386

Problem

I am writing an application in React and was unable to avoid a super common pitfall, which is calling setState(...) after componentWillUnmount(...).

I looked very carefully at my code and tried to put some guarding clauses in place, but the problem persisted and I am still observing the warning.

Therefore, I've got two questions:

  1. How do I figure out from the stack trace, which particular component and event handler or lifecycle hook is responsible for the rule violation?
  2. Well, how to fix the problem itself, because my code was written with this pitfall in mind and is already trying to prevent it, but some underlying component's still generating the warning.

Browser console

Warning: Can't perform a React state update on an unmounted component.
This is a no-op, but it indicates a memory leak in your application.
To fix, cancel all subscriptions and asynchronous tasks in the componentWillUnmount
method.
    in TextLayerInternal (created by Context.Consumer)
    in TextLayer (created by PageInternal) index.js:1446
d/console[e]
index.js:1446
warningWithoutStack
react-dom.development.js:520
warnAboutUpdateOnUnmounted
react-dom.development.js:18238
scheduleWork
react-dom.development.js:19684
enqueueSetState
react-dom.development.js:12936
./node_modules/react/cjs/react.development.js/Component.prototype.setState
react.development.js:356
_callee$
TextLayer.js:97
tryCatch
runtime.js:63
invoke
runtime.js:282
defineIteratorMethods/</prototype[method]
runtime.js:116
asyncGeneratorStep
asyncToGenerator.js:3
_throw
asyncToGenerator.js:29

enter image description here

Code

Book.tsx

import { throttle } from 'lodash';
import * as React from 'react';
import { AutoWidthPdf } from '../shared/AutoWidthPdf';
import BookCommandPanel from '../shared/BookCommandPanel';
import BookTextPath from '../static/pdf/sde.pdf';
import './Book.css';

const DEFAULT_WIDTH = 140;

class Book extends React.Component {
  setDivSizeThrottleable: () => void;
  pdfWrapper: HTMLDivElement | null = null;
  isComponentMounted: boolean = false;
  state = {
    hidden: true,
    pdfWidth: DEFAULT_WIDTH,
  };

  constructor(props: any) {
    super(props);
    this.setDivSizeThrottleable = throttle(
      () => {
        if (this.isComponentMounted) {
          this.setState({
            pdfWidth: this.pdfWrapper!.getBoundingClientRect().width - 5,
          });
        }
      },
      500,
    );
  }

  componentDidMount = () => {
    this.isComponentMounted = true;
    this.setDivSizeThrottleable();
    window.addEventListener("resize", this.setDivSizeThrottleable);
  };

  componentWillUnmount = () => {
    this.isComponentMounted = false;
    window.removeEventListener("resize", this.setDivSizeThrottleable);
  };

  render = () => (
    <div className="Book">
      { this.state.hidden && <div className="Book__LoadNotification centered">Book is being loaded...</div> }

      <div className={this.getPdfContentContainerClassName()}>
        <BookCommandPanel
          bookTextPath={BookTextPath}
          />

        <div className="Book__PdfContent" ref={ref => this.pdfWrapper = ref}>
          <AutoWidthPdf
            file={BookTextPath}
            width={this.state.pdfWidth}
            onLoadSuccess={(_: any) => this.onDocumentComplete()}
            />
        </div>

        <BookCommandPanel
          bookTextPath={BookTextPath}
          />
      </div>
    </div>
  );

  getPdfContentContainerClassName = () => this.state.hidden ? 'hidden' : '';

  onDocumentComplete = () => {
    try {
      this.setState({ hidden: false });
      this.setDivSizeThrottleable();
    } catch (caughtError) {
      console.warn({ caughtError });
    }
  };
}

export default Book;

AutoWidthPdf.tsx

import * as React from 'react';
import { Document, Page, pdfjs } from 'react-pdf';

pdfjs.GlobalWorkerOptions.workerSrc = `//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/pdf.js/${pdfjs.version}/pdf.worker.js`;

interface IProps {
  file: string;
  width: number;
  onLoadSuccess: (pdf: any) => void;
}
export class AutoWidthPdf extends React.Component<IProps> {
  render = () => (
    <Document
      file={this.props.file}
      onLoadSuccess={(_: any) => this.props.onLoadSuccess(_)}
      >
      <Page
        pageNumber={1}
        width={this.props.width}
        />
    </Document>
  );
}

