43

I want to convert the array ['one', 'two', 'three', 'four'] into one, two, three and four

Note that the first items have a comma, and but there is the word and between the second-last one and the last one.

The best solution I've come up with:

a.reduce( (res, v, i) => i === a.length - 2 ? res + v + ' and ' : res + v + ( i == a.length -1? '' : ', '), '' )

It's based on adding the commas at the end -- with the exception of the second-last one (a.length - 2) and with a way to avoid the last comma (a.length - 2).

SURELY there must be a better, neater, more intelligent way to do this?

It's a difficult topic to search on search engines because it contains the word "and"...

8
  • 21
    SURELY you value the serial/Oxford comma?!?
    – Argalatyr
    Dec 21, 2018 at 5:35
  • 2
    You mean I should return one, two, three, and four?
    – Merc
    Dec 21, 2018 at 5:48
  • @Merc: Indeed, that's how it looks with the Oxford comma. Currently, there are two schools: some people prefer the Oxford comma, while others prefer not to use it. Although I personally always use the Oxford comma, IIRC, Oxford itself has stopped advocating it. Dec 21, 2018 at 12:19
  • There is something very Oxford about now referring to "The So Recently Oxford Comma".
    – user1531971
    Dec 21, 2018 at 15:46
  • @AndreasRejbrand reference on disuse by Oxford Press? I haven't seen that, and it makes little sense to me. The serial comma seems always clearer, and the challenge of specifying the alternative (e.g. question above) illustrates the consistency of the serial comma.
    – Argalatyr
    Dec 23, 2018 at 12:35

9 Answers 9

51

One option would be to pop the last item, then join all the rest by commas, and concatenate with and plus the last item:

const input = ['one', 'two', 'three', 'four'];
const last = input.pop();
const result = input.join(', ') + ' and ' + last;
console.log(result);

If you can't mutate the input array, use slice instead, and if there might only be one item in the input array, check the length of the array first:

function makeString(arr) {
  if (arr.length === 1) return arr[0];
  const firsts = arr.slice(0, arr.length - 1);
  const last = arr[arr.length - 1];
  return firsts.join(', ') + ' and ' + last;
}

console.log(makeString(['one', 'two', 'three', 'four']));
console.log(makeString(['one']));

6
  • 1
    Might have to be some guards on lengths, and it's the same-same approach I'd probably recommend. Dec 21, 2018 at 4:22
  • 1
    I love this, and it's just so simple -- especially simple to read (I am a great fan of code maintenance)
    – Merc
    Dec 21, 2018 at 4:25
  • I think this is hard to beat, but I am waiting a little before accepting in case it attracts even better answers. But, I love it
    – Merc
    Dec 21, 2018 at 4:26
  • 8
    Very nice, thought the lack of the Oxford comma is killing me.
    – Mark
    Dec 21, 2018 at 4:43
  • As an echo to an other answer, you may want to push last back in input (you know, "modifying the inputs when it's not the output is bad" and stuff like that...)
    – Kaiido
    Dec 21, 2018 at 4:53
27

Starting in V8 v7.2 and Chrome 72, you can use the sweet Intl.ListFormat API. It will also take care of localizing your list when requested, which might be of great help if you need it.

const lf = new Intl.ListFormat('en');

console.log(lf.format(['Frank']));
// → 'Frank'

console.log(lf.format(['Frank', 'Christine']));
// → 'Frank and Christine'

console.log(lf.format(['Frank', 'Christine', 'Flora']));
// → 'Frank, Christine, and Flora'

console.log(lf.format(['Frank', 'Christine', 'Flora', 'Harrison']));
// → 'Frank, Christine, Flora, and Harrison'

// You can use it with other locales
const frlf = new Intl.ListFormat('fr');

console.log(frlf.format(['Frank', 'Christine', 'Flora', 'Harrison']));
// → 'Frank, Christine, Flora et Harrison'

You can even specify options to make it a disruption and use "or" instead of "and", or to format units such as "3 ft, 7 in".

It's not very widely supported as of writing, so you might not want to use it everywhere.

References
The Intl.ListFormat API - Google Developers
V8 release v7.2

17

I like Mark Meyer's approach as it doesn't alter the input. Here's my spin:

const makeCommaSeparatedString = (arr, useOxfordComma) => {
  const listStart = arr.slice(0, -1).join(', ')
  const listEnd = arr.slice(-1)
  const conjunction = arr.length <= 1 
    ? '' 
    : useOxfordComma && arr.length > 2 
      ? ', and ' 
      : ' and '

  return [listStart, listEnd].join(conjunction)
}

console.log(makeCommaSeparatedString(['one', 'two', 'three', 'four']))
// one, two, three and four

console.log(makeCommaSeparatedString(['one', 'two', 'three', 'four'], true))
// one, two, three, and four

console.log(makeCommaSeparatedString(['one', 'two'], true))
// one and two

console.log(makeCommaSeparatedString(['one']))
// one

console.log(makeCommaSeparatedString([]))
//

12

You can use Array.prototype.slice() when array.length is bigger than 1 and exclude the rest of the cases:

const result = a => a.length > 1 
  ? `${a.slice(0, -1).join(', ')} and ${a.slice(-1)}` 
  : {0: '', 1: a[0]}[a.length];

