563

Is there anyway of getting rounded corners on the outline of a div element, similar to border-radius?

9
  • 2
    Well I have got a Div box with a 2px Gray Border with 20px border-radius, I was wandering if I can then have a 10px Outine around that Border that follows the Border rather than being square – Marc Guerin Mar 22 '11 at 16:12
  • 4
    This is a good question. An element with border: 5px red and outline: 5px blue and border-radius: 5px, the border is rounded, but the outline is square. – Matthew Rudy Aug 20 '12 at 10:37
  • 5
    So far we can only use it in Firefox: -moz-outline-radius – Wojciech Bednarski May 13 '13 at 14:37
  • It should be part of CSS3... If I think about it - I hate W3C :D – m93a May 27 '13 at 13:34
  • 22
    you all need a box-shadow in your life.. – Muhammad Umer Dec 29 '14 at 6:35

19 Answers 19

635

Old question now, but this might be relevant for somebody with a similar issue. I had an input field with rounded border and wanted to change colour of focus outline. I couldn't tame the horrid square outline to the input control.

So instead, I used box-shadow. I actually preferred the smooth look of the shadow, but the shadow can be hardened to simulate a rounded outline:

 /* Smooth outline with box-shadow: */
    .text1:focus {
        box-shadow: 0 0 3pt 2pt red;
    }

    /* Hard "outline" with box-shadow: */
    .text2:focus {
        box-shadow: 0 0 0 2pt red;
    }
<input type=text class="text1"> 
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<input type=text class="text2">

17
  • 30
    IMO, this is the answer you're looking for. I've done this method but don't overlook turning your outline to 0. – John Morton Jul 23 '12 at 22:40
  • 2
    This is exactly what I was looking for, and fits even better than an outline radius. – Zenexer Jun 8 '13 at 16:15
  • 2
    The hard outline example does not work. It's just a rectangle without a corner radius. – Erik Aigner Dec 15 '14 at 16:44
  • 3
    outline: 0 breaks web accessibility; read outlinenone.com – ianstarz Aug 23 '16 at 14:58
  • 5
    @ianstarz, it breaks accessibility when you provide no alternative styling. box-shadow is the alternative styling (which, as presented here, is actually very similar in appearance as outline). – ACJ Jun 3 '19 at 14:32
98

I usually accomplish this using the :after pseudo-element:

of course it depends on usage, this method allows control over individual borders, rather than using the hard shadow method.

you could also set -1px offsets and use a background linear gradient (no border) for a different effect once again.

body {
  margin: 20px;
}

a {
  background: #999;
  padding: 10px 20px;
  border-radius: 5px;
  text-decoration: none;
  color: #fff;
  position: relative;
  border: 2px solid #000;
}

a:after {
  content: '';
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  border-radius: 5px;
  border: 2px solid #ccc;
}
<a href="#">Button</a>

4
  • 5
    A modified and a little more spectacular version: jsfiddle.net/rh6j3cdm . – Dávid Horváth Sep 9 '15 at 17:07
  • 2
    It is not possible to make an ::after pseudo for an input field – Simon Franzen May 6 '18 at 0:26
  • thanks, this worked VERY well with react-sortable-tree's search query outlines! – Monarch Wadia Aug 3 '18 at 9:38
  • I like this solution because it's much more flexible than the box-shadow version. For example, if you want the "outline" to be spaced away from the element (i.e. simulating outline-offset) it becomes possible with this technique. – Kirk Woll Jan 4 '19 at 22:30
43

Similar to Lea Hayes above, but here's how I did it:

div {
  background: #999;
  height: 100px;
  width: 200px;
  border: #999 solid 1px;
  border-radius: 10px;
  margin: 15px;
  box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 1px #fff inset;
}
<div></div>

No nesting of DIVs or jQuery necessary, Altho for brevity I have left out the -moz and -webkit variants of some of the CSS. You can see the result above

