2

I have a type for logging levels:

type LoggingLevel =
| Trace
| Debug
| Info

I would like to say that some logging levels are higher than others. For example, Trace is higher than Info.

So I implemented IComparable like this:

[<StructuralEqualityAttribute>]
[<CustomComparisonAttribute>]
type LoggingLevel =
| Trace
| Debug
| Info

  interface IComparable<LoggingLevel> with
    override this.CompareTo other =
      let score x =
        match x with
        | Trace -> 0
        | Debug -> 1
        | Info -> 2
      (score this) - (score other)

But when I try to use it, I get an error:

if a >= b 
then 
  // ...

The type 'LoggingLevel' does not support the 'comparison' constraint. For example, it does not support the 'System.IComparable' interface

How have I gone wrong here?


I managed to get it working, but now the type definition is so verbose! There must be a better way...

[<CustomEquality>]
[<CustomComparisonAttribute>]
type LoggingLevel =
  | Trace
  | Debug
  | Info

  override this.Equals (obj) =
    match obj with
    | :? LoggingLevel as other ->
      match (this, other) with
      | (Trace, Trace) -> true
      | (Debug, Debug) -> true
      | (Info, Info) -> true
      | _ -> false
    | _ -> false

  override this.GetHashCode () =
    match this with
    | Trace -> 0
    | Debug -> 1
    | Info -> 2

  interface IComparable<LoggingLevel> with
    member this.CompareTo (other : LoggingLevel) =
      let score x =
        match x with
        | Trace -> 0
        | Debug -> 1
        | Info -> 2
      (score this) - (score other)

  interface IComparable with
    override this.CompareTo other =
      (this :> IComparable<LoggingLevel>).CompareTo (other :?> LoggingLevel)
  • 1
    Can you hover over the definition of your LoggingLevel to verify that it indeed has registered the method and it is returning an Int32? – pim Dec 20 '18 at 11:26
  • If I hover over (using Ionide) I do not see a mention of IComparable – sdgfsdh Dec 20 '18 at 11:33
  • this.CompareTo is LoggingLevel -> int – sdgfsdh Dec 20 '18 at 11:35
  • I think it is complaining about IComparable the non-generic interface here. Try adding: interface IComparable with override this.CompareTo other = (this :?> IComparable<LoggingLevel>).CompareTo other – dumetrulo Dec 20 '18 at 12:01
  • 1
    I'm not sure, but I don't think you actually need to implement anything to get Discriminated Union comparisons. I say this based on Tomas P's answer to this question I asked. – Jarak Dec 20 '18 at 23:18
1

I would like to say that some logging levels are higher than others. For example, Trace is higher than Info.

Do you need to use custom equality and custom comparison at all? F# has these built in for Discriminated Unions. You just need to write them in increasing order in the type definition:

type LoggingLevel =
  | Info
  | Debug
  | Trace // Note the order here! 🤔

Trace > Info // true

let levels = [ Trace; Debug; Info; Trace; Debug; Info ]

levels |> List.sort
// [Info; Info; Debug; Debug; Trace; Trace]
// Comparison ✔

levels |> List.countBy id
// [(Trace, 2); (Debug, 2); (Info, 2)]
// Equality ✔

More info: https://stackoverflow.com/a/52220335/1256041

  • 1
    That is... so much better. I was not aware that comparisons were implemented for DUs automatically. – sdgfsdh Dec 21 '18 at 10:53
  • 1
    @sdgfsdh Frankly, the free equality should be expected. I think object reference equality (e.g. in normal classes) is a really bad default. The free comparison though, is a nice bonus in general, and essential in F# where set items and map keys have to be comparable because of how those immutable data structures are implemented. – TheQuickBrownFox Dec 21 '18 at 14:10
1

I think you're comparison implementation is off here based on the typing. The following compiles for me:

[<CustomComparison>]
[<StructuralEquality>]
type LoggingLevel =
| Trace
| Debug
| Info

    interface System.IComparable with 
        member this.CompareTo other = 
            0
            // replace 0 with your comparison logic here

let a = Trace
let b = Debug

if Trace > Debug then printfn "here"

Note that other in this case will be of type obj and you'll need to box accordingly. Made all the trickier by the fact that all cases here are empty (i.e. lacking type)

I would be curious to see a more complete example, of you attempting to use this logic. I suspect a match expression might be better and allow you to remove this custom comparison.

That said, without knowing your exact use case, wouldn't something like this be more functional (and perhaps) simpler?

type LoggingLevel = Trace | Debug | Info

module Logger =        
    let doSomeLogging logLevel =
        match logLevel with
        | Trace -> "trace"
        | Debug -> "debug"
        | Info -> "info"

let result = Logger.doSomeLogging Trace
  • I think this solution requires you to implement Equals and GetHashCode. – sdgfsdh Dec 20 '18 at 12:29
  • It's not required. But you will get a compiler warning. – pim Dec 20 '18 at 12:31
  • Isn't the warning there for a reason though? – sdgfsdh Dec 20 '18 at 14:24
  • Yes. It's generally good not to ignore them. But in this case it isn't affecting your issue. – pim Dec 20 '18 at 14:37

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