Update 1: Cancel throttleable function (still no luck)

const DEFAULT_WIDTH = 140;

class Book extends React.Component {
  setDivSizeThrottleable: ((() => void) & Cancelable) | undefined;
  pdfWrapper: HTMLDivElement | null = null;
  state = {
    hidden: true,
    pdfWidth: DEFAULT_WIDTH,
  };

  componentDidMount = () => {
    this.setDivSizeThrottleable = throttle(
      () => {
        this.setState({
          pdfWidth: this.pdfWrapper!.getBoundingClientRect().width - 5,
        });
      },
      500,
    );

    this.setDivSizeThrottleable();
    window.addEventListener("resize", this.setDivSizeThrottleable);
  };

  componentWillUnmount = () => {
    window.removeEventListener("resize", this.setDivSizeThrottleable!);
    this.setDivSizeThrottleable!.cancel();
    this.setDivSizeThrottleable = undefined;
  };

  render = () => (
    <div className="Book">
      { this.state.hidden && <div className="Book__LoadNotification centered">Book is being loaded...</div> }

      <div className={this.getPdfContentContainerClassName()}>
        <BookCommandPanel
          BookTextPath={BookTextPath}
          />

        <div className="Book__PdfContent" ref={ref => this.pdfWrapper = ref}>
          <AutoWidthPdf
            file={BookTextPath}
            width={this.state.pdfWidth}
            onLoadSuccess={(_: any) => this.onDocumentComplete()}
            />
        </div>

        <BookCommandPanel
          BookTextPath={BookTextPath}
          />
      </div>
    </div>
  );

  getPdfContentContainerClassName = () => this.state.hidden ? 'hidden' : '';

  onDocumentComplete = () => {
    try {
      this.setState({ hidden: false });
      this.setDivSizeThrottleable!();
    } catch (caughtError) {
      console.warn({ caughtError });
    }
  };
}

export default Book;
6
  • 1
    Does the problem persist if you comment out the add & remove listeners?
    – ic3b3rg
    Dec 27, 2018 at 19:20
  • 1
    @ic3b3rg the problem disappears if there's no event listening code Dec 27, 2018 at 20:26
  • 1
    ok, did you try the suggestion to do this.setDivSizeThrottleable.cancel() instead of the this.isComponentMounted guard?
    – ic3b3rg
    Dec 27, 2018 at 20:30
  • 2
    @ic3b3rg Still the same run-time warning. Dec 27, 2018 at 23:38
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of React - setState() on unmounted component Aug 27, 2019 at 19:23

27 Answers 27

439

Here is a React Hooks specific solution for

Error

Warning: Can't perform a React state update on an unmounted component.

Solution

You can declare let isMounted = true inside useEffect, which will be changed in the cleanup callback, as soon as the component is unmounted. Before state updates, you now check this variable conditionally:

useEffect(() => {
  let isMounted = true;               // note mutable flag
  someAsyncOperation().then(data => {
    if (isMounted) setState(data);    // add conditional check
  })
  return () => { isMounted = false }; // cleanup toggles value, if unmounted
}, []);                               // adjust dependencies to your needs

const Parent = () => {
  const [mounted, setMounted] = useState(true);
  return (
    <div>
      Parent:
      <button onClick={() => setMounted(!mounted)}>
        {mounted ? "Unmount" : "Mount"} Child
      </button>
      {mounted && <Child />}
      <p>
        Unmount Child, while it is still loading. It won't set state later on,
        so no error is triggered.
      </p>
    </div>
  );
};

const Child = () => {
  const [state, setState] = useState("loading (4 sec)...");
  useEffect(() => {
    let isMounted = true;
    fetchData();
    return () => {
      isMounted = false;
    };

    // simulate some Web API fetching
    function fetchData() {
      setTimeout(() => {
        // drop "if (isMounted)" to trigger error again 
        // (take IDE, doesn't work with stack snippet)
        if (isMounted) setState("data fetched")
        else console.log("aborted setState on unmounted component")
      }, 4000);
    }
  }, []);

  return <div>Child: {state}</div>;
};

ReactDOM.render(<Parent />, document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.13.0/umd/react.production.min.js" integrity="sha256-32Gmw5rBDXyMjg/73FgpukoTZdMrxuYW7tj8adbN8z4=" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.13.0/umd/react-dom.production.min.js" integrity="sha256-bjQ42ac3EN0GqK40pC9gGi/YixvKyZ24qMP/9HiGW7w=" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<div id="root"></div>
<script>var { useReducer, useEffect, useState, useRef } = React</script>

Extension: Custom useAsync Hook

We can encapsulate all the boilerplate into a custom Hook, that automatically aborts async functions in case the component unmounts or dependency values have changed before:

function useAsync(asyncFn, onSuccess) {
  useEffect(() => {
    let isActive = true;
    asyncFn().then(data => {
      if (isActive) onSuccess(data);
    });
    return () => { isActive = false };
  }, [asyncFn, onSuccess]);
}

