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I'm trying to sort an array in Unity by name, using Array.Sort().

I've been reading as much as I can but still can't adapt it into my little project here. Here is what I have so far:

using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using UnityEngine;
using UnityEngine.UI;
using System;

public class UIController : MonoBehaviour, IComparable<Slot>
{
    public static UIController instance;
    public Text uiMessageBox;
    public Slot[] slots;

    private void Awake()
    {
        if (instance == null)
            instance = this;
        else
            Destroy(this);

        DontDestroyOnLoad(this);

        slots = FindObjectsOfType<Slot>();
        Array.Sort(slots, ); // HELP: NOT SURE WHAT TO PUT HERE
    }

    public int CompareTo(Slot other)
    {
        return this.name.CompareTo(other.name);
    }
}

Note, I deleted the parts I think are irrelevant in this class (such as the code that displays a message string on screen etc). If this isn't enough code, please let me know and I'll post it all.

ALSO NOTE: I implement here IComparable<Slot> but I also tried it with IComparable<UIController>. (like I say, I've seen lots of examples here and other websites, but cannot quite get it to work in my code.)

  • I think you also need to implement the non-generic IComparable docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… – Rotem Dec 25 '18 at 14:43
  • ok i will try, but actually i think i already did that on my first try. But will try again. Ta – Big T Larrity Dec 25 '18 at 14:43
  • Use the overload that accepts a lambda. Otherwise, move the CompareTo method to a separate class and pass new ThatClass() to Array.Sort. – GSerg Dec 25 '18 at 14:44
  • 3
    IComparable<T> means you can compare this to a T. You'd need to have Slot implement IComparable<Slot> or make (for instance - I'd create a separate SlotComparer class probably) your UIController class implement IComparer<Slot>. – Wai Ha Lee Dec 25 '18 at 14:44
  • 1
    @BigTLarrity Forget my comment, Wai Ha Lee got it right – Rotem Dec 25 '18 at 14:46
2

Why not use delegate form?

Array.Sort(slots, (slot1, slot2) => slot1.name.CompareTo(slot2.name));

If you still want to implement the IComparable interface, you must write it inside the Slot class.

And you can also implement IComparer interface in any class.

class AnyClass : IComparer<Slot>
{
    public int Compare(Slot slot1, Slot slot2)
    {
        return slot1.name.CompareTo(slot2.name);
    }
}
  • OMG! thanks for this, but simulataneously I just fixed it (thanks for Wai Ha Lee mainly). I was able to keep it all within my UIController class, which is great. I will post it as an answer to demonstrate. ..thanks all ! – Big T Larrity Dec 25 '18 at 14:51
  • @shingo, Array.Sort(slots, (slot1, slot2) => String.Compare(slot1.Name, slot2.Name, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)); will be better! – TanvirArjel Dec 25 '18 at 14:55
  • I've used delegate and that lambda function sign before a fair few times but it was a long time ago and I forgot most of how to use them. Its definitely something i need to study some more to get better understanding and use from . Cheers – Big T Larrity Dec 25 '18 at 14:58
  • I think the first override form is fastest to write, if you need sort at only one place. ヽ(✿゚▽゚)ノ – shingo Dec 25 '18 at 15:04
1

I was able to keep the code within my UIController class which is how I imagined it would be (since I built the array of slots there , it felt right for me to sort it there also.)

Here's how its done:

public class UIController : MonoBehaviour, IComparer<Slot>
{
public static UIController instance;
public Text uiMessageBox;
public Slot[] slots;


private void Awake()
{

    slots = FindObjectsOfType<Slot>();
    Array.Sort(slots, this); // i just passed 'this' as the IComparer parameter :)

}

public int Compare(Slot x, Slot y)
{
   return x.name.CompareTo(y.name);
}

}

  • Haha! This is the solution I was writing for you! :) – TanvirArjel Dec 25 '18 at 14:54
  • lol , sorry to beat you to it lol, and thanks anyway for the help! (I'm sure I'll need more soon haha :P) – Big T Larrity Dec 25 '18 at 14:55

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