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Is there a JSON Deserialization equivalent of Java's Google JSON in Ruby. With-out the necessity of defining any custom serializer or deserializer for each class, one can write a one-line code to convert JSON string into custom Java class as shown here under.

Address address=gson.fromJson(addressJsonStringForm, Address.class);

To accomplish this , one need-not put any annotations/interfaces in Address class nor write separate Deserializer utility for every class that we need to deserialize. This makes it very easy to deserialize/serialize classes from third party libraries. There are quite a lot of options on whether to serialize nulls / include /exclude certain attributes etc. I 'm looking for such a versatile JSON from and to custom object serialization/deserialization utility in Ruby. I 'm new to Ruby.

Reference:

https://dzone.com/articles/deserializing-json-java-object

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    What is wrong with JSON.parse? – spickermann Dec 22 '18 at 21:27
  • You will get an HashMap from JSON Parse, not the custom/domain object representation ASFAIK. @spickermann – Vineel Dec 22 '18 at 21:33
  • @Vineel Rubists deal differently with objects. Do you really need a "custom/domain" object representation? – vnbrs Dec 22 '18 at 21:39
  • @vnbrs what makes you think that we never need "domain" object back from JSON String ? Isn't there such an utility in Ruby? – Vineel Dec 22 '18 at 21:42
  • @Vineel the fact Ruby is not Java in terms of data typing (dynamic + strong typing) =). Btw, I did NOT say that we never need "domain". – vnbrs Dec 22 '18 at 21:45
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You can convert it into a Hash using the JSON module:

require 'json'

hash = JSON.parse('{"age":18, "name":"Vinicius"}')
hash["age"]
=> 18

If you want to convert it to a "structured" object, you can use OpenStruct:

require 'json'
require 'ostruct'

person = JSON.parse('{"age":18, "name":"Vinicius"}', object_class: OpenStruct)
person.name
=> "Vinicius"

An OpenStruct is a data structure, similar to a Hash, that allows the definition of arbitrary attributes with their accompanying values. This is accomplished by using Ruby's metaprogramming to define methods on the class itself. (docs)

OpenStruct may help you if you don't always know the JSON keys, as it dynamically creates an object.

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    Note: depending on how much performance matters to you, OpenStruct WILL slow you down over just using a Hash, or using a class or Struct. You may want to benchmark things at some point. – Nate Dec 22 '18 at 21:34
  • @vnbrs Upon opening the link, this is what I see. "Maintenance of Ruby 2.0.0 ended on February 24, 2016." – Vineel Dec 22 '18 at 21:37
  • I would use hashie before this. I’ve literally never seen someone use OpenStruct in production code anywhere, ever. – anothermh Dec 23 '18 at 1:53
  • Well, if you use Rails, you use OpenStruct, as Rails uses it in some parts of Active Storage, if I can recall correctly. Ruby plain Struct may be an alternative. It doesn't have this deep recursion OpenStruct has. – vnbrs Dec 23 '18 at 1:59

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