Code example:

const input1 = ['one', 'two', 'three', 'four'];
const input2 = ['A Tale of Two Cities', 'Harry Potter and the smth', 'One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish'];
const input3 = ['one', 'two'];
const input4 = ['one'];
const input5 = [];

const result = a => a.length > 1 
  ? `${a.slice(0, -1).join(', ')} and ${a.slice(-1)}` 
  : {0: '', 1: a[0]}[a.length];

console.log(result(input1));
console.log(result(input2));
console.log(result(input3));
console.log(result(input4));
console.log(result(input5));

2
  • 1
    Easy to introduce subtle issues that'll be found later (outside of a restricted set of input): ['A Tale of Two Cities', 'Harry Potter and the smth', 'One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish'] Dec 21, 2018 at 4:23
  • 1
    I like this solution a lot. However, if input only has ONE value = 'VALUE', it returns 'and VALUE'
    – Merc
    Dec 21, 2018 at 5:55
9

Using Array#reduce:

['one', 'two', 'three', 'four'].reduce( (a, b, i, array) => a + (i < array.length - 1 ? ', ' : ' and ') + b)

3
  • 1
    Easily the winner. The fact that this answer is so far down today speaks to this community's flabbergasting resistance to the new arrow functions, which, as someone who dove into js relatively recently, I am amazed by. Do we want one single expression to do exactly what was asked, or three lines of code? How about a five-line function that we can call? Yikes people!
    – Zack
    Feb 12, 2019 at 22:53
  • 1
    And for the next dev: heresHowToHandleOxfords.reduce( (a, b, i, array) => a + ( i < array.length - 1 ? ', ' : (array.length > 2 ? ', and ', ' and ') ) + b)
    – Zack
    Feb 12, 2019 at 23:03
  • 3
    @Zack Your ternary is missing a colon. It should be heresHowToHandleOxfords.reduce( (a, b, i, array) => a + ( i < array.length - 1 ? ', ' : (array.length > 2 ? ', and ' : ' and ') ) + b). Thanks for your solution! Jun 22, 2021 at 5:32
4

Another approach could be using the splice method to remove the last two elements of the array and join they using the and token. After this, you could push this result again on the array, and finally join all elements using the , separator.


Updated to:

1) Show how this works for multiple cases (no extra control needed over the array length).

2) Wrap the logic inside a method.

3) Do not mutate the original array (if not required).

let arrayToCustomStr = (arr, enableMutate) =>
{
    // Clone the received array (if required).
    let a = enableMutate ? arr : arr.slice(0);

    // Convert the array to custom string.
    let removed = a.splice(-2, 2);
    a.push(removed.join(" and "));
    return a.join(", ");
}

// First example, mutate of original array is disabled.
let input1 = ['one', 'two', 'three', 'four'];
console.log("Result for input1:" , arrayToCustomStr(input1));
console.log("Original input1:", input1);

// Second example, mutate of original array is enabled.
let input2 = ['one', 'two'];
console.log("Result for input2:", arrayToCustomStr(input2, true));
console.log("Original input2:", input2);

// Third example, lenght of array is 1.
let input3 = ['one'];
console.log("Result for input3:", arrayToCustomStr(input3));

// Fourth example, empty array.
let input4 = [];
console.log("Result for input4:", arrayToCustomStr(input4));

// Plus example.
let bob = [
    "Don't worry about a thing",
    "Cause every little thing",
    "Gonna be all right",
    "Saying, don't worry about a thing..."
];
console.log("Result for bob:", arrayToCustomStr(bob));
.as-console-wrapper {
    top: 0px;
    max-height: 100% !important;
}

4

Intl.ListFormat is exactly what you want. Although only Chrome 72+ and Opera 60+ are supported in May, 2019, a polyfill is available for other browsers: https://github.com/zbraniecki/IntlListFormat

const list = ['A', 'B', 'C', 'D'];

// With Oxford comma 
const lfOxfordComma = new Intl.ListFormat('en', {
  style: 'long',
  type: 'conjunction'
});
console.log(lfOxfordComma.format(list)); // → A, B, C, and D


// Without Oxford comma 
const lfComma = new Intl.ListFormat('en-GB', {
  style: 'long',
  type: 'conjunction'
});
console.log(lfComma.format(list)); // → A, B, C and D

1
  • This is seriously nice. Like, seriously.
    – Merc
    Jun 8, 2021 at 23:54
0

An easy way is also to insert and before the last word or quoted string using regex. Answer here on stack overflow

0

Here's a one-line option that is similar to Yosvel Quintero Arguelles's answer but provides an Oxford comma when there are three or more items.

let resultA4 = (list => list.length < 3 ? list.join(" and ") : [list.pop(), list.join(", ")].reverse().join(", and ")).call(this, ['one', 'two', 'three', 'four']);

let resultA2 = (list => list.length < 3 ? list.join(" and ") : [list.pop(), list.join(", ")].reverse().join(", and ")).call(this, ['one', 'two']);

let resultA1 = (list => list.length < 3 ? list.join(" and ") : [list.pop(), list.join(", ")].reverse().join(", and ")).call(this, ['one']);

let items = ['one', 'two', 'three', 'four'];

//If you can't mutate the list you can do this
let resultB = (list => list.length < 3 ? list.join(" and ") : [list.pop(), list.join(", ")].reverse().join(", and ")).call(this, items.slice());

// or this option that doesn't use call
let resultC = items.length < 3 ? items.join(" and ") : [items.slice(0, -1).join(", "), items.slice(-1)].join(", and ");

console.log(resultA4);
console.log(resultA2);
console.log(resultA1);
console.log(resultB);
console.log(resultC);

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