4

I've run into a big issue in my code.

TL;DR: After a few comments, I decided to post the entire code here:

https://repl.it/repls/AustereShinyBetatest

Here's my code:

def highlight_nonmodified(content: str) -> str:
    regex = re.compile(r'(?s)(\{.*?[^\}]+\})', re.I | re.S)
    replace = r'#\1'
    content = regex.sub(replace, content)
    return content


def get_line(string_t: str, original: str) -> int:
    original = original.splitlines(True)
    for (i, line) in enumerate(original, 1):
        if string_t[1:] in line:
            return i

    return -1


def highligh_merge(original: str, modified: str) -> str:
    for line in modified.splitlines(True):
        if line.startswith('#'):
            numer = get_line(line, original)
            error = r"#Tag not supported at line{0}\n".format(numer)
            error = error + line
            modified = modified.replace(line, error)

My issue is that here's what happens:

Textfile.txt (original):

1. Here goes some text. {tag} A wonderful day. It's soon cristmas. 
2. Happy 2019, soon. {Some useful tag!} Something else goes here. 
3. Happy ending. Yeppe! See you. 
4. 
5  Happy KKK! 
6. Happy B-Day!
7 
8. Universe is cool!
9.
10. {Tagish}. 
11.
12. {Slugish}. Here goes another line. {Slugish} since this is a new sentence. 
13.
14. endline.

Modified.txt:

Here goes some text.  A wonderful day. It's soon cristmas. 
Happy 2019, soon. #{Some useful tag!} Something else goes here. 
Happy ending. Yeppe! See you. 

Happy KKK! 
Happy B-Day!

Universe is cool!

. 

#Error: Tag not supported at line-1\n#{Slugish}. Here goes another line. #{Slugish} since this is a new sentence. 

endline. 

I cannot seem to get precise line numbering and comparing of lines, what am I doing wrong here, I am obviously, storing two copies, original and modified and then I pick then I try to pick out the line number from the original text by looping over line by line. But still without any success, is this even possible. Thanks a lot in advance!

8
  • 3
    Can you point out what goes "wrong" and "without success" in your modified file? Just stating it is wrong may be factually correct but it does not help us help you.
    – Jongware
    Dec 27, 2018 at 13:46
  • 1
    See original.txt and modified.txt for clarification.
    – John Smith
    Dec 27, 2018 at 14:00
  • 3
    I see they are different. But which differences are "wrong" and which ones are not?
    – Jongware
    Dec 27, 2018 at 14:03
  • 1
    I've manually added lines, so if some tag was not removed, I want to write out the line number it was on in the original.txt
    – John Smith
    Dec 27, 2018 at 14:06
  • 2
    It's not clear how the functions highlight_nonmodified and highligh_merge are used, or in what order; I would clarify your question to include a small driver, showing exactly how you take in some sample input, process it, and spit it out. It would also help to clarify that Modified.txt is the "wrong output", and End result is the "desired output". Dec 27, 2018 at 14:54

3 Answers 3

4
+100

I don't think this can be done if multi-line chunks of text may have been removed. However if you control the tagging process, you could include the original line number in the tag:

{ foo:12 }

and then recovering it is trivial

original = int(re.search(r'\d+', tag).group(0))

This modified version of your code:

import re                                                                                                                        


def annotate_tags(content: str) -> str:                                                                                          
    """Annotate tags with line numbers."""                                                                                       
    tag_pattern = re.compile(r'(\{(?P<tag_value>[^}]+)\})')                                                                      
    lines = content.splitlines(True)                                                                                             
    annotated_lines = []                                                                                                         
    for idx, line in enumerate(lines, 1):                                                                                        
        annotated_lines.append(tag_pattern.sub(r'{\g<tag_value>:%s}' % idx, line))                                               
    annotated = ''.join(annotated_lines)                                                                                         
    return annotated                                                                                                             


def modify(content: str) -> str:                                                                                                 
    supported_tags = {                                                                                                           
            re.compile(r'(\{tag:\d+\})'): r'',                                                                                   
            re.compile(r'(\{Tagish:\d+\})'): r''                                                                                 
    }                                                                                                                            

    for pattern, replace in supported_tags.items():                                                                              
        matches = pattern.findall(content)                                                                                       
        if matches:                                                                                                              
            content = pattern.sub(replace, content)                                                                              