3
  • 6
    He's talking about the OUTLINE, not the border... "outline" radius – android.nick Mar 2 '12 at 12:40
  • 5
    correct, but since outline-radius is not available, my method gives the appearance of a border as well as an outline. This is a visual effect, so unless Marc's design is specified-down-to-the-pixel, the the fact that it doesn't actually use the outline property makes no difference. And since it's a practical solution, I'd appreciate the vote back – Heraldmonkey Mar 4 '12 at 7:28
  • 2
    This worked great. I didn't use inset, though, and got what I wanted. – Paul Schreiber Aug 29 '13 at 19:09
21

I wanted some nice focus accessibility for dropdown menus in a Bootstrap navbar, and was pretty happy with this:

     a.dropdown-toggle:focus {
         display: inline-block;
         box-shadow: 0 0 0 2px #88b8ff;
         border-radius: 2px;
     }
<a href="https://stackoverflow.com" class="dropdown-toggle">Visit Stackoverflow</a>

0
17

You're looking for something like this, I think.

div {
    -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px;
    border-radius: 10px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    background-color: #CCC;
    height: 100px;
    width: 160px;
}

Edit

There is a Firefox-only -moz-outline-radius properly, but that won't work on IE/Chrome/Safari/Opera/etc. So, it looks like the most cross-browser-compatible way* to get a curved line around a border is to use a wrapper div:

div.inner {
  -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
  -moz-border-radius: 10px;
  border-radius: 10px;
  border: 1px solid black;
  background-color: #CCC;
  height: 100px;
  width: 160px;
}

div.outer {
  display: inline-block;
  -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
  -moz-border-radius: 10px;
  border-radius: 10px;
  border: 1px solid red;
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="inner"></div>
</div>


*aside from using images

7
  • 24
    No , I know how to get the Border Radius I was wandering if you could get an Outline-Radius – Marc Guerin Mar 22 '11 at 16:08
  • Meaning what, exactly? A thicker outline, like this? jsfiddle.net/mattball/NXZFv/1 – Matt Ball Mar 22 '11 at 16:09
  • 11
    @Matt: a curved outline instead of a border, obviously. See w3.org/TR/CSS21/ui.html#dynamic-outlines – Joey Mar 22 '11 at 16:10
  • Well I have got a Div box with a 2px Gray Border with 20px border-radius, I was wandering if I can then have a 10px Outine around that Border that follows the Border rather than being square. – Marc Guerin Mar 22 '11 at 16:11
  • 1
    Just one addition to your code matt, if you drop the border radius a few px on the inner box the corner then becomes much tighter, thanks for your help – Marc Guerin Mar 22 '11 at 16:36
16

We may see our wishes soonish by setting outline-style: auto It's on WebKits radar: http://trac.webkit.org/changeset/198062/webkit

See ya in 2030.

1
  • Very cool, although this still leaves something to be desired, my use case is outline-style: dashed with a radius as well (like you can do with a border). Currently only firefox supports this through its -moz-outline-radius – xec Jan 13 at 10:16
14

Use this one: box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 1px red;

9

I just found a great solution for this, and after looking at all the responses so far, I haven't seen it posted yet. So, here's what I did:

I created a CSS Rule for the class and used a pseudo-class of :focus for that rule. I set outline: none to get rid of that default light-blue non-border-radius-able 'outline' that Chrome uses by default. Then, in that same :focus pseudo-class, where that outline no longer exists, I added my radius and border properties. Leading to the following

outline: none;
border-radius: 5px;
border: 2px solid maroon;

to have a maroon-colored outline with a border radius that now appears when the element is tab-selected by the user.

1
  • 1
    Using "outline: 0", or "outline: none" is considered bad practice and messes up user accessibility. At this point, I do not have a fix, but here is an article about why you should not remove the outline if possible and what to do if you absolutely must. Never remove CSS outlines – AndrewBrntt May 28 '20 at 20:54
6

If you want to get an embossed look you could do something like the following:

.embossed {
  background: #e5e5e5;
  height: 100px;
  width: 200px;
  border: #FFFFFF solid 1px;
  outline: #d0d0d0 solid 1px;
  margin: 15px;
}

.border-radius {
  border-radius: 20px 20px 20px 20px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 20px;
  -moz-border-radius: 20px;
  -khtml-border-radius: 20px;
}

.outline-radius {
  -moz-outline-radius: 21px;
}
<div class="embossed"></div>
<div class="embossed border-radius"></div>
<div class="embossed border-radius outline-radius">-MOZ ONLY</div>

I have not found a work around to have this work in other browsers.

