3

For a Risk-like game I have a struct for each region, each of which need to have a list of associated regions that troops can move into from the mother region.

In theory, it would look like

typedef struct {
    char* name;
    region_t* connections;
} region_t;

However, this is of course impossible due to the fact that region_t doesn't exist before the parser reaches the type region_t*. Therefore I have opted to use void* in place of region_t*.

typedef struct {
    char* name;
    void* connections;
} region_t;

MiddleEast.connections = malloc(6 * sizeof(void*));
MiddleEast.connections = &SouthernEurope;
MiddleEast.(connections + 1) = &Egypt;

Using the region_ts MiddleEast, SouthernEurope, and Egypt, I can set the first connection to Southern Europe successfully, but when I try to set .(connections + 1) to &Egypt I get the compiler error

error: expected identifier before ‘(’ token

How do I properly access the next memory address?

4
  • 2
    No, you can. typedef struct region{ char* name; struct region* connections; } region_t;//did you hear about linked lists? – purec Dec 20 '18 at 11:04
  • @purec oh that's right. I've been so wrapped up in typedefs that I forgot structs can also have names :-) – Stegosaurus Dec 20 '18 at 11:12
  • Regarding MiddleEast.(connections + 1) = &Egypt;, the correct syntax for this is MiddleEast.connections + 1 = &Egypt;, but this again will not work as intended. The working code would be MiddleEast.connections + sizeof(region_t) = &Egypt; (because it was declared void * and the increment does not work automatically with sizeof). Just for the sake of memory arithmetic :) – Vlad Rusu Dec 20 '18 at 11:26
  • Indeed something along *(region_t*)(void*)((uintptr_t)MiddleEast.connections + sizeof(region_t)) = &Egypt would work, but is just pain in this case. – KamilCuk Dec 20 '18 at 11:32
6

The solution is not void *, it's properly using structs.

structs with a name can be referenced inside themselves. The type doesn't exist, but the named struct does, so you can write:

typedef struct region{
    char* name;
    struct region* connections;
} region_t;
1
  • 1
    It is not correct to say “The type doesn’t exist.” Once struct identifier has appeared in the code, struct identifier is known to the compiler as an incomplete type. – Eric Postpischil Dec 20 '18 at 13:55
1

You want to create an array of void pointers, not an array of voids. You want to iterate over void pointers.

typedef struct {
    char* name;
    void **connections;
} region_t;

MiddleEast.connections = malloc(6 * sizeof(void*));
MiddleEast.connections[0] = &SouthernEurope;
MiddleEast.connections[1] = &Egypt;
free(MiddleEast.connections);

is of course impossible due to the fact that region_t doesn't exist before the parser reaches the type region_t*.

You can't forward declare a typedef, but you can do that with structure.

typedef struct region_s {
   char *name;
   struct region_s *connections;
} region_t;

Forward declaration is common in C code in constructing linked lists and similar. The sizeof(struct region_s *) is known, the struct region_s pointer size is known before the struct region_s is defined, so you can:

// forward declaration
struct region_s;
// pointer is ok
struct region_s *regionpointer;
// we can define the structure after using a pointer
struct region_s {
    // you can even point to yourself
    struct region_s *regionpointer;
};
// typedef separated for readbility
typedef struct region_s region_t;

error: expected identifier before ‘(’ token

MiddleEast.(connections + 1) = &Egypt;

The . is member operator; it gets the member of a structure. The string after . is taken as a symbol. As you can see, there is no member inside MiddleEast structure named (connections (exactly, using space as separator), as such name is disallowed. You want:

MiddleEast.connections + 1 = &Egypt;

Which will still not work, as the left side of = is the value of the pointer inside MiddleEast.connections array. You can't assign this value; it is a result of an addition. (the same you can't int a; a + 5 = 43;). What you want is to assign the value of the second element inside MiddleEast.connections array to the value of &Egypt. So you need to deference the pointer value.

*(MiddleEast.connections + 1) = &Egypt;

Or shorter and way more readable, as a[b] is equal to *(a + b):

MiddleEast.connections[1] = &Egypt;

Jokingly: Please never:

1[MiddleEast.connections] = &Egypt;

The MiddleEast.connections is an "integral"/whole/standalone part, that you can't separate.

Note that doing:

MiddleEast.connections = malloc(6 * sizeof(void*));
MiddleEast.connections = &SouthernEurope;

just leaks memory, as you can't no longer free(MiddleEast.connections) free the memory.

4
  • note that MiddleEast.connections + 1 causes error: lvalue required as left operand of assignment – Stegosaurus Dec 20 '18 at 11:23
  • @KamilCuk You are able to free(MiddleEast.connections) (if declared on heap). But indeed it doesn't free what you allocated before, so yes, there is definitely a memory leak. – Vlad Rusu Dec 20 '18 at 11:31
  • @VladRusu can you explain why free(MiddleEast.connections) doesn't free the allocated data? – Stegosaurus Dec 20 '18 at 12:19
  • @Stegosaurus You first assigned MiddleEast.connections = malloc(6 * sizeof(void*));. Which means that now MiddleEast.connections points to the newly allocated memory. Now if you make MiddleEast.connections = &SouthernEurope; you lose the reference to the allocated memory. When you call free afterwards, you won't free what you allocated before, but you will free the memory where &SouthernEurope points to. – Vlad Rusu Dec 21 '18 at 15:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.