0

I have the following table:

ganado_id created     weight
1         2018-12-24  285
2         2018-12-24  288
2         2018-10-13  241
1         2018-10-13  244
1         2018-08-11  202

I need to calculate the average weight gain for each ganado_id. Desired output:

ganado_id avg_weight_gain
1         0.618
2         0.652

The average weight gain for ganado_id = 1 is calculated this way:

SELECT ((285 - 244)::NUMERIC / ('2018-12-24'::DATE - '2018-10-13'::DATE)::NUMERIC + (244 - 202)::NUMERIC / ('2018-10-13'::DATE - '2018-08-11'::DATE)::NUMERIC) / 2

The average weight gain for ganado_id = 2 is calculated this way:

SELECT (288 - 241)::NUMERIC / ('2018-12-24'::DATE - '2018-10-13'::DATE)::NUMERIC

In production, there can be 1 to 15 weight records (first table) for each ganado_id

2

Try using the lag aggregate function to show you both the weight from the previous record and the date from the previous record. You can then sum the two (gain from previous record, number of days from previous record) to get the average:

with gains as (
  select
    ganado_id, weight, created,
    weight - lag (weight) over (partition by ganado_id order by created) as gain,
    created - lag (created) over (partition by ganado_id order by created) as days
  from table1
)
select
  ganado_id, sum (gain) * 1.0 / sum (days) as avg_gain
from gains
group by
  ganado_id

-- EDIT --

Per your feedback, this would be the average of the averages:

with gains as (
  select
    ganado_id, weight, created,
    1.0 * (weight - lag (weight) over (partition by ganado_id order by created)) /
    (created - lag (created) over (partition by ganado_id order by created)) as gain_per_day
  from table
)
select
  ganado_id, avg (gain_per_day)
from gains
group by
  ganado_id

Results:

1   0.61805555555555555556
2   0.65277777777777777778
  • Thanks for the answer @Hambone. I need something slightly different. First I need to calculate the avg_gain but for each row, for example, the avg_gain for the first and second row, then the avg_gain for the second and third row, and after that calculate the average of avg_gain. – danielctf Dec 26 '18 at 15:15
  • I misunderstood... see edits and let me know if that helps. – Hambone Dec 26 '18 at 15:22
  • Your edit is exactly what I need. Thank you. – danielctf Dec 26 '18 at 15:26

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