    return content                                                                                                               


def highlight_nonmodified(content: str) -> str:                                                                                  
    regex = re.compile(r'(?s)(\{.*?[^\}]+\})', re.I | re.S)                                                                      
    replace = r'#\1'                                                                                                             
    content = regex.sub(replace, content)                                                                                        
    return content                                                                                                               


def get_line(string_t: str, original: str) -> int:                                                                               
    tag_pattern = re.compile(r'(\{[^}]+:(?P<line_no>\d+)\})')                                                                    
    match = tag_pattern.search(string_t)                                                                                         
    if match:                                                                                                                    
        return match.group('line_no')                                                                                            
    return -1                                                                                                                    


def highlight_merge(original: str, modified: str) -> str:                                                                        
    tag_regex = re.compile(r'#(?s)(\{.*?[^\}]+\})', re.I | re.S)                                                                 
    for line in modified.splitlines(True):                                                                                       
        if tag_regex.search(line):                                                                                               
            numer = get_line(line, original)                                                                                     
            error = "#Tag not supported at line{0}\n".format(numer)                                                              
            error = error + line
            modified = modified.replace(line, error)
    return modified


if __name__ == '__main__':
    file = 'textfile.txt'
    raw = ""
    with open(file, 'rt', encoding='utf-8') as f:
        for i, s in enumerate(f, 1):
            raw += "{}. {}".format(i, s)

    original = modified = raw

    modified = annotate_tags(modified)
    modified = modify(modified)
    modified = highlight_nonmodified(modified)
    modified = highlight_merge(original, modified)

    with open("modified.txt", 'w', encoding='utf-8') as f:
        f.write(modified)

Generates this output:

1. Here goes some text.  A wonderful day. It's soon cristmas. 
#Tag not supported at line2
2. Happy 2019, soon. #{Some useful tag!:2} Something else goes here. 
3. Happy ending. Yeppe! See you. 
4. 
#Tag not supported at line5
5. #{begin:5}
6. Happy KKK! 
7. Happy B-Day!
#Tag not supported at line8
8. #{end:8}
9. 
10. Universe is cool!
11. 
12. . 
13. 
#Tag not supported at line14
14. #{Slugish:14}. Here goes another line. #{Slugish:14} since this is a new sentence. 
15. 
16. endline.
7
  • 1
    How can this be achieved with blocks? Let's say: {begin} .... {end}, meaning, this could potentially cover large parts of line numbers. You're making a valid point here.
    – John Smith
    Jan 3, 2019 at 8:52
  • 1
    I guess you could add the first line number of the block to the begin tag, and the final line number to the end tag? Jan 3, 2019 at 9:06
  • 1
    Can you explain more clearly what you think will not work? Jan 3, 2019 at 11:47
  • 1
    I think an example of an input file that included such a block, and the expected output, would be a useful addition to the question. Jan 3, 2019 at 13:28
  • 1
    @JohnSmith I've added code and output. Can you confirm that the output is what you want, or explain what else may be required? Jan 3, 2019 at 16:35
2

Below is a short script to import the files, clean the data, create enumerated dictionaries, and output results (optional based on print_results variable).

(If I'm not interpreting your question correctly, please let me know!)

import re
from os import path

"""
Create an error class for trying to close a file that isn't open.
"""
class FileException(Exception):
    pass

class FileNotOpenError(FileException):
    pass

"""
Input variables.  base_path is just the directory where your files are located.
If they are in different directories, then use a second variable.
"""
base_path = r'C:\..\[folder containing text files]'
original_filename = 'test_text.txt'
modified_filename = 'modified_text.txt'


def import_data(file_name, root=base_path):
    """
    Read each text file into a list of lines.
    """
    full_path = path.join(root, file_name)

    with open(full_path, 'r') as f:
        data = f.readlines()

    try:
        f.close()
    except FileNotOpenError:
        pass

    if len(data) > 0:
        return data


def remove_numbering(input):
    """
    RegEx to clean data; This will remove only the line numbers and not
    any subsequent number-period combinations in the line.
    """
    p = re.compile(r'^([0-9]+[.]?\s)')
    return p.sub('', input)


def text_dict(text_list):
    """
    Remove numbering from either file; Considers period punctuation following number.
    """
    new_text = [remove_numbering(i).lstrip() for i in text_list]
    return {idx+1:val for idx, val in enumerate(new_text)}


def compare_files(original, modified, missing_list=None):

