2

I'm facing a strange problem:

I have a main starting with:

#include <stdlib.h>     /* this defines NULL */
#include <stdio.h>      /* ditto */
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <ctype.h>      /* ditto */
#include <unistd.h>     /* ditto */

#include <linux/input.h>

#include <string.h>     /* ditto */
#include <sys/ioctl.h>

#include "parse.h"

... but in the included file:

#define NULL ((void*)0)  /* I need this! */

struct parse_key {
    char *name;
    unsigned int value;
} keynames[] = {
    {"KEY_RESERVED", 0},
    {"KEY_ESC", 1},
    {"KEY_1", 2},
    {"KEY_2", 3},
    ...
    {"KEY_MAX", 0x2ff},
    {NULL, 0}
};

I need to redefine NULL, otherwise I get the error:" error: ‘NULL’ undeclared here (not in a function)".

Note: NULL is defined in main file; if I try to #define it I get: "warning: "NULL" redefined"

Fix is trivial, but I do not understand what's going on. Can someone shed a light?

  • 3
    It's generally a bad idea to define variables in header files - try fixing that instead. – iBug Dec 21 '18 at 14:23
  • 3
    ... but in the included file:...which one? – Sourav Ghosh Dec 21 '18 at 14:24
  • 3
    @ZioByte please edit your question and add a minimal reproducible example – Jabberwocky Dec 21 '18 at 14:41
  • 3
    If I take your code, exactly as shown, assuming that "the included file" is parse.h, and compile it, I get "warning: NULL redefined" on the first line of parse.h. If I remove the redefinition, and the ellipsis, I get no errors. That means the problem is with something you did not show us. Please do as Jabberwocky asks, and show us code that will demonstrate the problem when we try it for ourselves. It would be helpful if you could also eliminate the use of Linux-specific headers in your test program, but if you can't make that happen, that's useful information in itself. – zwol Dec 21 '18 at 14:43
  • 1
    "Can someone shed a light?" Somewhere code has #include "parse.h" without the prior #include <stdlib.h>, else code as posted is edited down too far and is not representative of the problem. Suggest posting the complete "parse.h". – chux Dec 21 '18 at 15:28
6

Do not redefine it.

Just include <stdlib.h> in your header files

Also do not define any functions and data in the header files. Just the types declarations, extern variables, function declarations and static inline functions if they are used in many C files.

5

Usually this issue happens when you don't include the necessary headers in the actual header file, but they get included before the header in certain compilation units.

I.e. you have your header file without the necessary #include:

// parse.h
#ifndef PARSE_H
#define PARSE_H

struct parse_key
{
    char *name;
    unsigned int value;
}

static inline void key_init(struct parse_key * pk)
{
    pk->name = NULL; // <-- you need it here
}

#endif // PARSE_H

And then you have two compilation units, but only one of them includes the appropriate header:

// something.c
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "parse.h"    // <-- preprocessor inserts this when NULL is already known


// something_else.c
#include "parse.h"    // <-- but in this case, it will not compile

The only reliable solution is to include all the necessary headers in the problematic header itself.

Since only .c files are compiled, your compiler won't care if you are missing includes in .h files, but IDEs like Visual Studio or Eclipse often show warning messages in these cases.

As a side note, this:

struct parse_key {
    char *name;
    unsigned int value;
} keynames[] = {
    {"KEY_RESERVED", 0},
    {"KEY_ESC", 1},
    {"KEY_1", 2},
    {"KEY_2", 3},
    ...
    {"KEY_MAX", 0x2ff},
    {NULL, 0}
};

is a variable which will get created in each compilation unit that includes the header file. This means that you will probably also get linker errors telling you that you have duplicate variables.

0

I agree with the previous answer, but to try to explain your problem :

if you #include stdlib.h then parse.h where NULL is (re)defined you have the redefinition because NULL is already defined in stdlib

if in an other file you #include parse.h but not stdlib.h you need to define NULL in parse.h else it is not defined

if you really want to use NULL in parse.h you need to #include stdlib inside, but for me the best way is to not use NULL

0

Macro redefinition is incorrect here. NULL is a name reserved by these headers, and defining it before the inclusion of a header that defines it invokes undefined behaviour.

It is preferable to include the minimal needed headers in your own headers.

If NULL and types like size_t are all that you need, do include only <stddef.h>.

0

NULL is defined in the <stddef.h> library.

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