114

How do you convert a string into a list?

Say the string is like text = "a,b,c". After the conversion, text == ['a', 'b', 'c'] and hopefully text[0] == 'a', text[1] == 'b'?

  • 1
    hi I did this like that, list(stringObject.split(',')) – Günay Gültekin Dec 11 '17 at 11:58

12 Answers 12

178

Like this:

>>> text = 'a,b,c'
>>> text = text.split(',')
>>> text
[ 'a', 'b', 'c' ]

Alternatively, you can use eval() if you trust the string to be safe:

>>> text = 'a,b,c'
>>> text = eval('[' + text + ']')
  • Thank you! Such a life saver! – Clinteney Hui Mar 22 '11 at 5:31
  • @Clinteney: No problem ;-) You may also want to look into pickle if you're persisting objects to strings. – Cameron Mar 22 '11 at 5:33
  • 2
    This is not an array, it is a list, Arrays represent basic values and behave very much like lists, except the type of objects stored in them is constrained. – joaquin Mar 22 '11 at 6:32
  • 7
    Friendly reminder: Don't use eval, even if you trust the string to be safe. It's not worth the potential security hazard for anything more than personal scripts and fiddling in an interactive shell. – A. Wilson Jan 25 '13 at 20:19
  • 3
    eval('[' + text + ']') will treat a,b,c as variables, not string. – phaibin May 25 '16 at 2:30
148

Just to add on to the existing answers: hopefully, you'll encounter something more like this in the future:

>>> word = 'abc'
>>> L = list(word)
>>> L
['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> ''.join(L)
'abc'

But what you're dealing with right now, go with @Cameron's answer.

>>> word = 'a,b,c'
>>> L = word.split(',')
>>> L
['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> ','.join(L)
'a,b,c'
  • 4
    Although I agree with you that @Cameron's answer was the "right now" answer I think your thoroughness makes this the more correct answer. We are rarely given comma separated strings out in the real world and it's good to know how to convert to a list regardless of format. – TristanZimmerman May 19 '17 at 18:01
32

The following Python code will turn your string into a list of strings:

import ast
teststr = "['aaa','bbb','ccc']"
testarray = ast.literal_eval(teststr)
19

I don't think you need to

In python you seldom need to convert a string to a list, because strings and lists are very similar

Changing the type

If you really have a string which should be a character array, do this:

In [1]: x = "foobar"
In [2]: list(x)
Out[2]: ['f', 'o', 'o', 'b', 'a', 'r']

Not changing the type

Note that Strings are very much like lists in python

Strings have accessors, like lists

In [3]: x[0]
Out[3]: 'f'

Strings are iterable, like lists

In [4]: for i in range(len(x)):
...:     print x[i]
...:     
f
o
o
b
a
r

TLDR

Strings are lists. Almost.

7

If you actually want arrays:

>>> from array import array
>>> text = "a,b,c"
>>> text = text.replace(',', '')
>>> myarray = array('c', text)
>>> myarray
array('c', 'abc')
>>> myarray[0]
'a'
>>> myarray[1]
'b'

If you do not need arrays, and only want to look by index at your characters, remember a string is an iterable, just like a list except the fact that it is immutable:

>>> text = "a,b,c"
>>> text = text.replace(',', '')
>>> text[0]
'a'
  • 1
    Out of curiosity, after you did myarray = array('c', text), where did the "c" go? since if you type array, you got array("c","abc"), but a[0]==a? Thank you – Clinteney Hui Mar 22 '11 at 12:16
  • @Clinteney: The 'c' means "create an array of characters". See the docs for more info – Cameron Mar 22 '11 at 12:43
  • I've upvoted, but too early. I obtain array('c', '1 1 91 0.001 228') when calling a = array('c',e) where e = "1 1 91 0.001 228" – Valentin Heinitz Feb 24 '14 at 15:20
  • @ValentinHeinitz Yes, that is what you must get as shown in my example. What do you expect ? – joaquin Feb 24 '14 at 22:41
  • @joaquin: Ok, I got it. It's all right with the answer. I was confused by the question "text == [a,b,c]" should be "text == ['a','b','c']" – Valentin Heinitz Feb 25 '14 at 21:23
7

In case you want to split by spaces, you can just use .split():

a = 'mary had a little lamb'
z = a.split()
print z

Output:

['mary', 'had', 'a', 'little', 'lamb'] 
  • This outputs what is between the (), i.e. nothing at all. – Anthon Apr 12 '15 at 8:16
2
m = '[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]'

m= eval(m.split()[0])

[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
  • Please provide some additional information along with your code so that the original poster can better understand how this solves his problem. – Ivan Jun 7 '18 at 10:23
2

All answers are good, there is another way of doing, which is list comprehension, see the solution below.

u = "UUUDDD"

lst = [x for x in u]

for comma separated list do the following

u = "U,U,U,D,D,D"

lst = [x for x in u.split(',')]
1

I usually use:

l = [ word.strip() for word in text.split(',') ]

the strip remove spaces around words.

1

To convert a string having the form a="[[1, 3], [2, -6]]" I wrote yet not optimized code:

matrixAr = []
mystring = "[[1, 3], [2, -4], [19, -15]]"
b=mystring.replace("[[","").replace("]]","") # to remove head [[ and tail ]]
for line in b.split('], ['):
    row =list(map(int,line.split(','))) #map = to convert the number from string (some has also space ) to integer
    matrixAr.append(row)
print matrixAr
0
# to strip `,` and `.` from a string ->

>>> 'a,b,c.'.translate(None, ',.')
'abc'

You should use the built-in translate method for strings.

Type help('abc'.translate) at Python shell for more info.

0

Using functional Python:

text=filter(lambda x:x!=',',map(str,text))

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