Like this.

res = [False]
dfs(n, word, res)
...
return res[0] 

3- Use the nonlocal keyword to use a variable in a higher scope:

def search(self, word):
    res = False
    def dfs(node, word):
        nonlocal res #this is the same object as the `res` in `search`
        if not word:
            if node.end:
                res = True #this will modify `res` as intended
        ... #rest of dfs function

    dfs(self.root, word)
    return res
| improve this answer | |
  • see stackoverflow.com/q/52548178/10396 and related questions to understand pass-by-value vs. pass-by-reference. – AShelly Dec 19 '18 at 18:33
  • 2
    Everything in Python is passed by value. The issue is whether you try to mutate the object referenced by that value (where mutation is distinct from simple assignment to a name.) – chepner Dec 19 '18 at 18:34
  • Since dfs is a nested function in OPs code you should also mention the option of using nonlocal res – UnholySheep Dec 19 '18 at 18:34
  • TIL about nonlocal. Thanks. – AShelly Dec 19 '18 at 19:04

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