1

I was under the impression that PyCrypto was a direct wrapper of OpenSSL, but I seem to be getting unexpected results. I wrote a simple test in C;

int main() {
    const unsigned char test[] = "TEST_TEST_TEST";
    FILE *privateFile = fopen("private.pem", "r");
    RSA *privateRsa = PEM_read_RSAPrivateKey(privateFile, NULL, NULL, NULL);

    unsigned char *target = malloc(512);
    int len = RSA_private_encrypt(strlen(test), test, target, privateRsa, 1);

    for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
        printf("%02x", target[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
}

Which gives me one result;

a7c5832cf6390bcf75612e46c55759167e02173b2c6741ec4779af5d88488df8bfa6a6ba4c
fbc93d730dd3b4e681fca34d23c862712954ec85c087d9b36efa725b942fa7d8383019bcba
d467a1b31a3b0aeccf85cf1b4e4600801e3d40db75640f7e56f9bbb2a525d58e6decd02400
2049cadef9feea23f72f0fef72e9d2a5e9209011b7726422561f8fdfc7e983c28b600ff875
14b6ea4bb59addfaf8492ba71261d3837d9ae82507ab2f6cb7aaa0fe647f5d8d469b7a5e83
7b3bdf9994be8e621cdb04cec955ddd44170b9899daec891b492562b0df3d30d50367c710d
81400aefadb494d6f13d37237cf015280879d787de4d58ef3a5d61a200dd68642fdf

Then I used the same private.pem and did what I believe is the equivalent in Python;

from Crypto.Cipher import PKCS1_v1_5
from Crypto.PublicKey import RSA

private_key_filename = 'private.pem'
private_key_file = open(private_key_filename, 'rb')
private_key = RSA.importKey(private_key_file.read())
private_key_file.close()
cipher = PKCS1_v1_5.new(private_key)

encrypted = cipher.encrypt(bytes("TEST_TEST_TEST", "ascii"))
print("Encrypted: ", encrypted.hex())

Which gives me a very different result;

ac3de0ad667f26912b71baaf3f0c84198482a1822ef05f1d0b339a9e13be0fdc74c446bf74
0e14d07edbff1d893eb9a9745ee42501c50a7a0ec1352f96bf72c603afe6d4709ef3ea936a
4cda182dfc70d0a76967e79120f02e017e8f9aa30b1b444b5fe46396d6908e1e55febb948e
69cc1dcd9f9fbd44f449056d0655489834b564216c81c19f193548a53c77af8683d4c77d06
2f61fc4fe2c9e947f22523e0afb522f7addbedb2b1094c1a76245849d05acf465ba024f2da
77abe5fe6aac5913baf3ca4932806006bd41b82c76bdc328f24d5de9027819888b93a06c2d
2f972b78c775280691b4f53c181cc8d637ace1ea4642d1c510dceada85ae5957006e

Why does the python wrapper not produce the same result as the underlying C library? I'm guessing I'm doing something incorrect on the Python side, but I can not figure out what that might be. EDIT: For clarity, the C code is returning what I'm after, I need to make Python return the same thing. In doing some more digging, I'm thinking that my issue is that I need to specify RSA_PKCS1_PADDING in my Python code. When I try to decrypt on the C side, I get back;

4144797508:error:0407006A:rsa routines:RSA_padding_check_PKCS1_type_1:block type is not 01:rsa_pk1.c:103:
4144797508:error:04067072:rsa routines:RSA_EAY_PUBLIC_DECRYPT:padding check failed:rsa_eay.c:773:

Oddly enough, I do not see any sort of padding options in the pycrypto API..

I've re-generated my RSA key a few times, so any key will do, but just in case anyone cares to reproduce locally, here's the dummy key I'm testing with;

-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----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-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
  • PKCS1_v1_5 is for message authentication, not RSA encryption as used in your C code. – Klaus D. Dec 25 '18 at 4:13
  • According to the docs the C code should use RSA_sign to follow the same RSASSA-PKCS1-v1_5 specification as the Python code. – Michael Butscher Dec 25 '18 at 4:17
  • Fair enough, but the C code is returning what the target system is able to decrypt. The Python side is not.. So how do I make Python return the same thing the C code does? – XeroxDucati Dec 25 '18 at 4:22
0

Why does the Python implementation not produce the same results as the C code? Because you're using the PKCS #1.5 signature algorithm.

PKCS #1.5 calls for adding random padding to the message before signing it. Because of this, signing the same message multiple times will give a different value each time -- which you'll see if you run the Python version repeatedly. The OpenSSL documentation is an impenetrable morass, so I can't say exactly why you're getting the same signature every time with the C version, but I suspect you're failing to initialize a random-number generator or something.

0

You are doing completely different operations with openssl and with Python. You are performing RSA signing with openssl, but RSA encryption with PyCrypto. With openssl, as the documentation makes clear:

#include <openssl/rsa.h>
int RSA_private_encrypt(int flen, unsigned char *from, unsigned char *to, RSA *rsa, int padding);

RSA_private_encrypt() signs the flen bytes at from (usually a message digest with an algorithm identifier) using the private key rsa and stores the signature in to. to must point to RSA_size(rsa) bytes of memory.

In other words it perform RSA PKCS #1 ver 1.5 block type 1 signing.

Whereas in PyCrypto, despite the fact that you are using a private key, the encrypt method treats it as a public key (a pycrypto RSA private key is a subclass of RSA public key) and performs RSA PKCS#1 version 1.5 block type 2 encryption. Since you give no hint of what you are trying to accomplish I can't say which result is the correct one.

If you want PyCrypto RSA signing, the documentation has this example:

>>> from Crypto.Signature import pkcs1_15
>>> from Crypto.Hash import SHA256
>>> from Crypto.PublicKey import RSA
>>>
>>> message = 'To be signed'
>>> key = RSA.import_key(open('private_key.der').read())
>>> h = SHA256.new(message)
>>> signature = pkcs1_15.new(key).sign(h)
  • I think you're spot-on, it's signing, but I'm still getting odd mismatches. What I'm trying to do is generate a signed MD5 that a remote API will accept. I put some code here: pastebin.com/PFLj0giT -- snippet #1, c code, generates a signature that works, and decodes back to 16 bytes. Snippet #2 is the python version referencing your documentation pointer -- thank you for that! Snippet 3, back to C, trying to decode what python produces, and it still craps out. FWIW I've tried both SHA256 and MD5 on the python side, to no avail. – XeroxDucati Dec 25 '18 at 18:55
  • Sorry, missed the obvious.. So when I unhexify the python string, it DOES decrypt, but it returns 34 characters instead of the expected 16.. – XeroxDucati Dec 25 '18 at 19:02

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