4

Maybe a quite easy question but I'm new in Linq to SQL. I have two tables

User : UserId,name,Password,Email
USER_TABLE: Id, UserId, FirstName,LastName......

I would like a query that gives for example: userID=3 then give all the details (FirstName,LastName etc) How can I join these two tables? I would prefer C# code if it is possible!

6

You do not have to do all the plumbing yourself. If you have the right foreign keys in the database you will not have to join yourself.

You can just do:

var query = from u in db.Users
select new { User = u;
FirstName = u.UserTables.FirstName }
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    If you go this route, do be careful that you have the plumbing you want in place - otherwise you may find that for a list of 100 users you might end up making 101 queries - 1 for the list of users and 100 for each FirstName in turn. – Stuart Mar 22 '11 at 10:31
  • @Stuart: you mean deferred loading but no, that is not true. If you use a select new {} like this it will do exactly one join. However, if you would do a foreach on User and then reference inside the foreach the UserTables you would get deferred loading (1+100). However, this can be controlled by using LoadOptions – Pleun Mar 22 '11 at 11:19
  • Yes - agreed - I was careful to say "might" and to say that you could avoid via "plumbing" - but i could have been clearer and more explicit - sorry. – Stuart Mar 22 '11 at 11:21
  • @Stuart: no problem... I just see a lot of people writing 'SQL with the Linq syntax' instead of really using Linq-2-sql the way I think it should be used. – Pleun Mar 22 '11 at 12:16
4

for an inner join use something like:

var query = from u in db.Users
            join ut in db.UserTables on u.UserId equals ut.UserId
            select new
            {
                User = u,
                Extra = ut
            };
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  • 1
    I don't want to use the UserId as a foreign key in the USER_TABLE. So I must use this way which you propose me? – dali1985 Mar 22 '11 at 10:49
  • If you don't want it as an FK (which is quite unusual!) then you can just use a from ut in db.UserTables where u.Userid == ut.Userid instead. – Stuart Mar 22 '11 at 10:52
2

Like this perhaps:

var joinedResult = from u in context.User
                   join u2 in context.UserTable on u.UserId equals u2.UserId
                   select new {
                      UserId = u.UserId,
                      FirstName = u2.FirstName
                   };

I guess your example is just an example, right? Cause it doesn't make much sense splitting that data into two tables.

| improve this answer | |
  • on your comment about splitting the data like this, I totally agree - but I also think it's actually pretty common - especially in ASP.Net membership code. – Stuart Mar 22 '11 at 9:21
  • And we all know that's a good example of software engineering :) – Mikael Östberg Mar 22 '11 at 9:22
2

It's possible to join tables using linq:

E.g :

var test = (from a in DataContext.User 
    join b in DataContext.UserTable on a.UserId equals b.UserId 
    select new 
    {                       
        UserId = a.UserId,
        FirstName = b.FirstName
        LastName = b.LastName
    }).ToList();

Regards

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