// custom Hook for automatic abortion on unmount or dependency change
// You might add onFailure for promise errors as well.
function useAsync(asyncFn, onSuccess) {
  useEffect(() => {
    let isActive = true;
    asyncFn().then(data => {
      if (isActive) onSuccess(data)
      else console.log("aborted setState on unmounted component")
    });
    return () => {
      isActive = false;
    };
  }, [asyncFn, onSuccess]);
}

const Child = () => {
  const [state, setState] = useState("loading (4 sec)...");
  useAsync(simulateFetchData, setState);
  return <div>Child: {state}</div>;
};

const Parent = () => {
  const [mounted, setMounted] = useState(true);
  return (
    <div>
      Parent:
      <button onClick={() => setMounted(!mounted)}>
        {mounted ? "Unmount" : "Mount"} Child
      </button>
      {mounted && <Child />}
      <p>
        Unmount Child, while it is still loading. It won't set state later on,
        so no error is triggered.
      </p>
    </div>
  );
};

const simulateFetchData = () => new Promise(
  resolve => setTimeout(() => resolve("data fetched"), 4000));

ReactDOM.render(<Parent />, document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.13.0/umd/react.production.min.js" integrity="sha256-32Gmw5rBDXyMjg/73FgpukoTZdMrxuYW7tj8adbN8z4=" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.13.0/umd/react-dom.production.min.js" integrity="sha256-bjQ42ac3EN0GqK40pC9gGi/YixvKyZ24qMP/9HiGW7w=" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<div id="root"></div>
<script>var { useReducer, useEffect, useState, useRef } = React</script>

More on effect cleanups: Overreacted: A Complete Guide to useEffect

20
  • 7
    We leverage the built-in effect cleanup feature here, which runs when dependencies change and in either case when the component unmounts. So this is the perfect place to toggle an isMounted flag to false, which can be accessed from the surrounding effect callback closure scope. You can think of the cleanup function as belonging to its corresponding effect.
    – ford04
    Jul 2, 2020 at 23:28
  • 1
    @VictorMolina No, that certainly would be overkill. Consider this technique for components a) using asynchronous operations like fetch in useEffect and b) that are not stable, i.e. might be unmounted before the async result returns and is ready to be set as state.
    – ford04
    Nov 4, 2020 at 6:59
  • 6
    stackoverflow.com/a/63213676 and medium.com/better-programming/… were interesting but ultimately your answer is what finally helped me get mine working. Thanks!
    – Ryan
    Jan 6, 2021 at 23:30
  • 2
    This seems like a nice solution if you've already narrowed down the cause/useEffect that is causing the problem, but one of the questions 1. asks how to figure out which component, handler, hook etc is responsible for this error. Why are there so many upvotes on a problem that doesn't make any mention of the whole problem and answer both questions? I checked and there also aren't any posts in this entire thread about any tips to go about finding the source of the error; is it impossible to figure out based on the stack trace?
    – Jonathan
    Jun 18, 2021 at 4:25
  • 3
    @Woodz yes, good hint. useCallback is the usual and recommended way in React to defer responsibility for dependencies to the client of useAsync. You might switch to mutable refs inside useAsync to store the most recent callback, so clients can directly pass their functions/callbacks without dependencies. But I would sparingly use this pattern, as probably more confusing and imperative approach.
    – ford04
    Jul 3, 2021 at 9:55
138

To remove - Can't perform a React state update on an unmounted component warning, use componentDidMount method under a condition and make false that condition on componentWillUnmount method. For example : -

class Home extends Component {
  _isMounted = false;

  constructor(props) {
    super(props);

    this.state = {
      news: [],
    };
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    this._isMounted = true;

    ajaxVar
      .get('https://domain')
      .then(result => {
        if (this._isMounted) {
          this.setState({
            news: result.data.hits,
          });
        }
      });
  }

  componentWillUnmount() {
    this._isMounted = false;
  }

  render() {
    ...
  }
}
8
  • 7
    This worked, but why should this work? What exactly causes this error? and how this fixed it :|
    – Abhinav
    Feb 22, 2020 at 19:55
  • 1
    It work fine. It stops the repetitive call of setState method because it validate _isMounted value before setState call, then at last again reset to false in componentWillUnmount(). I think, that's the way it work.
    – Abhishek
    Mar 2, 2020 at 10:51
  • 11
    for hook component use this: const isMountedComponent = useRef(true); useEffect(() => { if (isMountedComponent.current) { ... } return () => { isMountedComponent.current = false; }; });
    – x-magix
    May 22, 2020 at 13:37
  • 1
    @x-magix You don't really need a ref for this, you can just use a local variable which the return function can close on.
    – Mordechai
    Jun 15, 2020 at 21:25
  • 3
    @Abhinav My best guess why this works is that _isMounted isn't managed by React (unlike state) and is therefore not subject to React's rendering pipeline. The issue is that when a component is set to be unmounted, React dequeues any calls to setState() (which would trigger a 're-render'); therefore, the state is never updated Oct 15, 2020 at 22:35
87

