35

Say i have an array

$array

Could anyone give me an example of how to use a foreach loop and print two lists after the initial array total has been counted and divided by two, with any remainder left in the second list?

So instead of just using the foreach to create one long list it will be creating two lists? like so...

  1. Value 1
  2. Value 2
  3. Value 3

and then the second list will continue to print in order

  1. Value 4
  2. Value 5
  3. Value 6
86

To get a part of an array, you can use array_slice:

$input = array("a", "b", "c", "d", "e");

$len = count($input);

$firsthalf = array_slice($input, 0, $len / 2);
$secondhalf = array_slice($input, $len / 2);
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thanks for this example, looks like most agree with you! – Andy Mar 22 '11 at 14:55
  • 11
    Original poster wanted the extra element in the second half, but if you want the extra element in the first half, use round($len / 2) in both places where you have $len / 2. – Dustin Graham Mar 12 '14 at 18:40
  • 1
    @DustinGraham how about floor() in the first half and ceil() in the second? An array with 5 items will be split as following: 2 / 3 – Fleuv Aug 24 '16 at 22:17
  • @Fleuv: An array with 5 items under your scenario would be split 1,2 and 4,5. The middle item would be left out. Coincidentally, that was just what I wanted, so thanks! – kloddant Aug 28 '18 at 15:27
  • To ignore middle element, use round($len/2) in second half only. – Dum Mar 16 at 5:55
16

Use array_chunk to split the array up into multiple sub-arrays, and then loop over each.

To find out how large the chunks should be to divide the array in half, use ceil(count($array) / 2).

<?php
$input_array = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f');
$arrays = array_chunk($input_array, 3);

foreach ($arrays as $array_num => $array) {
  echo "Array $array_num:\n";
  foreach ($array as $item_num => $item) {
    echo "  Item $item_num: $item\n";
  }
}

Output

Array 0:
  Item 0: a
  Item 1: b
  Item 2: c
Array 1:
  Item 0: d
  Item 1: e
  Item 2: f
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  • Thanks for putting it in a foreach e.t.c although most guys are suggesting array_slice.. – Andy Mar 22 '11 at 14:56
  • It should be ceil(count($array) / 2), not ciel. just a little helper. – Chris Andersson Jan 29 '15 at 15:06
15

http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-slice.php

To slice the array into half, use floor(count($array)/2) to know your offset.

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  • 2
    floor(count($array)/2) is nicer in case of an array with an odd number of elements. – Hammerite Mar 22 '11 at 14:54
  • True, added that the the original answer. – Peeter Mar 22 '11 at 16:35
3

Here's a one-liner which uses array_chunk:

list($part1, $part2) = array_chunk($array, ceil(count($array) / 2));

If you need to preserve keys, add true as the third argument:

list($part1, $part2) = array_chunk($array, ceil(count($array) / 2), true);
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2
$limit=count($array);

$first_limit=$limit/2;
for($i=0;$i<$first; $i++)
{
  echo $array[$i];
}
foreach ($i=$first; $i< $limit; $i++)
{
  echo $array[$i];
}
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1

Using a foreach loop you could do this:

$myarray = array("a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g");
$array1 = array();
$array2 = array();
$i = 1;

foreach ($myarray as $value) {
    if ($i <= count($myarray) / 2) {
        $array1[] = $value;
    } else {
        $array2[] = $value;
    }
    $i++;
}

But it's even easier to use array_splice

$myarray = array("a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g");
$array1 = array_splice($myarray, 0, floor(count($myarray)/2));
$array2 = $myarray;
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0

array_splice() is a single native function call which will perform as needed. It can:

  1. Mutate the original array to contain the first half of the data set and
  2. Return the removed second half of the data set.

The advantage in using this technique is that fewer functions are called and fewer variable are declared. In other words, there will be economy in terms of memory and performance.

Assuming you don't know the length of your array, count() divided by 2 will be necessary. For scenarios where the array count is odd, typically programmers prefer that the larger half comes first. To ensure this, use a negative value as the starting position parameter of the splice call. Because the native function expects an integer (not a float), it will automatically truncate the value to form an integer -- this replaces the need to call an extra function (such as ceil() or floor()). In my snippet to follow, the count is 5, half is 2.5, and the negative truncated starting position is 2 -- this means the final two elements will be removed from the input array.

A demonstration:

$array = ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5"];

$removed = array_splice(
    $array,
    -count($array) / 2
);

var_export([
    'first half' => $array,
    'second half' => $removed
]);

Output:

array (
  'first half' => 
  array (
    0 => '1',
    1 => '2',
    2 => '3',
  ),
  'second half' => 
  array (
    0 => '4',
    1 => '5',
  ),
)

Notice that the second half array is conveniently re-indexed.

array_chunk() is certainly appropriate as well and offers some conveniences. To avoid the extra ceil() call, just unconditionally add .5 to the preferred chunk length.

array_chunk($array, count($array) / 2 + .5)
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-1

This Worked for me made the first array always a little longer. Thought this might help people too.

$firsthalf = array_slice($input, 0, $len / 2 +1);
$secondhalf = array_slice($input, $len / 2 +1);
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-1

this is a pagination question. you can think the pagesize=2.

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