    # Create a fresh list (probably not necessary)
    if missing_list is None:
        missing_list = list()

    # Ensure that data types are dictionaries.
    if isinstance(original, dict) and isinstance(_modified, dict):
        # Use list comprehension to compare lines in each file.
        # Modified line numbers will end up in a list, which we will return.
        modified_index_list = [idx for idx in original.keys() if original[idx] != modified[idx]]

    # Check to see if list exists; Return it if it does.
    # if len(modified_index_list) > 0:
    if not modified_index_list is None:
        return modified_index_list


def comparison_findings(missing_list, original_dict, modified_dict):
    print('Modifications found on lines:\n- ' + '\n- '.join([str(i) for i in missing_list]))
    print('\n\n\tOriginal:\n')
    max_len = max([len(original_dict[i].replace('\n','').rstrip()) for i in original_dict.keys() if i in missing_list])
    print('\t\t{0:^7}{1:^{x}}'.format('Line','Value',x=max_len))
    for i in missing_list:
        temp_val = original_dict[i].replace('\n','').rstrip()
        print('\t\t{0:>5}{1:2}{2:<{x}}'.format(str(i), '', temp_val, x=max_len))
    print('\n\n\tModified:\n')
    max_len = max([len(modified_dict[i].replace('\n','').rstrip()) for i in modified_dict.keys() if i in missing_list])
    print('\t\t{0:^7}{1:^{x}}'.format('Line','Value',x=max_len))
    for i in xyz:
        temp_val = modified_dict[i].replace('\n','').rstrip()
        print('\t\t{0:>5}{1:2}{2:<{x}}'.format(str(i), '', temp_val, x=max_len))



if __name__ == '__main__':
    print_results = True

    # Import text files.
    orig_data = import_data(original_filename)
    mod_data = import_data(modified_filename)

    # Create enumerated dictionaries from text files.
    _original = text_dict(orig_data)
    _modified = text_dict(mod_data)

    # Get a list of modified lines.
    mod_list = compare_files(_original, _modified)

    # Output results of file comparison.
    if print_results:
        comparison_findings(mod_list, _original, _modified)
9
  • 1
    xyz not defined?
    – John Smith
    Jan 1, 2019 at 9:21
  • 1
    I want to grab the lines where the tags were not substituted by regex!
    – John Smith
    Jan 1, 2019 at 9:49
  • 2
    @JohnSmith On xyz: Whoops! Good catch. I'm still new to posting here and missed that. I think xyz supposed to be the missing_list argument, so I'll update the submission. Jan 1, 2019 at 20:52
  • 2
    @JohnSmith Do you mean column number or row number? If you want to find out where the '#' shows up, then you can use str.index('#'). txt = 'Happy 2019, soon. #{Some useful tag!} Something else goes here. ' txt.index('#') <- This will give you 18. Jan 1, 2019 at 21:06
  • 2
    @JohnSmith Okay, I'm a little slow and am still having a hard time grasping this. Are you saying that, for example, on line 1 in the original text file, if {tag} is removed, you want to know that that was removed, that it was on line 1, and what the tag was, and display those annotations in the modified text file? Again, sorry if I'm not quite getting it! Jan 2, 2019 at 12:23
1

When you call the function get_line inside highligh_merge, you are performing it with the modified line variable, so line will never actually be inside the original text file. If you look at the value of line:

#{Slugish}. Here goes another line. #{Slugish} since this is a new sentence.

You can see that this is clearly not in the original textfile.txt. Therefore, this returns a line number of -1.

A solution for this would be to change the for loop inside your highligh_merge function from:

for line in modified.splitlines(True):

To:

for numer, line in enumerate(modified.splitlines(True)):

Now, numer in each iteration is equal to the line count - 1. Just use numer + 1 to get the exact line count of the line you are processing.

I hope this helps. :)

7
  • 1
    I am still working on this, but if anyone can give an input with maybe more details, I'd be happy to learn. And if this definitely confirms that I am on the right path, then I'll give away the bounty to the user that deserves this.
    – John Smith
    Dec 28, 2018 at 9:34
  • 1
    A little bit of both. You have the link in there with all of the code.
    – John Smith
    Dec 28, 2018 at 9:40
  • No, I copied the files into a folder onto my computer and ran it with Python 3. You are using Python 3, aren't you? Dec 28, 2018 at 9:48
  • Maybe I am, who knows!
    – John Smith
    Dec 28, 2018 at 9:49
  • What are your results? Maybe you can use repl.it and share the running code!
    – John Smith
    Dec 28, 2018 at 9:50

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