If above solutions dont work, try this and it works for me:

componentWillUnmount() {
    // fix Warning: Can't perform a React state update on an unmounted component
    this.setState = (state,callback)=>{
        return;
    };
}
3
  • 2
    @BadriPaudel return null when escapse component, it will no longer hold any data in memory
    – May'Habit
    Jun 23, 2020 at 14:49
  • 2
    return what? just paste it like it is?
    – plus
    Nov 1, 2020 at 13:39
  • 4
    I don't recommend this solution, it's pretty hacky. @BadriPaudel This will replace the setState function after the componentWillUnmount with a function that does nothing. The setState function will continue to be called. Jul 12, 2021 at 13:55
48

There is a hook that's fairly common called useIsMounted that solves this problem (for functional components)...

import { useRef, useEffect } from 'react';

export function useIsMounted() {
  const isMounted = useRef(false);

  useEffect(() => {
    isMounted.current = true;
    return () => isMounted.current = false;
  }, []);

  return isMounted;
}

then in your functional component

function Book() {
  const isMounted = useIsMounted();
  ...

  useEffect(() => {
    asyncOperation().then(data => {
      if (isMounted.current) { setState(data); }
    })
  });
  ...
}
4
  • Can we use the same hook with multiple component? Aug 27, 2021 at 4:24
  • 4
    @AyushKumar: yes you can! that's the beauty of hooks! the isMounted state will be specific to each component that calls useIsMounted!
    – sfletche
    Sep 4, 2021 at 4:43
  • I guess this way of useIsMounted solving should be included in the core package.
    – dhanushkac
    Nov 2, 2021 at 20:23
  • Another question is if I have added UseIsMounted, in my useEffect hook, and I have started a listener. Will adding a return () => inside of code will cause any leak? Nov 16, 2021 at 16:45
17

Checking if a component is mounted is actually an anti pattern as per React documentation. The solution to the setState warning is rather to leverage on the use of an AbortController:

useEffect(() => {
  const abortController = new AbortController()   // creating an AbortController
  fetch(url, { signal: abortController.signal })  // passing the signal to the query
    .then(data => {
      setState(data)                              // if everything went well, set the state
    })
    .catch(error => {
      if (error.name === 'AbortError') return     // if the query has been aborted, do nothing
      throw error
    })
  
  return () => {
    abortController.abort()                       // stop the query by aborting on the AbortController on unmount
  }
}, [])

For asynchronous operations that aren't based on the Fetch API, there still should be a way to cancel these asynchronous operations, and you should rather leverage these than just checking if a component is mounted. If you are building your own API, you can implement the AbortController API in it to handle it.

For more context, the check if a component is mounted is an anti pattern as React is checking internally if the component is mounted to display that warning. Doing the same check again is just a way to hide the warning, and there are some easier ways to hide them than adding this piece of code on a big part of a codebase.

Source: https://medium.com/doctolib/react-stop-checking-if-your-component-is-mounted-3bb2568a4934

15

I had this warning possibly because of calling setState from an effect hook (This is discussed in these 3 issues linked together).

Anyway, upgrading the react version removed the warning.

0
11

React already removed this warning but here is a better solution (not just workaround)

useEffect(() => {
  const abortController = new AbortController()   // creating an AbortController
  fetch(url, { signal: abortController.signal })  // passing the signal to the query
    .then(data => {
      setState(data)                              // if everything went well, set the state
    })
    .catch(error => {
      if (error.name === 'AbortError') return     // if the query has been aborted, do nothing
      throw error
    })
  
  return () => {
    abortController.abort() 
  }
}, [])
1
  • Great solution when you fetch something! Much better to stop fetching (saves data for user + server resources) Mar 9 at 10:30
8

The solution from @ford04 didn't worked to me and specially if you need to use the isMounted in multiple places (multiple useEffect for instance), it's recommended to useRef, as bellow:

  1. Essential packages
"dependencies": 
{
  "react": "17.0.1",
}
"devDependencies": { 
  "typescript": "4.1.5",
}

  1. My Hook Component
export const SubscriptionsView: React.FC = () => {
  const [data, setData] = useState<Subscription[]>();
  const isMounted = React.useRef(true);