EDIT: The only other way you can do this is to use box-shadow, but then this wont work if you already have a box shadow on that element.

1
  • 1
    You can use multiple shadows on the same element, separating them by commas. – Bangash Apr 8 '14 at 19:49
5

As far as I know, the Outline radius is only supported by Firefox and Firefox for android.

-moz-outline-radius: 1em;

enter image description here

3

No. Borders sit on the outside of the element and on the inside of the box-model margin area. Outlines sit on the inside of the element and the box-model padding area ignores it. It isn't intended for aesthetics. It's just to show the designer the outlines of the elements. In the early stages of developing an html document for example, a developer might need to quickly discern if they have put all of the skeletal divs in the correct place. Later on they may need to check if various buttons and forms are the correct number of pixels apart from each other.

Borders are aesthetic in nature. Unlike outlines they are actually apart of the box-model, which means they do not overlap text set to margin: 0; and each side of the border can be styled individually.

If you're trying to apply a corner radius to outline I assume you are using it the way most people use border. So if you don't mind me asking, what property of outline makes it desirable over border?

5
  • 10
    The purpose of outlines is for keyboard navigation/accessibility, not to show developers where elements are – danwellman May 10 '16 at 8:48
  • 1
    Well that's what browsers use them for, by default. But I have always used them to see where my divs are, to great effect. – Musixauce3000 May 10 '16 at 16:16
  • 1
    +1 for mentionning that "Borders sit on the outside of the element and on the inside of the box-model margin area. Outlines sit on the inside of the element and the box-model padding area ignores it." – Jacques Oct 7 '18 at 0:59
  • @danwellman Perhaps you don't, but many people do, especially with commercial designs where margins are defined by strict rules and standards. – user10398534 Sep 6 '20 at 12:01
  • 2
    "what property of outline makes it desirable over border" Outline lets you use outline-offset, making it appear farther from the element as if it were scaled up. I was not able to achieve similar results easily with border or shadow. – user10398534 Sep 6 '20 at 12:02
3

As others have said, only firefox supports this. Here is a work around that does the same thing, and even works with dashed outlines.

example

.has-outline {
    display: inline-block;
    background: #51ab9f;
    border-radius: 10px;
    padding: 5px;
    position: relative;
}
.has-outline:after {
  border-radius: 10px;
  padding: 5px;
  border: 2px dashed #9dd5cf;
  position: absolute;
  content: '';
  top: -2px;
  left: -2px;
  bottom: -2px;
  right: -2px;
}
<div class="has-outline">
  I can haz outline
</div>

2

There is the solution if you need only outline without border. It's not mine. I got if from Bootstrap css file. If you specify outline: 1px auto certain_color, you'll get thin outer line around div of certain color. In this case the specified width has no matter, even if you specify 10 px width, anyway it will be thin line. The key word in mentioned rule is "auto".
If you need outline with rounded corners and certain width, you may add css rule on border with needed width and same color. It makes outline thicker.

1

COMBINING BOX SHADOW AND OUTLINE.

A slight twist on Lea Hayes answer I found

input[type=text]:focus {
    box-shadow: 0 0 0 1pt red;
    outline-width: 1px;
    outline-color: red;
}

gets a really nice clean finish. No jumping in size which you get when using border-radius

0

Try using padding and a background color for the border, then a border for the outline:

.round_outline {
  padding: 8px;
  background-color: white;
  border-radius: 50%;
  border: 1px solid black;
}

Worked in my case.

0

I just set outline transparent.

input[type=text] {
  outline: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0);
  border-radius: 10px;
}

input[type=text]:focus {    
  border-color: #0079ff;
}
0

I like this way.

