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Let's say (not necessarily with DI) I have an interface to do something, and two different classes implementing it (doing different "somethings"):

public interface ISomethingDoer {
    void DoSomething();
}

public class DoerOfSomethingExciting : IDoSomething { ... }
public class DoerOfSomethingBoring : IDoSomething { ... }

And I have some method somewhere that uses ISomethingDoers of both types:

public class DoerOfVariousThings {
    ...

    public DoerOfVariousThings(ISomethingDoer excitingDoer, ISomethingDoer boringDoer) 
    {
        ...
    }

    public void DoVariousThings() {
        this.excitingDoer.DoSomething();
        this.boringDoer.DoSomething();
    }
}

But I want to be able to easily recompile with the things being done in a different order:

public void DoVariousThings() {
    this.excitingDoer.DoSomething();
    this.boringDoer.DoSomething();
}

I could just swap those two lines, and I'm done. But what I'd like more is something more like the following:

public class DoerOfVariousThings {
    ...

    public DoerOfVariousThings(ISomethingDoer firstDoer, ISomethingDoer secondDoer) 
    {
        ...
    }

    public void DoVariousThings() {
        this.firstDoer.DoSomething();
        this.secondDoer.DoSomething();
    }
}

That way, with plain, non-container-based, roll-your-own DI, I could make the change in the composition root rather than in the class:

public void BuildRoot() {
    // The change can be made by slightly modifying the following two lines
    ISomethingDoer firstDoer = new DoerOfSomethingExciting();
    ISomethingDoer secondDoer = new DoerOfSomethingBoring();

    var variousDoer = new DoerOfVariousThings(firstDoer, secondDoer);

    ...
}

But how do I support the same sort of thing cleanly with container-based DI? Specifically I'm trying to use SimpleInjector, but more general answers or answers for different frameworks could be helpful too.

Obviously I could register the two concrete ISomethingDoer implementations as concrete classes instead of as interface implementations, but this seems suboptimal: If I understand correctly, either the DoerOfVariousThings constructor would have to take those concrete classes instead of their interface, or else I would make the change in the composition root by swapping the parameter order of the DoerOfVariousThings constructor rather than by changing the newing-up of the objects that fill those parameters.

Really what I think I would like would be something more like the following (imagined syntax):

using (var container = ...) {
    container.Register<ISomethingDoer, DoerOfSomethingExciting>("first");
    container.Register<ISomethingDoer, DoerOfSomethingBoring>("second");

    ...
}

...

[DIParamMap("first", firstDoer)]
[DIParamMap("second", secondDoer)]
public DoerOfVariousThings(ISomethingDoer firstDoer, ISomethingDoer secondDoer) {
    ...
}

Can I do something like that? Or something better for this sort of scenario? If so, how? Thanks.

  • Did you consider injecting IEnumerable<ISomethingDoer> and just extracting the one ones you want in what ever order you want. – Nkosi Dec 26 '18 at 22:22
1

There are several options here. For instance, you can use context-based injection, register DoerOfVariousThings using a delegate, or inject a sequence of ISomethingDoer instances into DoerOfVariousThings instead of using separate constructor arguments.

When applying context-based injection, there are several ways to achieve this. For instance, you can base the injected dependency on the name of the constructor argument:

container.RegisterConditional<ISomethingDoer, DoerOfSomethingExciting>(
    c => c.Consumer.Target.Name.StartsWith("first"));
container.RegisterConditional<ISomethingDoer, DoerOfSomethingBoring>(
    c => c.Consumer.Target.Name.StartsWith("second"));

You could also mark the constructor arguments with your own custom attributes, much as you are proposing (although IMO this is the least attractive approach, as you are poluting your application code with attributes that are not relevant to that code):

// ctor with custom attributes
public DoerOfVariousThings(
    [Name("first")]ISomethingDoer firstDoer,
    [Name("second")]ISomethingDoer secondDoer)

container.RegisterConditional<ISomethingDoer, DoerOfSomethingExciting>(
    c => c.Consumer.Target.GetCustomAttribute<NameAttribute>().Name == "first");
container.RegisterConditional<ISomethingDoer, DoerOfSomethingBoring>(
    c => c.Consumer.Target.GetCustomAttribute<NameAttribute>().Name == "second");

Another option is to register a delegate for DoerOfVariousThings. For instance:

container.Register<DoerOfVariousThings>(() => new DoerOfVariousThings(
    firstDoer: container.GetInstance<DoerOfSomethingExciting>(),
    secondDoer: container.GetInstance<DoerOfSomethingBoring>()));

This approach is simple, although it prevents Simple Injector from analyzing your object graphs. Using RegisterConditional is therefore preferred.

Another option is to change the constructor of DoerOfVariousThings to the following:

// ctor with a collection of doers
public DoerOfVariousThings(IEnumerable<ISomethingDoer> doers)

This allows the doers to be registered as follows:

container.Collection.Register<ISomethingDoer>(typeof(DoerOfSomethingBoring).Assembly);

This uses Auto-Registration which will search through the supplied assembly for all implementations of ISomethingDoer and register them. Downside of this approach is, however, that the order of the registrations is undetermined. So you might instead want to do the following:

container.Collection.Append<ISomethingDoer, DoerOfSomethingExciting>();
container.Collection.Append<ISomethingDoer, DoerOfSomethingBoring>();

This appends both implementations to the collection of ISomethingDoer instances that will be injected into DoerOfVariousThings. Simple Injector guarantees that the components are injected in order of registration (which in this case means DoerOfSomethingExciting is element 0 and DoerOfSomethingBoring is element 1).

Alternatively, you can use the following method call as well:

container.Collection.Register<ISomethingDoer>(new[]
{
    typeof(DoerOfSomethingExciting),
    typeof(DoerOfSomethingBoring)
});
  • Thanks very much! That definitely helps a lot. One question about it, if you don't mind: Where does this information come from? I mean, I see that you're a SimpleInjector developer, so I guess it comes from your head, but for the rest of us. For example, unless I'm missing something, the API docs for, say, Container essentially amount to just "the Container class exists". Nothing about RegisterConditional or any other member. Or "Consumer" looks very interesting from your code sample, but I can't find it in the docs to try to find out what else it can do. Thanks again! – Bob Vesterman Dec 27 '18 at 8:58
  • In case it's not clear what I mean, here is a screenshot of what the website's documentation for the Container class looks like. Note that in the left pane, Container has no children (for methods or constructors or whatever). I'm guessing the things in the class doc's text such as "Methods for batch registration" are supposed to be hyperlinks rather than plain text? Several other classes are this way too, including at least one that seems potentially very interesting (the Registration class). – Bob Vesterman Dec 27 '18 at 9:12

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