  React.useEffect(() => {
    if (isMounted.current) {
      // fetch data
      // setData (fetch result)

      return () => {
        isMounted.current = false;
      };
    }
  }
});
1
  • 1
    Agree on the point and it is more convenient to go with this solution and it ensures single source of truth.
    – dhanushkac
    Nov 2, 2021 at 20:20
5

try changing setDivSizeThrottleable to

this.setDivSizeThrottleable = throttle(
  () => {
    if (this.isComponentMounted) {
      this.setState({
        pdfWidth: this.pdfWrapper!.getBoundingClientRect().width - 5,
      });
    }
  },
  500,
  { leading: false, trailing: true }
);
1
  • I did try it. Now I am consistently seeing the warning which I was only observing time to time on resizing the window before making this change. ¯_(ツ)_/¯ Thanks for trying this though. Dec 28, 2018 at 1:09
5

I know that you're not using history, but in my case I was using the useHistory hook from React Router DOM, which unmounts the component before the state is persisted in my React Context Provider.

To fix this problem I have used the hook withRouter nesting the component, in my case export default withRouter(Login), and inside the component const Login = props => { ...; props.history.push("/dashboard"); .... I have also removed the other props.history.push from the component, e.g, if(authorization.token) return props.history.push('/dashboard') because this causes a loop, because the authorization state.

An alternative to push a new item to history.

5

Add a ref to a jsx component and then check it exist

function Book() {
  const ref = useRef();

  useEffect(() => {
    asyncOperation().then(data => {
      if (ref.current) setState(data);
    })
  });

  return <div ref={ref}>content</div>
}
1
  • 1
    This works for me, Nextjs app Sep 18, 2021 at 22:08
4

I had a similar issue thanks @ford04 helped me out.

However, another error occurred.

NB. I am using ReactJS hooks

ndex.js:1 Warning: Cannot update during an existing state transition (such as within `render`). Render methods should be a pure function of props and state.

What causes the error?

import {useHistory} from 'react-router-dom'

const History = useHistory()
if (true) {
  history.push('/new-route');
}
return (
  <>
    <render component />
  </>
)

This could not work because despite you are redirecting to new page all state and props are being manipulated on the dom or simply rendering to the previous page did not stop.

What solution I found

import {Redirect} from 'react-router-dom'

if (true) {
  return <redirect to="/new-route" />
}
return (
  <>
    <render component />
  </>
)
2
  • Nice solution but it should be return <Redirect to="/new-route" />
    – mkane
    Jun 22, 2021 at 15:09
  • code inside 'if(true)' is always executed, are you sure this solved your issue? If so you can simply put the 'return <redirect to="/new-route" />` Aug 21 at 5:11
4

If you are fetching data from axios and the error still occurs, just wrap the setter inside the condition

let isRendered = useRef(false);
useEffect(() => {
    isRendered = true;
    axios
        .get("/sample/api")
        .then(res => {
            if (isRendered) {
                setState(res.data);
            }
            return null;
        })
        .catch(err => console.log(err));
    return () => {
        isRendered = false;
    };
}, []);
2
  • 1
    why you're not using isRendered without .current ? is that a feature?
    – usertest
    Mar 11, 2021 at 14:22
  • @usertest I just implemented this solution but had to use .current.
    – Mideus
    Apr 16, 2021 at 15:22
4

I have 2 solutions for this error:

  1. return:

If you are used hook and useEffect, So put a return end of useEffect.

useEffect(() => {
    window.addEventListener('mousemove', logMouseMove)
    return () => {
        window.removeEventListener('mousemove', logMouseMove)
    }
}, [])
  1. componentWillUnmount:

If you are used componentDidMount, So put componentWillUnmount next to it.

componentDidMount() { 
    window.addEventListener('mousemove', this.logMouseMove)
}

componentWillUnmount() {
    window.removeEventListener('mousemove', this.logMouseMove)
}
3

The isMounted approach is an anti-pattern in most cases because it doesn't actually clean up/cancel anything, it just avoids changing state on unmounted components, but does nothing with pending asynchronous tasks. The React team recently removed the leak warning because users keep creating a lot of anti-patterns to hide the warning rather than fix its cause.

But writing cancellable code in plain JS can be really tricky. To fix this I made my own lib useAsyncEffect2 with custom hooks, built on top of a cancellable promise (c-promise2) for executing cancellable async code to reach its graceful cancellation. All async stages (promises), including deep ones, are cancellable. This means that the request here will be automatically aborted if its parent context is canceled. Of course, any other asynchronous operation can be used instead of a request.