.circle:before {
   content: "";
   width: 14px;
   height: 14px;
   border: 3px solid #fff;
   background-color: #ced4da;
   border-radius: 7px;
   display: inline-block;
   margin-bottom: -2px;
   margin-right: 7px;
   box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 1px #ced4da;
}

It will create gray circle with wit border around it and again 1px around border!

0
clip-path: circle(100px at center);

This will actually make clickable only circle, while border-radius still makes a square, but looks as circle.

0
0

The simple answer to the basic question is no. The only cross-browser option is to create a hack that accomplishes what you want. This approach does carry with it certain potential issues when it comes to styling pre-existing content, but it provides for more customization of the outline (offset, width, line style) than many of the other solutions.

On a basic level, consider the following static example (run the snippent for demo):

.outline {
    border: 2px dotted transparent;
    border-radius: 5px;
    display: inline-block;
    padding: 2px;
    margin: -4px;
}

/* :focus-within does not work in Edge or IE */
.outline:focus-within, .outline.edge {
    border-color: blue;
}

br {
    margin-bottom: 0.75rem;
}
<h3>Javascript-Free Demo</h3>
<div class="outline edge"><input type="text" placeholder="I always have an outline"/></div><br><div class="outline"><input type="text" placeholder="I have an outline when focused"/></div> *<i>Doesn't work in Edge or IE</i><br><input type="text" placeholder="I have never have an outline" />
<p>Note that the outline does not increase the spacing between the outlined input and other elements around it. The margin (-4px) compensates for the space that the outlines padding (-2px) and width (2px) take up, a total of 4px.</p>

Now, on a more advanced level, it would be possible to use JavaScript to bootstrap elements of a given type or class so that they are wrapped inside a div that simulates an outline on page load. Furthermore, event bindings could be established to show or hide the outline on user interactions like this (run the snippet below or open in JSFiddle):

h3 {
  margin: 0;
}

div {
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

.flex {
  display: flex;
}

.clickable {
  cursor: pointer;
}

.box {
  background: red;
  border: 1px solid black;
  border-radius: 10px;
  height: 5rem;
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  text-align: center;
  color: white;
  font-weight: bold;
  padding: 0.5rem;
  margin: 1rem;
}
<h3>Javascript-Enabled Demo</h3>
<div class="flex">
  <div class="box outline-me">I'm outlined because I contain<br>the "outline-me" class</div>
  <div class="box clickable">Click me to toggle outline</div>
</div>
<hr>
<input type="text" placeholder="I'm outlined when focused" />

<script>
// Called on an element to wrap with an outline and passed a styleObject
// the styleObject can contain the following outline properties:
// 		style, width, color, offset, radius, bottomLeftRadius,
//		bottomRightRadius, topLeftRadius, topRightRadius
// It then creates a new div with the properties specified and 
// moves the calling element into the div
// The newly created wrapper div receives the class "simulated-outline"
Element.prototype.addOutline = function (styleObject, hideOutline = true) {
    var element = this;

    // create a div for simulating an outline
    var outline = document.createElement('div');

    // initialize css formatting
    var css = 'display:inline-block;';

    // transfer any element margin to the outline div
    var margins = ['marginTop', 'marginBottom', 'marginLeft', 'marginRight'];
    var marginPropertyNames = { 
        marginTop: 'margin-top',
        marginBottom: 'margin-bottom',
        marginLeft: 'margin-left',
        marginRight: 'margin-right'
    }
    var outlineWidth = Number.parseInt(styleObject.width);
    var outlineOffset = Number.parseInt(styleObject.offset);
    for (var i = 0; i < margins.length; ++i) {
        var computedMargin = Number.parseInt(getComputedStyle(element)[margins[i]]);
        var margin = computedMargin - outlineWidth - outlineOffset;
        css += marginPropertyNames[margins[i]] + ":" + margin + "px;";
    }
    element.style.cssText += 'margin:0px !important;';
    
