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I have a vector that I'm storing data in. I want users to be able to decide the level of precision for the storage vector (either floats or doubles).

How do I declare a vector based on user input? This obviously doesn't work:

std::vector<userWantsFloats ? float : double> data; ...
  • 1
    Once you have such a class, how do you intend to put data into it? What do you expect that code to look like? – user1118321 Dec 27 '18 at 7:04
  • Sounds like you want to pass the type as a template argument. – JVApen Dec 27 '18 at 7:08
  • Why do you want the user to make this decision ? Is there any reason not to use double all the time ? – Sid S Dec 27 '18 at 7:11
  • @SidS I'm storing billions of floats/doubles and want the user to be able to choose the ability to sacrifice precision for memory. – Tyson Dec 27 '18 at 7:12
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    @SidS What else do you want me to elaborate upon? – Tyson Dec 27 '18 at 7:15
3

You cannot choose the type used in a class template instantiation based on a value that is known only at run time.

Use of

std::vector<userWantsFloats ? float : double> data;

is OK if the value of userWantsFloats is known at compile time. It is not OK if the value of userWantsFloats is not known only at run time.

You'll have to use something along the lines of:

if ( userWantsFloats )
{
   std::vector<float> data;
   // Use data
}
else
{
   std::vector<double> data;
   // Use data
}

To be able to maximize reuse of rest of your code, they have to be function templates and/or class templates.

template <typename T>
void myAppLogic(std::vector<T>& data)
{
   // Do the work of your application
}

if ( userWantsFloats )
{
   std::vector<float> data;
   myAppLogic(data);
}
else
{
   std::vector<double> data;
   myAppLogic(data);
}
3

A option could be to use a std::variant.

std::variant<std::vector<float>, std::vector<double>> data;

You then initialize the variant based on user input, but can write any logic only once by using std::visit

std::visit([](auto&& vec) {
  // Do your thing
}, data);

If C++17 is not an option, then boost has a variant template that inspired the now standard one. You can use that instead. Consult the boost documentation on the subject.

  • Unfortunately neither boost nor c++17 are usable for this project. Thank you for the explanation, I'll save it in case c++17 eventually becomes an option. – Tyson Dec 27 '18 at 7:18
  • std::any is perhaps better – Michael Dec 27 '18 at 8:43
  • @Michael - How? Using std::any means you'd need to manage a type switch yourself everywhere and duplicate logic. It's not what it's meant for. – StoryTeller Dec 27 '18 at 8:44

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