  • useAsyncEffect Demo with plain useState usage (Live Demo):
    import React, { useState } from "react";
    import { useAsyncEffect } from "use-async-effect2";
    import cpAxios from "cp-axios";
    
    function TestComponent({url}) {
      const [text, setText] = useState("");
    
      const cancel = useAsyncEffect(
        function* () {
          setText("fetching...");
          const json = (yield cpAxios(url)).data;
          setText(`Success: ${JSON.stringify(json)}`);
        },
        [url]
      );
    
      return (
        <div>
          <div>{text}</div>
          <button onClick={cancel}>
            Cancel request
          </button>
        </div>
      );
    }
  • useAsyncEffect Demo with internal states usage (Live Demo):
    import React from "react";
    import { useAsyncEffect } from "use-async-effect2";
    import cpAxios from "cp-axios";
    
    function TestComponent({ url, timeout }) {
      const [cancel, done, result, err] = useAsyncEffect(
        function* () {
          return (yield cpAxios(url).timeout(timeout)).data;
        },
        { states: true, deps: [url] }
      );
    
      return (
        <div>
          {done ? (err ? err.toString() : JSON.stringify(result)) : "loading..."}
          <button onClick={cancel} disabled={done}>
            Cancel async effect (abort request)
          </button>
        </div>
      );
    }
  • Class component using decorators (Live demo)
import React, { Component } from "react";
import { ReactComponent } from "c-promise2";
import cpAxios from "cp-axios";

@ReactComponent
class TestComponent extends Component {
  state = {
    text: ""
  };

  *componentDidMount(scope) {
    const { url, timeout } = this.props;
    const response = yield cpAxios(url).timeout(timeout);
    this.setState({ text: JSON.stringify(response.data, null, 2) });
  }

  render() {
    return (<div>{this.state.text}</div>);
  }
}

export default TestComponent;

More other examples:

2

Edit: I just realized the warning is referencing a component called TextLayerInternal. That's likely where your bug is. The rest of this is still relevant, but it might not fix your problem.

1) Getting the instance of a component for this warning is tough. It looks like there is some discussion to improve this in React but there currently is no easy way to do it. The reason it hasn't been built yet, I suspect, is likely because components are expected to be written in such a way that setState after unmount isn't possible no matter what the state of the component is. The problem, as far as the React team is concerned, is always in the Component code and not the Component instance, which is why you get the Component Type name.

That answer might be unsatisfactory, but I think I can fix your problem.

2) Lodashes throttled function has a cancel method. Call cancel in componentWillUnmount and ditch the isComponentMounted. Canceling is more "idiomatically" React than introducing a new property.

2
  • Issue is, I don't directly control TextLayerInternal. Thus, I don't know "who's fault is the setState() call". I'll try the cancel as per your advice and see how it goes, Dec 27, 2018 at 20:29
  • Unfortunately, I still see the warning. Please check the code in Update 1 section to verify I'm doing things the right way. Dec 27, 2018 at 23:37
2

UPDATE DO NOT USE MY ORIGINAL ANSWER AS IT DOES NOT WORK

This answer was based on the use of cancelable promises and a note in makecancelable which I migrated to use hooks. However, it appears it does not cancel a chain of async/await and even cancelable-promise does not support canceling of a chain of awaits

Doing a bit more research on this, it appears that some internal Google reasons prevented cancelable promises from coming into the standard.

Further more, there was some promise with Bluebird which introduces cancelable promises, but it does not work in Expo or at least I haven't seen an example of it working in Expo.

The accepted answer is the best. Since I use TypeScript I had adapted the code with a few modifications (I explicitly set the dependencies since the accepted answer's implicit dependencies appear to give a re-render loop on my app, added and use async/await rather than promise chain, pass a ref to the mounted object so that an async/await chain can be canceled earlier if needed)

/**
 * This starts an async function and executes another function that performs
 * React state changes if the component is still mounted after the async
 * operation completes
 * @template T
 * @param {(mountedRef: React.MutableRefObject<boolean>) => Promise<T>} asyncFunction async function,
 *   it has a copy of the mounted ref so an await chain can be canceled earlier.
 * @param {(asyncResult: T) => void} onSuccess this gets executed after async
 *   function is resolved and the component is still mounted
 * @param {import("react").DependencyList} deps
 */
export function useAsyncSetEffect(asyncFunction, onSuccess, deps) {
  const mountedRef = useRef(false);
  useEffect(() => {
    mountedRef.current = true;
    (async () => {
      const x = await asyncFunction(mountedRef);
      if (mountedRef.current) {
        onSuccess(x);
      }
    })();
    return () => {
      mountedRef.current = false;
    };
  }, deps);
}

Original answer

Since I have many different operations that are async, I use the cancelable-promise package to resolve this issue with minimal code changes.

