107

A fairly simple question. What's the difference between:

$merged = array_merge($array1, $array2);

and

$merged = $array1 + $array2;

?

67

The difference is:

The + operator takes the union of the two arrays, whereas the array_merge function takes the union BUT the duplicate keys are overwritten.

  • So, what's the difference between these 2: array_merge, plus sign (although I had to switch around the arrays)? – Joseph Silber Dec 6 '11 at 20:13
  • 15
    A word of caution for beginners here, the result of the operation in both cases is null if any one of the arrays is null. Some might not care about this assuming since it is a union operation, the result will be the proper (not-null) array if one of them is null. But, that holds true if one of the arrays is an empty array. So, as a good practice, I think, we should initialize the input arrays as empty arrays. What do you guys say? – Sandeepan Nath Jul 13 '12 at 6:58
  • 6
    If there are duplicate keys, "taking the union" will always have to get rid of one of them. The difference is in which one. – alexis Mar 11 '16 at 9:19
  • 5
    Sorry, this answer is confusing, wrong, and incomplete. :-o See @alexis's comment regarding the confusing bit (although his is also just half of the truth regarding the OP). 2. See Yehosef's answer about what array_merge actually does... 3. And see BoltClock's answer about another crucial difference not mentioned here: array_merge resets numeric keys, unlike +. – Sz. Sep 20 '18 at 23:31
  • not specific at all. not helpful. does not highlight the difference. too high level of an explanation. – ahnbizcad Mar 1 '19 at 18:53
83

Here's a simple illustrative test:

$ar1 = [
   0  => '1-0',
  'a' => '1-a',
  'b' => '1-b'
];


$ar2 = [
   0  => '2-0',
   1  => '2-1',
  'b' => '2-b',
  'c' => '2-c'
];

print_r($ar1+$ar2);

print_r(array_merge($ar1,$ar2));

with the result:

Array
(
  [0] => 1-0
  [a] => 1-a
  [b] => 1-b
  [1] => 2-1
  [c] => 2-c
)
Array
(
  [0] => 1-0
  [a] => 1-a
  [b] => 2-b
  [1] => 2-0
  [2] => 2-1
  [c] => 2-c
)

Notice that duplicate non-numeric keys will take the first value using the union operator but the later one using the array_merge.

For numeric keys, the first value will be used with the union operator whereas the all the values will be used with the array_merge, just reindexed.

I generally use union operator for associative arrays and array_merge for numeric. Of course, you can just as well use the array_merge for associative, just that the later values overwrite earlier ones.

51

array_merge() causes all numeric keys found in the input arrays to be reindexed in the resultant array. The union operator + does not cause a reindex.

20

The + sign only takes the value from the first occurence of an array key.
array_merge takes the value from the last occurrence of an array key.

Example:

$first = ['a'=>'one',
        'b'=>'two',
        'c'=>'three'];

$second = ['a'=>'fourth',
        'b'=>'fifth',
        'c'=>'sixth',
        '3'=>'number three'];

$merged = $first + $second;
echo "<pre> plus sign merge\n";
var_dump($merged);

$merged = array_merge($first,$second);
echo "\n array_merge function merge\n";
var_dump($merged);

This outputs:

plus sign merge
array(4) {
["a"]=>
string(3) "one"
["b"]=>
string(3) "two"
["c"]=>
string(5) "three"
[3]=>
string(12) "number three"
}

array_merge function merge
array(4) {
["a"]=>
string(6) "fourth"
["b"]=>
string(5) "fifth"
["c"]=>
string(5) "sixth"
[0]=>
string(12) "number three"
}

Interesting to note in this is that the array_merge actally erases the '3' index of number three even though it's a string, because it's a number.

So take care when merging with array_merge arrays with numerical indexes. They might lose their keys. if they are important to you precede them with a string.

so instead of '3' => 'three' use something like '_3' => 'three'

  • 5
    "even though it's a string, because it's a number" deserves a +1 :-) – Ring Ø Jul 9 '16 at 11:06
19

array_merge vs plus

Source: https://softonsofa.com/php-array_merge-vs-array_replace-vs-plus-aka-union/

Stop using array_merge($defaults, $options):

function foo(array $options)
{
   $options += ['foo' => 'bar'];

   // ...
}

Note: array_replace function exists since PHP5.3.

  • why should we stop using array_merge($default, $options):? because it disallows non-indexed keys? – ahnbizcad Mar 2 '19 at 1:19
  • but the answer is really didactic +1 – snr Jun 30 '19 at 16:38
5

I believe array_merge overwrites duplicate non_numeric keys while $array1 + $array2 does not.

3

Yet another example (arrays without explicit keys; it's obvious regarding to how the operator + and array_merge work, but "obvious" things are simpler when seen ;))

$a = array('apple');
$b = array('orange', 'lemon');

echo '$a + $b = ';             print_r($a + $b);
echo 'array_merge($a, $b) = '; print_r(array_merge($a, $b));

will give:

$a + $b = Array
(
    [0] => apple
    [1] => lemon
)
array_merge($a, $b) = Array
(
    [0] => apple
    [1] => orange
    [2] => lemon
)
0

Please pay attention for another difference: the union (+) won't overwrite non-empty value with empty value (considering a same key), whereas array_merge will:

$a = array('foo' => 'bar');
$b = array('foo' => ''); // or false or 0

print_r($a+$b);
print_r(array_merge($a, $b);

Outputs :

Array
(
    [foo] => bar
)
Array
(
    [foo] => 0
)
0

So apparently if you change the order both union and merge will do the same thing

$a = array('foo' => 'bar', 'x' => 'fromA');
$b = array('foo' => null, 'x' => 'fromB');

echo '$a+$b: ';
var_dump($a+$b);

echo '$b+$a: ';
var_dump($b+$a);

echo 'array_merge($a, $b): ';
var_dump(array_merge($a, $b));

echo 'array_merge($b, $a): ';
var_dump(array_merge($b, $a));

Outputs :

$a+$b: array(2) {
  ["foo"]=>
  string(3) "bar"
  ["x"]=>
  string(5) "fromA"
}
$b+$a: array(2) {
  ["foo"]=>
  NULL
  ["x"]=>
  string(5) "fromB"
}
array_merge($a, $b): array(2) {
  ["foo"]=>
  NULL
  ["x"]=>
  string(5) "fromB"
}
array_merge($b, $a): array(2) {
  ["foo"]=>
  string(3) "bar"
  ["x"]=>
  string(5) "fromA"
}

Keep in mind the order of the arrays.

  • You changed the order: $a+$b vs $b+$a. Nothing is overridden. – ZbyszekKr Oct 9 '18 at 13:13
  • Whoops, 🤔@ZbyszekKr thanks. I don't know how I missed that. Will revisit and edit my answer. – Nedyalko Dyakov Oct 12 '18 at 14:14

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