76

What is the most efficient way to iterate through all DOM elements in Java?

Something like this but for every single DOM elements on current org.w3c.dom.Document?

for(Node childNode = node.getFirstChild(); childNode!=null;){
    Node nextChild = childNode.getNextSibling();
    // Do something with childNode, including move or delete...
    childNode = nextChild;
}
2
  • Recursive invocation of Node.getChildNodes? download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/org/w3c/dom/… Mar 22 '11 at 5:38
  • I think it's interesting that the question asked the most efficient method to iterate over all elements of a Document, but none of the answers did any tests of efficiency, and the only mention of efficiency was "I think" or similar surmises. Mar 14 '20 at 20:21
132

Basically you have two ways to iterate over all elements:

1. Using recursion (the most common way I think):

public static void main(String[] args) throws SAXException, IOException,
        ParserConfigurationException, TransformerException {

    DocumentBuilderFactory docBuilderFactory = DocumentBuilderFactory
        .newInstance();
    DocumentBuilder docBuilder = docBuilderFactory.newDocumentBuilder();
    Document document = docBuilder.parse(new File("document.xml"));
    doSomething(document.getDocumentElement());
}

public static void doSomething(Node node) {
    // do something with the current node instead of System.out
    System.out.println(node.getNodeName());

    NodeList nodeList = node.getChildNodes();
    for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.getLength(); i++) {
        Node currentNode = nodeList.item(i);
        if (currentNode.getNodeType() == Node.ELEMENT_NODE) {
            //calls this method for all the children which is Element
            doSomething(currentNode);
        }
    }
}

2. Avoiding recursion using getElementsByTagName() method with * as parameter:

public static void main(String[] args) throws SAXException, IOException,
        ParserConfigurationException, TransformerException {

    DocumentBuilderFactory docBuilderFactory = DocumentBuilderFactory
            .newInstance();
    DocumentBuilder docBuilder = docBuilderFactory.newDocumentBuilder();
    Document document = docBuilder.parse(new File("document.xml"));

    NodeList nodeList = document.getElementsByTagName("*");
    for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.getLength(); i++) {
        Node node = nodeList.item(i);
        if (node.getNodeType() == Node.ELEMENT_NODE) {
            // do something with the current element
            System.out.println(node.getNodeName());
        }
    }
}

I think these ways are both efficient.
Hope this helps.

5
  • 11
    Passing the iteration index as an argument to the recursive function, you can made it tail-recursive, which is optimized by compiler, to avoid stack overflow.
    – khachik
    Apr 3 '11 at 18:30
  • 131
    I think it's too late to avoid stack overflow. You're already here.
    – braden
    Sep 28 '12 at 17:19
  • 1
    What makes you think that the creation of a node list for the whole document is efficient? This means almost copying the whole document. Or is there some kind of delayed evaluation hidden in NodeList optimizing sequential calls to item?
    – ceving
    Mar 7 '13 at 18:17
  • 1
    @ceving NodeList is an interface. Implementations are free to do advanced things. The item(n) implementation in org.apache.xerces.dom.ParentNode includes a cache but it is used to speed up the lookup, not to save memory.
    – Ryan
    Aug 20 '14 at 18:32
  • 1
    Go with answer #2 but change the for loop to read: for (int i = 0, len = nodeList.getLength(); i < len; i++)
    – Andrew
    May 24 '18 at 5:39
37

for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.getLength(); i++)

change to

for (int i = 0, len = nodeList.getLength(); i < len; i++)

to be more efficient.

The second way of javanna answer may be the best as it tends to use a flatter, predictable memory model.

2
  • 1
    You need at least 50 rep score to comment. I had the same problem and answered because I couldn't comment. Have some upvote-aid ;)
    – nyaray
    Jul 11 '13 at 16:54
  • The avoiding recursion solution above prevents the program from using more stack memory based on the data. Each step in recursion pushes more data into the stack.
    – Andrew
    Mar 30 '18 at 14:57
2

I also stumbled over this problem recently. Here is my solution. I wanted to avoid recursion, so I used a while loop.

Because of the adds and removes in arbitrary places on the list, I went with the LinkedList implementation.

/* traverses tree starting with given node */
  private static List<Node> traverse(Node n)
  {
    return traverse(Arrays.asList(n));
  }

  /* traverses tree starting with given nodes */
  private static List<Node> traverse(List<Node> nodes)
  {
    List<Node> open = new LinkedList<Node>(nodes);
    List<Node> visited = new LinkedList<Node>();

    ListIterator<Node> it = open.listIterator();
    while (it.hasNext() || it.hasPrevious())
    {
      Node unvisited;
      if (it.hasNext())
        unvisited = it.next();
      else
        unvisited = it.previous();

      it.remove();

      List<Node> children = getChildren(unvisited);
      for (Node child : children)
        it.add(child);

      visited.add(unvisited);
    }

    return visited;
  }

  private static List<Node> getChildren(Node n)
  {
    List<Node> children = asList(n.getChildNodes());
    Iterator<Node> it = children.iterator();
    while (it.hasNext())
      if (it.next().getNodeType() != Node.ELEMENT_NODE)
        it.remove();
    return children;
  }

  private static List<Node> asList(NodeList nodes)
  {
    List<Node> list = new ArrayList<Node>(nodes.getLength());
    for (int i = 0, l = nodes.getLength(); i < l; i++)
      list.add(nodes.item(i));
    return list;
  }

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