Previous code:

useEffect(() => 
  (async () => {
    const bar = await fooAsync();
    setSomeState(bar);
  })(),
  []
);

New code:

import { cancelable } from "cancelable-promise";

...

useEffect(
  () => {
    const cancelablePromise = cancelable(async () => {
      const bar = await fooAsync();
      setSomeState(bar);
    })
    return () => cancelablePromise.cancel();
  },
  []
);

You can alsowrpte it in a custom utility function like this

/**
 * This wraps an async function in a cancelable promise
 * @param {() => PromiseLike<void>} asyncFunction
 * @param {React.DependencyList} deps
 */
export function useCancelableEffect(asyncFunction, deps) {
  useEffect(() => {
    const cancelablePromise = cancelable(asyncFunction());
    return () => cancelablePromise.cancel();
  }, deps);
}
1

Based on @ford04 answer, here is the same encapsulated in a method :

import React, { FC, useState, useEffect, DependencyList } from 'react';

export function useEffectAsync( effectAsyncFun : ( isMounted: () => boolean ) => unknown, deps?: DependencyList ) {
    useEffect( () => {
        let isMounted = true;
        const _unused = effectAsyncFun( () => isMounted );
        return () => { isMounted = false; };
    }, deps );
} 

Usage:

const MyComponent : FC<{}> = (props) => {
    const [ asyncProp , setAsyncProp ] = useState( '' ) ;
    useEffectAsync( async ( isMounted ) =>
    {
        const someAsyncProp = await ... ;
        if ( isMounted() )
             setAsyncProp( someAsyncProp ) ;
    });
    return <div> ... ;
} ;
1

Depending on how you open your webpage, you may not be causing a mounting. Such as using a <Link/> back to a page that was already mounted in the virtual DOM, so requiring data from a componentDidMount lifecycle is caught.

2
  • Are you saying that componentDidMount() could be called twice without an intermediate componentWillUnmount() call in between? I don't think that's possible. Dec 24, 2020 at 18:35
  • 1
    No, I'm saying that it is not called twice which is why the page doesn't process the code inside componentDidMount() when using the <Link/>. I use Redux for these problems and keep the webpage's data in the Reducer store so that I don't need to reload the page anyways. Jan 4, 2021 at 10:13
1

Here is a simple solution for this. This warning is due to when we do some fetch request while that request is in the background (because some requests take some time.)and we navigate back from that screen then they react cannot update the state. here is the example code for this. write this line before every state Update.

if(!isScreenMounted.current) return;

Here is the Complete Code

import React , {useRef} from 'react'
import { Text,StatusBar,SafeAreaView,ScrollView, StyleSheet } from 'react-native'
import BASEURL from '../constants/BaseURL';
const SearchScreen = () => {
    const isScreenMounted = useRef(true)
    useEffect(() => {
        return () =>  isScreenMounted.current = false
    },[])

    const ConvertFileSubmit = () => {
        if(!isScreenMounted.current) return;
         setUpLoading(true)
 
         var formdata = new FormData();
         var file = {
             uri: `file://${route.params.selectedfiles[0].uri}`,
             type:`${route.params.selectedfiles[0].minetype}`,
             name:`${route.params.selectedfiles[0].displayname}`,
         };
         
         formdata.append("file",file);
         
         fetch(`${BASEURL}/UploadFile`, {
             method: 'POST',
             body: formdata,
             redirect: 'manual'
         }).then(response => response.json())
         .then(result => {
             if(!isScreenMounted.current) return;
             setUpLoading(false)    
         }).catch(error => {
             console.log('error', error)
         });
     }

    return(
    <>
        <StatusBar barStyle="dark-content" />
        <SafeAreaView>
            <ScrollView
            contentInsetAdjustmentBehavior="automatic"
            style={styles.scrollView}>
               <Text>Search Screen</Text>
            </ScrollView>
        </SafeAreaView>
    </>
    )
}

export default SearchScreen;


const styles = StyleSheet.create({
    scrollView: {
        backgroundColor:"red",
    },
    container:{
        flex:1,
        justifyContent:"center",
        alignItems:"center"
    }
})
1

I solved this problem by providing all the params that are used in the useEffect hook

The code reported the bug:

useEffect(() => {
    getDistrict({
      geonameid: countryId,
      subdistrict: level,
    }).then((res) => {
      ......
    });
  }, [countryId]);

The code after fix:

useEffect(() => {
    getDistrict({
      geonameid: countryId,
      subdistrict: level,
    }).then((res) => {
      ......
    });
  }, [countryId,level]);

Can see that , problems solved after I provided all the params(including the level param) that supposed to pass through.

0

I had a similar problem and solved it :

I was automatically making the user logged-in by dispatching an action on redux ( placing authentication token on redux state )

and then I was trying to show a message with this.setState({succ_message: "...") in my component.

Component was looking empty with the same error on console : "unmounted component".."memory leak" etc.