    // compute css border style for the outline div
    var keys = Object.keys(styleObject);
    for (var i = 0; i < keys.length; ++i) {
        var key = keys[i];
        var value = styleObject[key];
        switch (key) {
            case 'style':
                var property = 'border-style';
                break;
            case 'width':
                var property = 'border-width';
                break;
            case 'color':
                var property = 'border-color';
                break;
            case 'offset':
                var property = 'padding';
                break;
            case 'radius':
                var property = 'border-radius';
                break;
            case 'bottomLeftRadius':
                var property = 'border-bottom-left-radius';
                break;
            case 'bottomRightRadius':
                var property = 'border-bottom-right-radius';
                break;
            case 'topLeftRadius':
                var property = 'border-top-left-radius-style';
                break;
            case 'topRightRadius':
                var property = 'border-top-right-radius';
                break;
        }
        css += property + ":" + value + ';';
    }
    
    // apply the computed css to the outline div
    outline.style.cssText = css;
    
    // add a class in case we want to do something with elements
    // receiving a simulated outline
    outline.classList.add('simulated-outline');
    
    // place the element inside the outline div
    var parent = element.parentElement;
    parent.insertBefore(outline, element);
    outline.appendChild(element);

    // determine whether outline should be hidden by default or not
    if (hideOutline) element.hideOutline();
}

Element.prototype.showOutline = function () {
    var element = this;
    // get a reference to the outline element that wraps this element
    var outline = element.getOutline();
    // show the outline if one exists
    if (outline) outline.classList.remove('hide-outline');
}


Element.prototype.hideOutline = function () {
    var element = this;
    // get a reference to the outline element that wraps this element
    var outline = element.getOutline();
    // hide the outline if one exists
    if (outline) outline.classList.add('hide-outline');
}

// Determines if this element has an outline. If it does, it returns the outline
// element. If it doesn't have one, return null.
Element.prototype.getOutline = function() {
    var element = this;
    var parent = element.parentElement;
    return (parent.classList.contains('simulated-outline')) ? parent : null;
}

// Determines the visiblity status of the outline, returning true if the outline is
// visible and false if it is not. If the element has no outline, null is returned.
Element.prototype.outlineStatus = function() {
    var element = this;
    var outline = element.getOutline();
    if (outline === null) {
        return null;
    } else {
        return !outline.classList.contains('hide-outline');
    }
}

// this embeds a style element in the document head for handling outline visibility
var embeddedStyle = document.querySelector('#outline-styles');
if (!embeddedStyle) {
    var style = document.createElement('style');
    style.innerText = `
        .simulated-outline.hide-outline {
            border-color: transparent !important;
        }
    `;
    document.head.append(style);
}


/*########################## example usage ##########################*/

// add outline to all elements with "outline-me" class
var outlineMeStyle = {
    style: 'dashed',
    width: '3px',
    color: 'blue',
    offset: '2px',
    radius: '5px'
};
document.querySelectorAll('.outline-me').forEach((element)=>{
  element.addOutline(outlineMeStyle, false);
});


// make clickable divs get outlines
var outlineStyle = {
    style: 'double',
    width: '4px',
    offset: '3px',
    color: 'red',
    radius: '10px'
};
document.querySelectorAll('.clickable').forEach((element)=>{
    element.addOutline(outlineStyle);
    element.addEventListener('click', (evt)=>{
        var element = evt.target;
        (element.outlineStatus()) ? element.hideOutline() : element.showOutline();
    });
});


// configure inputs to only have outline on focus
document.querySelectorAll('input').forEach((input)=>{
    var outlineStyle = {
        width: '2px',
        offset: '2px',
        color: 'black',
        style: 'dotted',
        radius: '10px'
    }
    input.addOutline(outlineStyle);
    input.addEventListener('focus', (evt)=>{
        var input = evt.target;
        input.showOutline();
    });
    input.addEventListener('blur', (evt)=>{
        var input = evt.target;
        input.hideOutline();
    });
});
</script>

In closing, let me reiterate, that implementing this approach may require more styling than what I have included in my demos, especially if you have already styled the element you want outlined.

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