After I read Walter's answer up in this thread

I've noticed that in the Routing table of my application , my component's route wasn't valid if user is logged-in :

{!this.props.user.token &&
        <div>
            <Route path="/register/:type" exact component={MyComp} />                                             
        </div>
}

I made the Route visible whether the token exists or not.

0

OK with :

  componentWillUnmount() {
    this._isMounted = false;
  }
1
  • 1
    Please don't post code-only answers but add a little textual explanation about how and why your approach works and what makes it different from the other answers given. You may also have a look at our "How to write a good answer" entry.
    – ahuemmer
    Jul 27 at 9:18
-1

Inspired by the accepted answer by @ford04 I had even better approach dealing with it, instead of using useEffect inside useAsync create a new function that returns a callback for componentWillUnmount :

function asyncRequest(asyncRequest, onSuccess, onError, onComplete) {
  let isMounted=true
  asyncRequest().then((data => isMounted ? onSuccess(data):null)).catch(onError).finally(onComplete)
  return () => {isMounted=false}
}

...

useEffect(()=>{
        return asyncRequest(()=>someAsyncTask(arg), response=> {
            setSomeState(response)
        },onError, onComplete)
    },[])

2
  • I'd wouldn't recommend relying on a local isMounted variable, but make it a state instead (via useState hook). Jan 11, 2021 at 18:33
  • 2
    How does it matter? Atleast I can't think of any different behaviour. Jan 11, 2021 at 20:46
-1
const handleClick = async (item: NavheadersType, index: number) => {
    const newNavHeaders = [...navheaders];
    if (item.url) {
      await router.push(item.url);   =>>>> line causing error (causing route to happen)
      // router.push(item.url);  =>>> coreect line
      newNavHeaders.forEach((item) => (item.active = false));
      newNavHeaders[index].active = true;
      setnavheaders([...newNavHeaders]);
    }
  };
1
  • Can you please add some definition?
    – Akif
    Feb 10, 2021 at 15:22
-1

The simplest and most compact solution (with an explanation) is seen below as a one-liner solution.

useEffect(() => { return () => {}; }, []);

The useEffect() example above returns a callback function triggers React to finish its unmount portion of its life-cycle prior to updating state.

That very simplistic solution is all that is needed. In addition, it also works unlike the fictional syntax provided by @ford04 and @sfletche . By the way, the below code snippet from @ford04 is purely imaginary syntax (@sfletche , @vinod , @guneetgstar , and @Drew Cordano used the very same imaginary syntax).

data => {       <--- Fictional/Imaginary Syntax

someAsyncOperation().then(data => {
    if (isMounted) setState(data);    // add conditional check
  })

All of my linters and all the linters of my entire team will not accept it and they report Uncaught SyntaxError: unexpected token: '=>'. I am surprised that no one caught the imaginary syntax. Would anyone who has participated in this question-thread, particularly among the up-voters, explain to me how they got the solutions to work for them?

3
  • Your claim about "imaginary syntax" is a mistake. It works for many other folks! If your someAsynchronousOperation() return value type is Promise<void> then sure data will cause a TypeScript compilation error. However, if it's Promise<X> where X is not undefined/void/never, you'd definitely be able to use .then(data => {...})! You're have not provided a complete minimal example to reason about it. If you want your specific code issue resolved, open a separate question on StackOverflow. You don't want to get downvotes or have the answer flagged. May 27, 2021 at 7:38
  • 1
    Are you talking about the arrow function? This was introduced in ES6. I don't know how you've configured your linter but this is very common syntax. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Jun 19, 2021 at 11:37
  • Well I didn't down vote you... Without knowing anything about your linter settings, or anything about your tech stack I can't say for sure why that appears as a syntax error for you, but perhaps it's because your linter is using settings for older versions of Javascript that don't support this, but that's just a guess. Nov 29, 2021 at 21:43
-2

Inspired by @ford04 answer I use this hook, which also takes callbacks for success, errors, finally and an abortFn:

export const useAsync = (
        asyncFn, 
        onSuccess = false, 
        onError = false, 
        onFinally = false, 
        abortFn = false
    ) => {

    useEffect(() => {
        let isMounted = true;
        const run = async () => {
            try{
                let data = await asyncFn()
                if (isMounted && onSuccess) onSuccess(data)
            } catch(error) {
                if (isMounted && onError) onSuccess(error)
            } finally {
                if (isMounted && onFinally) onFinally()
            }
        }
        run()
        return () => {
            if(abortFn) abortFn()
            isMounted = false
        };
    }, [asyncFn, onSuccess])
}

If the asyncFn is doing some kind of fetch from back-end it often makes sense to abort it when the component is unmounted (not always though, sometimes if ie. you're loading some data into a store you might as well just want to finish it even if component is unmounted)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.